2019 World Championships Women’s Top 10 Predictions

Elaine Thompson & Marie-Josée Ta Lou figure to play big parts in the 100. (GLADYS CHAI/ASVOM AGENCY)

OUR INTERNATIONAL PANEL has crunched all the data, and the overall results say that the U.S. women will experience a meet not as good as the one they had in London 2 years ago. The number of overall medals drops slightly, from 17 to 15, and the number of golds takes a bigger hit, going from 7 to 4.

If a nation is listed with 4 entries that means it has a Wild Card in that event. Any Americans who don’t make the top 10 are listed in alphabetical order at the end of the event. The right-hand column is the athlete’s PR and the year in which it was made (except in the relays, where the mark is the best from this year or last).

Chart updated as of September 26 (this is the final update).

100 METERS
•Look for a 1-2 by the Jamaican pair of Thompson and Fraser-Pryce. They’ve got matching PRs and matching ’19 yearly leaders at 10.73. They’ve only met 4 times in their careers, reigning Olympic gold medalist Thompson having been victorious in all of them… Defending champ Bowie is in on that Wild Card, but has been a shadow of her former self all year, with a seasonal best of just 11.09. Will a month of solid training be enough to bring her around?… Schippers is dealing with a back injury and may skip this one.
1. Elaine Thompson Jamaica 10.70 (’16)
2. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce Jamaica 10.70 (’12)
3. Dina Asher-Smith Great Britain 10.85 (’18)
4. Marie-Josée Ta Lou Côte d’Ivoire 10.85 (’18)
5. Blessing Okagbare Nigeria 10.79 (’13)
6. Tori Bowie USA 10.78 (’16)
7. Dafne Schippers Netherlands 10.81 (’15)
8. Teahna Daniels USA 10.99 (’19)
9. Tatjana Pinto Germany 11.00 (’16)
10. Jonielle Smith Jamaica 11.04 (’19)
Other Americans:
Morolake Akinosun 10.95 (’16)
English Gardner 10.74 (’16)
200 METERS
•This is projecting as the fourth straight Worlds with no Americans on the podium… We don’t see a medal for defending champ Schippers either, as 2-time European champ Asher-Smith and 100 faves Thompson & SAFP stand in her way… Conspicuous in her absence is yearly leader Shaunae Miller-Uibo, who with a double not possible has put all her eggs in the 400 basket.
1. Dina Asher-Smith Great Britain 21.89 (’18)
2. Elaine Thompson Jamaica 21.66 (’15)
3. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce Jamaica 22.09 (’12)
4. Dafne Schippers Netherlands 21.63 (’15)
5. Blessing Okagbare Nigeria 22.04 (’18)
6. Mujinga Kambundji Switzerland 22.26 (’19)
7. Dezerea Bryant USA 22.18 (’15)
8. Crystal Emmanuel Canada 22.50 (’17)
9. Brittany Brown USA 22.42 (’18)
10. Vitoria Cristina Rosa Brazil 22.62 (’19)
Other American:
Angie Annelus 22.16 (’19)
400 METERS
•Miller-Uibo had a solid homestretch lead in ’17, but stumbled in the final stages of the race and ended up 4th. That was the only time she has lost to Naser. Both will be thinking sub-49, but Naser will come in with only a single sub-50 on the year… Defending champ Francis has a seasonal best of only 50.76 and hasn’t been under 51 since June.
