Brussels DL — American Records For Winger & Fisher

Kara Winger’s AR 223-5 claimed the yearly world lead in the javelin. (JIRO MOCHIZUKI)

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM, September 01-02—The 46th edition of the Van Damme Memorial had a lot going on — a lot. Where does one even start? For U.S. fans, two American Records certainly jump to the front of the queue, with Kara Winger and Grant Fisher both knocking down U.S. standards.

For the 36-year-old Winger, the big throw came in what was scheduled to be one of the final meets of her illustrious career. In a javelins to tennis balls comparison, she in a sense outdid grande dame of the court Serena Williams who exited the stage at the U.S. Open on the same day.

In a competition that featured all of the Eugene medalists, Winger led from round 1, her 204-11 (62.47) the best throw of the first three stanzas. Teenager Adriana Vilagos of Serbia, the World Junior (U20) champion, jumped ahead briefly with her round 4 toss of 206-8 (63.00), but Winger — yes, nearly twice her age — put the youngster in her place with a 209-4 (63.82). That would have sufficed for the win, as Eugene bronze medalist Haruka Kitaguchi of Japan hit 208-2 (63.45) on her final throw for 2nd, but Winger wasn’t quite done.

With the wind at her back, she licked her fingertips, grasped her spear, and trotted down the runway, completely focused and relaxed. Her face told the story: she knew it was big as soon as she released it, and she watched it soar with a growing sense of wonder. When it landed, she heard the crowd’s roar, but had to wait to be sure. When 68.11 popped up on the board, her emotions exploded. That’s 223-5, a new American Record, adding more than 2ft to the 221-1 (67.40) set by Maggie Malone last summer. She immediately ran to hug husband/coach, Russ Winger.

“I feel so incredible!,” she said. “My last personal best was 12 years ago in 2010 and I’ve had two surgeries since then. I felt really amazing this year.”

Fisher’s new standard came in the 5000. He made no secret of his intentions, telling T&FN two days before, “The American Record is my goal. A lot of things have to go right, but that’s the target. Fingers crossed that I have enough energy in the legs still, but I’ve been feeling good in training and I’m in the best shape of my life this whole year. Might as well strike while the iron’s hot and get after it.”

That he did. While rabbits took the field through the first 2 kilos in 2:33.68 and 2:33.47 (5:07.15), Fisher hung close and laser-focused on staying with the planned 12:50 pace. At 3K, Yomif Kejelcha led in 7:41.74, with Fisher 5th in 7:42.5. After 3200 (8:12.9), Jacob Krop, the Eugene silver medalist, took over.

The lead pack got smaller and smaller, and every time someone wavered, Fisher quickly moved past. With 800 to go, it was Krop, Daniel Ebenyo and Fisher. The American moved into 2nd before the bell and stayed nicely behind the Kenyan until the final 200, when Krop began to pull away.

The Kenyan scored a world-leading 12:45.71, moving to No. 6 in world history. Fisher lost ground despite finishing with a 58.9, maintaining form to cross in 12:46.96, slashing more than 6 seconds off Bernard Lagat’s AR of 12:53.60 set 11 years ago in Monaco. Within minutes Lagat tweeted, “That was BALLs… man… I need a drink.”

Said Fisher, “Everyone was pushing hard. I had the legs today, which is a good feeling. I didn’t have the legs towards the end, so I couldn’t keep up. It’s very tough to find another gear when you’re going that fast.”

The penultimate meet on the Diamond League circuit wasn’t all about Americans. In fact, Americans only won two other events. The lone battle the night before saw Joe Kovacs dominate the shot in the city center, destroying the meet record with his 74-2¼ (22.61) as Tom Walsh took 2nd at 70-10½ (21.60).

In the 200, Erriyon Knighton used a late drive to run 20.07 (into a 2.9 wind no less), beating Alexander Ogando of the Dominican Republic (20.18).