1. Shaunae Miller-Uibo Bahamas 48.97 (’18)
2. Salwa Eid Naser Bahrain 49.08 (’18)
3. Shericka Jackson Jamaica 49.78 (‘19)
4. Shakima Wimbley USA 49.52 (’18)
5. Stephenie Ann McPherson Jamaica 49.92 (’13)
6. Phyllis Francis USA 49.92 (‘17)
7. Christine Botlogetswe Botswana 50.48 (’19)
8. Laviai Nielsen Great Britain 50.83 (’19)
9. Justyna Święty-Ersetic Poland 50.41 (’18)
10. Kendall Ellis USA 49.99 (’18)
Other American:
Wadeline Jonathas 50.44 (’19)
800 METERS
•With the 3 Rio Olympic medalists—Caster Semenya, Francine Niyonsaba & Margaret Wambui—out of the 2-lapper because of the IAAFs testosterone restrictions, it’s a brave new world here. Semenya & Niyonsaba also went 1–2 in the ’17 WC… Ignoring the ineligibles, Wilson is undefeated on the year and won a half-dozen DL races, making her a clear favorite to move up from last time’s bronze position… Rogers leads Sharp 3–2 in this year’s meetings and has 4 sub-2:00s to the Briton’s 2… The U.S. has never had a medal better than bronze before and now might get both.
1. Ajee’ Wilson USA 1:55.61 (’17)
2. Raevyn Rogers USA 1:57.69 (’18)
3. Lynsey Sharp Great Britain 1:57.69 (’16)
4. Hanna Green USA 1:58.19 (’19)
5. Natoya Goule Jamaica 1:56.15 (’18)
6. Winnie Nanyondo Uganda 1:58.63 (’14)
7. Olha Lyakhova Ukraine 1:58.64 (’15)
8. Rabab Arrafi Morocco 1:57.47 (’18)
9. Halimah Nakaayi Uganda 1:58.39 (’18)
10. Catriona Bissett Australia 1:58.78 (’19)
Other American:
Ce’Aira Brown 1:58.01 (’18)
1500 METERS
•A 1500/5000 double is impossible, so both Hassan and Klosterhalfen could end up not in this event at all. If Hassan runs here, she will likely be doubling back from the 10,000, where she is also favored. Quite the range for the former Ethiopian, who claimed the mile WR earlier this summer… We know Houlihan can kick with the best of them, but she hasn’t raced since winning a 1500/5000 double at USATF (she is skipping the longer race here)… Kipyegon is the defending champ… Early-season co-favorite Muir had a torn calf this summer and has not raced since July.
1. Sifan Hassan Netherlands 3:55.30 (’19)
2. Shelby Houlihan USA 3:57.34 (’18)
3. Faith Kipyegon Kenya 3:56.41 (’16)
4. Konstanze Klosterhalfen Germany 3:58.92 (’17)
5. Laura Muir Great Britain 3:55.22 (’16)
6. Gudaf Tsegay Ethiopia 3:57.40 (’19)
7. Jenny Simpson USA 3:57.22 (’14)
8. Rabab Arrafi Morocco 3:58.84 (’19)
9. Gabriela DeBues-Stafford Canada 3:59.59 (’19)
10. Winny Chebet Kenya 3:59.16 (’17)
Other American:
Nikki Hiltz 4:03.55 (’19)

 

STEEPLECHASE
•Chepkoech has been on a roll the last couple of years, winning 7 of 8 races (and setting the amazing WR of 8:44.32) in ’18 and 7 of 8 so far this year. And the fellow Kenyan who beat her in Oslo in June didn’t even make the team, all of which adds up to overwhelming favorite… Jepkemoi, the ’15 gold medalist and ’17 bronze medalist, hasn’t won a race all year but broke 9:10 in each of her 4 low-altitude appearances… We wouldn’t expect a repeat of the Coburn-Frerichs 1–2 of 2 years ago, but then, we didn’t expect it then either… Unconfirmed reports have third American Quigley as questionable.
1. Beatrice Chepkoech Kenya 8:44.32 (’18)
2. Hyvin Jepkemoi Kenya 9:00.01 (’16)
3. Emma Coburn USA 9:02.58 (’17)
4. Celliphine Chespol Kenya 8:58.71 (’17)
5. Courtney Frerichs USA 9:00.85 (’18)
6. Daisy Jepkemei Kenya 9:06.66 (’19)
7. Winfred Mutile Yavi Bahrain 9:07.23 (’19)
8. Colleen Quigley USA 9:10.27 (’17)
9. Peruth Chemutai Uganda 9:07.94 (’18)
10. Gesa-Felicitas Krause Germany 9:07.51 (’19)
Other American:
Allie Ostrander 9:31.44 (’19)
5000 METERS
•As in the 1500, doubling problems confuse the picture here, since the 1500 and 5000 finals are on the same night. Hassan will run the 10,000 a week prior and while we were originally led to believe she wouldn’t go for the 5, she has apparently left the door open. What does she want to run in this weather: 3 times in the 1500 or twice in the 5000?… Gidey will also be coming back from the 10, so we’ll give the edge to a fresh Klosterhalfen (who could confuse the picture by choosing the 1500 instead). All of which could open the door for defending champ Obiri. Oh, wait! She’s potentially coming back from the 10 also… Confusing enough for you?
1. Sifan Hassan Netherlands 14:22.12 (’19)
2. Konstanze Klosterhalfen Germany 14:26.76 (’19)
3. Letesenbet Gidey Ethiopia 14:23.14 (’15)
4. Hellen Obiri Kenya 14:18.37 (’17)
5. Lilian Rengeruk Kenya 14:36.80 (’17)
6. Hawi Feysa Ethiopia 14:38.76 (’19)
7. Sheila Chelangat Kenya 14:54.66 (’17)
8. Margaret Chelimo Kenya 14:31.69 (’19)
9. Taye Fantu Ethiopia 14:45.59 (’19)
10. Eilish McColgan Great Britain 14:47.49 (’19)
The Americans:
Elinor Purrier 15:08.61 (’19)
Rachel Schneider 15:06.71 (’19)
Karissa Schweizer 15:01.63 (’19)
10,000 METERS
•Hassan has only run a single track 10,000 in her life and she didn’t break 30:00 (let alone 29:00) in that race, but such are her short-track credentials and overall skills that she rates as No. 1. This will be the start of her double, but will she follow it with the 1500 or 5000?… Gidey stamped herself as the top Ethiopian with her list-leading PR in Hengelo… The Kenyan pair of Tirop & Obiri each own a World XC gold… Reigning OG/WC champ Almaz Ayana, the WR holder, was a late withdrawal from the Ethiopian squad.
1. Sifan Hassan Netherlands 31:18.12 (’19)
2. Letesenbet Gidey Ethiopia 30:37.89 (’19)
3. Agnes Tirop Kenya 31:03.50 (’17)
4. Hellen Obiri Kenya 31:25.38 (’19)
5. Sanbere Teferi Ethiopia 30:40.59 (’16)
6. Emily Sisson USA 30:49.57 (’19)
7. Netsanet Gudeta Ethiopia 30:36.75 (’19)
8. Rosemary Wanjiru Kenya 31:11.79 (’19)
9. Molly Huddle USA 30:13.17 (’16)
10. Minami Yamanouchi Japan 31:16.48 (’19)
Other American:
Marielle Hall 31:37.45 (’16)
100 HURDLES
•Williams was the surprise winner back in ’15, but nobody will be surprised if she wins again this time. She has turned in the 4 fastest times of her career and climbed to No. 7 on the all-time list… WR holder Harrison doesn’t have a great history in this meet, finishing 4th last time out and false starting in her ’15 semi… Amusan has also reached her fastest time ever and slips in ahead of the American duo of 2-time World Indoor champ Ali and former AR holder McNeal… Reigning champ Sally Pearson of Australia retired over the summer with persistent Achilles problems.