World Records fell, though they didn’t make many headlines, let alone the broadcast. In the pre-prime time window, Kenyans Sabastian Sawe and Kibiwott Kandie went after the rarely-contested hour-run mark, along with the assorted split records that generally come along the way.

At 15K, Sawe split 41:51.64 to break Haile Gebrselassie’s ’07 mark of 42:18.70. At 10M, he broke another Geb record with his 44:57.65 (old best 45:23.80). The pace started to slip, and Sawe missed the 20K WR by 0.53 with his 56:20.55. When he got to the end of the hour, he was at 21,250m, the No. 4 performance ever, just 80m shy of Mo Farah’s record, set in this meet two years ago. Kandie finished 2nd at 20,940m, No. 8 all-time.

The crowd got loud for the middle distances. The women’s 1500 went out at an ambitious 60.68/2:05.00 clip, a tempo planned to give Laura Muir a shot at the World Record. But the Scot, on a tear with a world bronze and Commonwealth and Euro golds, didn’t quite have that kind of steam on the last lap.

A 12:46.96 for Grant Fisher saw him replace Bernard Lagat as the fastest American ever. (JIRO MOCHIZUKI)

Instead, it was unheralded Ciara Mageean of Ireland who reeled in fading Diribe Welteji and sprinted to victory on the final straight. Her Irish Record 3:56.63 cut 3.52 off her best, the 4:00.15 she ran in placing 10th in the ’19 Worlds.

“This blows my mind,” said Mageean, who had missed her nationals and a chance at Eugene with a case of COVID. “People say that in athletics and in life every so often you have a day where you are completely in the zone. It doesn´t happen when you want to and you never know when it will happen. I can only say that this is how I felt today: I was in the zone and it felt like I was running on clouds.”

Muir closed well to take 2nd (3:56.86) ahead of Ethiopians Freweyni Hailu (3:56.94) and Welteji (3:57.82). In 5th, Heather MacLean scored a PR 3:58.76 to become the No. 7 American ever, with Elise Cranny right behind at 3:59.61.

A thrilling men’s 800 saw the rabbit take the field out in a swift 49.66. Then world 1500 champ Jake Wightman made his bid, leading through 600 in 1:16.8 and holding off the world 800 champ, Emmanuel Korir, on the final turn. He won in a PR 1:43.85, as Algerian Djamel Sedjati caught Korir on the line, both clocking 1:44.12.

In the women’s 100, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce got out best and held the lead for 98% of the race, but in the final two strides Shericka Jackson edged barely ahead, 10.73–10.74. Marie-Josée Ta Lou ran 3rd (10.78) ahead of Americans Aleia Hobbs (10.91) and Sha’Carri Richardson (10.93).

After crossing, Jackson took a while to agree that she had won, even refusing to take the flowers at first, with a priceless expression of disbelief. Said Jackson of her first-ever head-to-head victory over SAFP in 9 tries, “She’s a tough cookie to beat.”

Jasmine Camacho-Quinn won her sixth DL hurdles of the season, leading all the way to a 12.27 — the second-fastest legal clocking of her career — with a negligible 0.1 breeze. “I actually ran the race that I wanted,” she said. Behind her, Keni Harrison chased best for 10 hurdles but Tia Jones passed her for 2nd on the run-in, clocking a 12.38 PR to Harrison’s 12.40.

Much was made of a WR attempt in the women’s steeple, but the pace never came close. Jackline Chepkoech, who failed to make the Eugene final, sported a lead at 2K and with 600 to go still was 2.5 seconds ahead. However, a late charge on the final lap from Ethiopian Werkuha Getachew made the final go-round suspenseful, but the Kenyan teenager held on to score a 9:02.43 PR victory.

In the women’s 400, Firodaliza Cofil of the Dominican Republic made her first open trip under 50 with her 49.80 win. Cofil, who anchored the gold medal mixed relay in Eugene, powered ahead of Sada Williams (50.15) in the final 50.