1. Danielle Williams Jamaica 12.32 (’19)
2. Keni Harrison USA 12.20 (’16)
3. Tobi Amusan Nigeria 12.49 (’19)
4. Nia Ali USA 12.48 (’13)
5. Brianna McNeal USA 12.26 (’13)
6. Janeek Brown Jamaica 12.40 (’19)
7. Megan Tapper Jamaica 12.63 (’17)
8. Elvira Herman Belarus 12.64 (’18)
9. Annimari Korte Finland 12.72 (’19)
10. Nadine Visser Netherlands 12.71 (’18)
400 HURDLES
•Can we flip a coin? Good cases can be made for both Muhammad and McLaughlin. Muhammad has that big World Record credential of course, while McLaughlin hasn’t even PRed this year (yet?). McLaughlin is ahead 2–1 in their head-to-heads this year and has only lost to Muhammad, while Muhammad also has a loss to Shamier Little (who didn’t make the Doha team). In the final analysis, although Syd The Kid did make the Olympic team, she has never run in an OG or WC final, whereas Muhammad has the Oly gold and a pair of WC silvers… Defending champ Carter hasn’t shown that kind of form so far this year, but ’13 &’15 gold medalist Hejnová is looking more like her old self.
1. Dalilah Muhammad USA 52.20 (’19)
2. Sydney McLaughlin USA 52.75 (’18)
3. Zuzana Hejnová Czech Republic 52.83 (’13)
4. Rushell Clayton Jamaica 54.16 (’19)
5. Léa Sprunger Switzerland 54.29 (’17)
6. Ashley Spencer USA 53.11 (’17)
7. Kori Carter USA 52.95 (’17)
8. Anna Ryzhykova Ukraine 54.35 (’12)
9. Janieve Russell Jamaica 53.46 (’18)
10. Sara Slott Petersen Denmark 53.44 (’16)
800 favorite Ajee’ Wilson figures to move up 2 spots from her ’17 bronze. (KEVIN MORRIS)
MARATHON
•Former Kenyan Salpeter chopped almost 5:00 from her PR with her Prague win in May. Her good track credentials—including winning the Euro 10K title last year—give her the edge over yearly list leader Chepngetich, whose time came on the deceptively fast Dubai course… Kiplagat was the ’11 and ’13 winner (and ’17 silver medalist), but she’s on the cusp of turning 40… Defending champ Rose Chelimo of Bahrain hasn’t broken 2:30 this year.
1. Lonah Chemtai Salpeter Israel 2:19:46 (’19)
2. Ruth Chepngetich Kenya 2:17:08 (’19)
3. Roza Dereje Ethiopia 2:19:17 (’18)
4. Ruti Aga Ethiopia 2:18:34 (’18)
5. Edna Kiplagat Kenya 2:19:50 (’12)
6. Shure Demise Ethiopia 2:20:59 (’19)
7. Visiline Jepkesho Kenya 2:21:37 (’17)
8. Helalia Johanes Namibia 2:22:25 (’19)
9. Mizuki Tanimoto Japan 2:25:28 (’19)
10. Sara Dossena Italy 2:24:00 (’19)
The Americans:
Kelsey Bruce 2:31:53 (’19)
Carrie Dimoff 2:30:53 (’17)
Roberta Groner 2:29:09 (’19)

 

20K WALK
•WR holder Liu slipped to 3rd in the big La Coruña race, won by Morejón in World Junior Record time, but the Chinese vet’s big-race credentials—reigning Olympic gold medalist, WC golds in ’11 &’15—give her the edge. Particularly with the young Ecuadorian having only that single 20 under her belt… The Chinese could well sweep the medals, noting that Yang is the defending champ.