On the field, the men’s vault produced a result as stunning to Mondo Duplantis as it was to the world, the World Record holder getting beaten by EJ Obiena of the Philippines. Obiena, behind when the bar went to 19-4¾ (5.91), cleared that height on his third attempt. Duplantis struggled, and on his third he had a typically massive height, but atypically knocked the bar off with his arm on the way down. It was his first defeat since an off-performance in Lausanne a year ago.

“It took a lot of luck, a good day and some excellent calls to beat Mondo today,” said Obiena.

Said Mondo, “I’m human and I make mistakes and I definitely did some today. I didn´t find the good rhythm on the runway today. I was just thinking about the wrong things. It happens sometimes.”

In a stirring high jump performance, Ukraine’s Yaroslava Mahuchikh easily cleared the highest outdoor bar of her life, 6-8¾ (2.05), to leave world champion Eleanor Patterson (6-4¼/1.94) far behind in the runner-up position. She had three decent shots at a WR 6-10¾ (2.10).

“I’m so joyful that I jumped my personal best, because my previous record was from 2019 and that is a long time,” said Mahuchikh, who added, “Today I jumped for all the Ukrainian people.”


BRUSSELS MEN’S RESULTS

200(-2.9): 1. Erriyon Knighton (US) 20.07; 2. Alexander Ogando (DR) 20.18; 3. Aaron Brown (Can) 20.22; 4. Jereem Richards (Tri) 20.27; 5. Reynier Mena (Cub) 20.38; 6. Joe Fahnbulleh (Lbr) 20.60; 7. Robin Vanderbemden (Bel) 21.02; 8. Eseosa Desalu (Ita) 21.09.

Non-DL 400: 1. Kevin Borlée (Bel) 45.72; 2. Christopher O’Donnell (Ire) 45.78; 3. Alexander Doom (Bel) 45.82; 4. Jonathan Borlée (Bel) 45.90; 5. Dylan Borlée (Bel) 46.07; 6. Jochem Dobber (Neth) 46.46; 7. Jonathan Sacoor (Bel) 46.60; 8. Thomas Jordier (Fra) 47.55.

800: 1. Jake Wightman (GB) 1:43.65 PR; 2. Djamel Sedjati (Alg) 1:44.12; 3. Emmanuel Korir (Ken) 1:44.12; 4. Eliott Crestan (Bel) 1:44.24 PR; 5. Marco Arop (Can) 1:44.48; 6. Wycliffe Kinyamal (Ken) 1:44.49; 7. Mariano Garcia (Spa) 1:44.86; 8. Ferguson Rotich (Ken) 1:45.16; 9. Collins Kipruto (Ken) 1:45.61; 10. Gabriel Tual (Fra) 1:45.64; 11. Benjamin Robert (Fra) 1:47.94;… rabbit—Khaled Benmahdi (Alg) (49.66).

5000: 1. Jacob Krop (Ken) 12:45.71 PR (WL) (6, 11 W) (10:15.42);

2. Grant Fisher (US) 12:46.96 AR (old AR 12:53.60 Bernard Lagat [Nik] ’11) (12, 17 W);

3. Nicholas Kipkorir (Ken) 12:50.97; 4. Dominic Lokinyomo Lobalu (SSD) 12:52.15 NR; 5. Daniel Simiyu (Ken) 12:54.90 PR; 6. Stewart McSweyn (Aus) 12:56.50 PR; 7. Oscar Chelimo (Uga) 13:00.42 PR; 8. Andreas Almgren (Swe) 13:01.70 NR; 9. Luis Grijalva (Gua) 13:02.94 NR; 10. Cornelius Kemboi (Ken) 13:03.49 PR; 11. Thierry Ndikumwenayo (Bur) 13:10.71; 12. Woody Kincaid (US) 13:13.90; 13. Joe Klecker (US) 13:15.17; 14. Stanley Waithaka (Ken) 13:24.43;… dnf—Yomif Kejelcha (Eth) (7:41.74);… rabbits—Mounir Akbache (Fra) (2:33.68), Wilberforce Kones (Ken) (5:07.15).

Non-DL Hour: 1. Sabastian Sawe (Ken) 21,250m (13.20M) (WL) (4, 4 W) (15K—41:51.64 WR [old WR 42:18.70 Haile Gebrselassie {Eth} ’07]; 10M—44:57.65 WR [old WR 45:23.80 Gebrselassie ’07]; 20K—56:20.55 [2, 2 W]);

2. Kibiwott Kandie (Ken) 20,940m (8, 8 W);

3. Albert Tonui (Ken) 20,171m; 4. Emmanuel Kipchumba (Ken) 19,996m; 5. Andreas Vojta (Aut) 19,635m; 6. Michael Kamau (Ken) 19,316m.

400H: 1. Alison dos Santos (Bra) 47.54; 2. Khallifah Rosser (US) 47.88; 3. Wilfried Happio (Fra) 48.61; 4. Julien Watrin (Bel) 48.66 NR; 5. Constantin Preis (Ger) 48.83; 6. Yasmani Copello (Tur) 48.83; 7. Ismail Nezir (Tur) 49.92;… dq—CJ Allen (US).

Field Events

PV: 1. EJ Obiena (Phi) 19-4¾ (5.91) (18-4¾, 19-¾ [2], 19-4¾ [3]) (5.61, 5.81 [2], 5.91 [3]); 2. Mondo Duplantis (Swe) 19-¾ (5.81) (18-4¾ [2], 19-¾, 19-4¾ [xxx]) (5.61 [2], 5.81, 5.91 [xxx]); 3. Chris Nilsen (US) 18-8¾ (5.71); 4. Rutger Koppelaar (Neth) 18-8¾; 5. Thiago Braz (Bra) 18-8¾; 6. Renaud Lavillenie (Fra) 18-4¾ (5.61); 7. Oleg Zernikel (Ger) 18-4¾; 8. Sondre Guttormsen (Nor) 17-9 (5.41);… nh—Pål Haugen Lillefosse (Nor), Ben Broeders (Bel).

TJ: 1. Lázaro Martínez (Cub) 57-4¾ (17.49) (f, 57-4¾, p, p, p, p) (f, 17.49, p, p, p, p); 2. Hugues Fabrice Zango (Bur) 57-1 (17.40) (55-3, f, 55-5¾, 56-3¾, 56-6, 57-1) (16.84, f, 16.91, 17.16, 17.22, 17.40); 3. Almir dos Santos (Bra) 55-2 (16.81); 4. Christian Taylor (US) 54-10¼ (16.72); 5. Donald Scott (US) 54-4 (16.56); 6. Jean-Marc Pontvianne (Fra) 54-2 (16.51); 7. Yaming Zhu (Chn) 53-9¼ (16.39); 8. Tobia Bocchi (Ita) 53-5¾ (16.30).

SP(street; 9/01): 1. Joe Kovacs (US) 74-2¼ (22.61) (69-11½, 74-2¼, f, f, f, 73-9) (21.32, 22.61, f, f, f, 22.48); 2. Tom Walsh (NZ) 70-10½ (21.60) (70-10½, f, f, 68-5, f, f) (21.60, f, f, 20.85, f, f); 3. Jacko Gill (NZ) 69-11½ (21.32); 4. Filip Mihaljević (Cro) 69-4 (21.13); 5. Nick Ponzio (Ita) 69-1¼ (21.06); 6. Tripp Piperi (US) 68-6 (20.88); 7. Armin Sinančević (Ser) 68-4½ (20.84); 8. Josh Awotunde (US) 67-10¾ (20.69).