1. Hong Liu China 1:24:38 (’15)
2. Glenda Estefanía Morejón Ecuador 1:25:29 (’19)
3. Jiayu Yang China 1:25:34 (’19)
4. Shenjie Qieyang China 1:25:37 (’19)
4. Hong Liu China 1:25:56 (’16)
5. Mária Pérez Spain 1:26:36 (’18)
6. Anežka Drahotová Czech Republic 1:27:03 (’18)
7. Antonella Palmisano Italy 1:26:36 (’17)
8. Erica de Sena Brazil 1:26:59 (’17)
9. Kumiko Okada Japan 1:27:41 (’19)
10. Eleonora Giorgi Italy 1:27:46 (’19)
The American:
Maria Michta-Coffey 1:30:49 (’14)
50K WALK
•With the 20K being contested just the day before, World Record holder Hong Liu isn’t entered in this one, choosing the Olympic distance instead. China will be well represented in her stead, with Nos. 2 & 3 on the all-time list, Li and Liang, favored to go 1–2 as the 50 makes its second appearance as a WC discipline… Defending champ Henriques is tabbed for 5th.
1. Maocuo Li China 4:03:51 (’19)
2. Rui Liang China 4:04:36 (’18)
3. Eleonora Giorgi Italy 4:04:50 (’19)
4. Julia Takács Spain 4:05:46 (’19)
5. Inês Henriques Portugal 4:09:21 (’18)
6. Paola Pérez Ecuador 4:12:56 (’18)
7. Faying Ma China 4:07:30 (’19)
8. Valentyna Myronchuk Ukraine 4:15:50 (’19)
9. Mária Czaková Slovakia 4:14:25 (’18)
10. Nastassia Yatsevich Belarus 4:16:39 (’19)
The American:
Katie Burnett 4:21:51 (’17)
4 x 100 RELAY
•Germany may seem a strange pick, lacking as it is in individual-event superstars, but the yearly world leaders bring something crucial to the mix: smooth passing… No hints so far as to will be Team USA, but the 4 entries in the 100 (Teahna Daniels, English Gardner, Morolake Akinson & Tori Bowie) are backed up by pool members Dezerea Bryant, Caitland Smith & Kiara Parker. And what about old standby Allyson Felix?… It would be foolish to overlook Jamaica, with its 1–2 punch of Elaine Thompson and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce.
1. Germany 41.67 (’19)
2. USA 42.05 (’18)
3. Jamaica 42.29 (’19)
4. Great Britain 41.88 (’18)
5. Netherlands 42.15 (’18)
6. China 42.50 (’19)
7. Switzerland 42.29 (‘18)
8. Brazil 43.04 (’19)
9. France 42.93 (’19)
10. Trinidad 43.50 (’18)
4 x 400 RELAY
•The U.S. vs. Jamaica battle figures to be tight, but with the U.S. having better depth. The U.S. has plenty of bodies to choose from, starting with the open 400 foursome of Shakima Wimbley, Kendall Ellis, Wadeline Jonathas & Phyllis Francis. The pool adds Courtney Okolo, Jessica Beard and old standby Allyson Felix. And let’s not forget the flat speed of hurdlers Dalilah Muhammad and Sydney McLaughlin.
1. USA 3:24.04(A) (’19)
2. Jamaica 3:24.00 (’18)
3. Poland 3:24.81 (’19)
4. Great Britain 3:26.48 (’18)
5. Canada 3:27.01 (’19)
6. Nigeria 3:25.29 (’18)
7. India 3:28.72 (’18)
8. France 3:25.91 (’18)
9. Australia 3:27.43 (’18)
10. Italy 3:27.32 (’19)
HIGH JUMP
•Sure, Lasitskene loses once in a while, but it tends to be a long time between whiles. The 2-time defending champion, for example, has won 20 of 22 so far in a very busy ’19. Last year was 25 of 26, and, well, you get the picture… Levchenko, who gave the Russian her closest competition in London 2 years ago, finished her pre-Doha season with a PR win… The battle for bronze looks like a 3-way among a collection of performers who have set 2-meter PRs this year… Cunningham hasn’t competed since USATF.