BRUSSELS WOMEN’S RESULTS

100(0.6): 1. Shericka Jackson (Jam) 10.73; 2. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (Jam) 10.74; 3. Marie-Josée Ta Lou (CI) 10.78; 4. Aleia Hobbs (US) 10.91; 5. Sha’Carri Richardson (US) 10.93; 6. Tamara Clark (US) 11.03; 7. Aminatou Seyni (Nig) 11.15.

400: 1. Fiordaliza Cofil (DR) 49.80 PR; 2. Sada Williams (Bar) 50.15; 3. Cynthia Bolingo Mbongo (Bel) 50.19 NR; 4. Mary Moraa (Ken) 50.67 NR; 5. Candice McLeod (Jam) 50.76; 6. Lieke Klaver (Neth) 50.87; 7. Anna Kiełbasińska (Pol) 51.63; 8. Stephenie Ann McPherson (Jam) 51.73.

1500: 1. Ciara Mageean (Ire) 3:56.63 NR; 2. Laura Muir (GB) 3:56.86; 3. Freweyni Hailu (Eth) 3:56.94; 4. Diribe Welteji (Eth) 3:57.82 (3:08.72);

5. Heather MacLean (US) 3:58.76 PR (AL) (7, x A);

6. Elise Cranny (US) 3:59.61; 7. Winnie Nanyondo (Uga) 3:59.91; 8. Georgia Griffith (Aus) 4:02.96; 9. Ayal Dagnachew (Eth) 4:03.13; 10. Cory McGee (US) 4:04.33; 11. Elise Vanderelst (Bel) 4:04.43; 12. Jessica Hull (Aus) 4:07.20; 13. Marta Pérez (Spa) 4:09.22; 14. Sinclaire Johnson (US) 4:10.29; 15. Axumawit Embaye (Eth) 4:14.69;… rabbits—Noélie Yarigo (Ben) (60.68), Claudia Bobocea (Rom) (2:05.00).

St: 1. Jackline Chepkoech (Ken) 9:02.43 PR (2, 3 WJ) (6:04.90);

2. Werkwuha Getachew (Eth) 9:03.44; 3. Winfred Yavi (Bhr) 9:08.03;

4. Faith Cherotich (Ken) 9:09.63 PR (5, x WJ);

5. Zerfe Wondemagegn (Eth) 9:10.16; 6. Sembo Almayew (Eth) 9:14.31; 7. Luiza Gega (Alb) 9:14.41; 8. Emma Coburn (US) 9:14.43; 9. Daisy Jepkemei (Kaz) 9:20.69; 10. Courtney Frerichs (US) 9:20.93; 11. Beatrice Chepkoech (Ken) 9:24.73; 12. Nataliya Strebkova (Ukr) 9:28.76;… rabbit—Virginia Nyambura (Ken) (3:00.85).

100H(0.1): 1. Jasmine Camacho-Quinn (PR) 12.27 (x, =11 W); 2. Tia Jones (US) 12.38 PR (10, x A);

3. Keni Harrison (US) 12.40; 4. Britany Anderson (Jam) 12.44; 5. Megan Tapper (Jam) 12.51 PR; 6. Devynne Charlton (Bah) 12.66; 7. Pia Skrzyszowska (Pol) 12.81; 8. Nadine Visser (Neth) 12.88.

(best-ever mark-for-place: 3–5)

Field Events

HJ: 1. Yaroslava Mahuchikh (Ukr) 6-8¾ (2.05) out PR, =out NR (WL) (6-2, 6-4¼, 6-5½, 6-6¾ [x], 6-7½, 6-8¾ [2], 6-10¾ WR [xxx]) (1.88, 1.94, 1.97, 2.00 [x], 2.02, 2.05 [2], 2.10 [xxx]);

2. Eleanor Patterson (Aus) 6-4¼ (1.94); 3. Nicola Olyslagers (Aus) 6-3¼ (1.91); 4. Safina Sadullayeva (Uzb) 6-3¼; 5. Marija Vuković (Mont) 6-3¼; 6. Iryna Herashchenko (Ukr) 6-3¼; 7. Elena Vallortigara (Ita) 6-2 (1.88); 8. Yuliya Levchenko (Ukr) 6-2.

Non-DL LJ: 1. Ese Brume (Ngr) 22-5 (6.83); 2. Quanesha Burks (US) 21-5½ (6.54); 3. Larissa Iapichino (Ita) 21-4¾ (6.52); 4. Nafi Thiam (Bel) 21-2½ (6.46); 5. Kate Hall (US) 21-½ (6.41); 6. Noor Vidts (Bel) 21-0 (6.40) PR.

JT: 1. Kara Winger (US) 223-5 (68.11) AR (old AR 221-1/67.40 Maggie Malone [unat] ’21) (WL) (12, x W) (204-11, 195-3, 202-2, 209-4, 202-6, 223-5) (62.47, 59.52, 61.63, 63.82, 61.72, 68.11);

2. Haruka Kitaguchi (Jpn) 208-2 (63.45);

3. Adriana Vilagoš (Ser) 206-8 (63.00) (x, 7 WJ);

4. Kelsey-Lee Barber (Aus) 200-4 (61.07); 5. Liz Gleadle (Can) 196-10 (60.01); 6. Elína Tzénggo (Gre) 196-9 (59.98); 7. Liveta Jasiūnaitė (Lit) 196-2 (59.80); 8. Barbora Špotáková (CzR) 190-4 (58.01); 9. Līna Mūze (Lat) 188-6 (57.46).

Subscription Options

Monthly Subscription
(Digital Only)

  • Access to Current Articles
  • Access to Current Issues
  • eTrack Results Newsletter
  • Unlimited Content from our Technique Journal, Track Coach

$7.95 every 1 month (recurring)

Annual Subscription
(Digital Only)

  • Access to Current Articles
  • Access to Current Issues
  • eTrack Results Newsletter
  • Unlimited Content from our Technique Journal, Track Coach

$79 every 1 year (recurring)

Monthly Premium Archive
(Digital Only)

  • Unlimited Articles
  • Access to Archived Issues
  • eTrack Results Newsletter
  • Unlimited Content from our Technique Journal, Track Coach

$12.95 every 1 month (recurring)

Annual Premium Archive
(Digital Only)

  • Unlimited Articles
  • Access to Archived Issues
  • eTrack Results Newsletter
  • Unlimited Content from our Technique Journal, Track Coach

$128 every 1 year (recurring)

Annual Subscription
(Digital + Print)

  • Access to Current Articles
  • Access to Current Issues
  • eTrack Results Newsletter
  • Unlimited Content from our Technique Journal, Track Coach
  • 12 Monthly Print Issues

$109.00 USA every year (recurring)
$157.00 Canada every year (recurring)
$207.00 Foreign every year (recurring)

Annual Premium Archive
(Digital + Print)

  • Unlimited Articles
  • Access to Archived Issues
  • eTrack Results Newsletter
  • Unlimited Content from our Technique Journal, Track Coach
  • 12 Monthly Print Issues

$158.00 USA every year (recurring)
$206.00 Canada every year (recurring)
$256.00 Foreign every year (recurring)

Annual Subscription
(Print Only)

  • 12 Monthly Print Issues
  • Does not include online access or eTrack Results Newsletter

$79.00 USA every year (recurring)
$127.00 Canada every year (recurring)
$177.00 Foreign every year (recurring)

Track Coach
(Digital Only)

  • Track Coach Quarterly Technique Journal
  • Access to Track Coach Archived Issues

Note: Track Coach is included with all Track & Field News digital subscriptions. If you are a current T&FN subscriber, purchase of a Track Coach subscription will terminate your existing T&FN subscription and change your access level to Track Coach content only. Track & Field News print only subscribers will need to upgrade to a T&FN subscription level that includes digital access to read Track Coach issues and articles online.

$19.95 every 1 year (recurring)