1. Mariya Lasitskene Russia 2.06 | 6-9 (’17)
2. Yuliya Levchenko Ukraine 2.02 | 6-7½ (’19)
3. Vashti Cunningham USA 2.00 | 6-6¾ (’19)
4. Yaroslava Mahuchikh Ukraine 2.00 | 6-6¾ (’19)
5. Karyna Demidik Belarus 2.00 | 6-6¾ (’19)
6. Erika Kinsey Sweden 1.97 | 6-5½ (’15)
7. Iryna Herashchenko Ukraine 1.99 | 6-6¼ (’19)
8. Mirela Demireva Bulgaria 2.00 | 6-6¾ (’18)
9. Nicola McDermott Australia 1.96 | 6-5 (’19)
10. Ella Junnila Finland 1.95 | 6-4¾ (’19)
Other Americans:
Ty Butts 1.92 | 6-3½ (’19)
Inika McPherson 1.96 | 6-5 (’17)
POLE VAULT
•Sidorova and defending champ Stefanídi have already met no fewer than 11 times this year. The Russian has a solid 7–3-1 edge, plus a PR, so she earns the top spot… Newman, with the 6 highest vaults of her career since June, edges Nageotte for the No. 3 spot… ’17 silver medalist Morris is downgraded because of her self-admitted technique problems of late. Should she rectify those in the free month before the WC she could be back challenging for the top spot… Silva was the ’15 winner and also won a bronze last time out.
1. Anzhelika Sidorova Russia 4.91 | 16-1¼ (’19)
2. Katerína Stefanídi Greece 4.91 | 16-1¼ (’17)
3. Alysha Newman Canada 4.87 | 15-11¾ (’19)
4. Katie Nageotte USA 4.91 | 16-1¼(A) (’18)
5. Sandi Morris USA 5.00 | 16-4¾ (’16)
6. Yarisley Silva Cuba 4.91 | 16-1¼ (’15)
7. Robeilys Peinado Venezuela 4.70 | 15-5 (’19)
8. Jenn Suhr USA 5.03 | 16-6 (’16)
9. Holly Bradshaw Great Britain 4.87 | 15-11¾ (’12)
10. Angelica Bengtsson Sweden 4.81 | 15-9¼ (’19)
LONG JUMP
•Reese has an unparalleled collection of big-meet LJ metal, her OG/WC/WIC haul totaling 10: 8 golds and 2 silvers. She looks like she’ll add to it in Doha, but of what color will it be? Mihambo, last year’s No. 1 World Ranker and this year’s list leader, looks poised to take over from the defending champion. They’ve met 4 times in ’19 and the German won them all. Convincingly… Reigning World Indoor champ Ivana Španović is out with an injury… The same-night staging of the long jump Q and the triple jump final make it unlikely Ibargüen would double, particularly suffering from plantar fasciitis.
1. Malaika Mihambo Germany 7.16 | 23-6 (’19)
2. Brittney Reese USA 7.31 | 23-11¾ (’16)
3. Maryna Bekh-Romanchuk Ukraine 6.93 | 22-9 (’16)
4 Ese Brume Nigeria 7.05 | 23-1¾ (’19)
5. Darya Klishina Russia 7.05 | 23-1¾ (’11)
6. Sha’Keela Saunders USA 6.90 | 22-7¾ (’17)
7. Shara Proctor Great Britain 7.07 | 23-2½ (’15)
8. Abigail Irozuru Great Britain 6.86 | 22-6¼ (’19)
9. Yelena Sokolova Russia 7.07 | 23-2½ (’12)
10. Caterine Ibargüen Colombia 6.93 | 22-9 (’18)
Other Americans:
Tori Bowie 6.95 | 22-9¾ (’14)
Jasmine Todd 6.84 | 22-5¼ (’15)
TRIPLE JUMP
•The big question at this point seems to be not if Rojas will successfully defend her title, but if she can claim the World Record in so doing, now that she has ascended to No. 2 on the all-time list, only 3½ inches (9cm) off Inessa Kravets’s ancient mark from the ’95 Worlds… Ibarguën has been bothered by plantar fasciitis and hasn’t tripled since early July… Don’t count out Rickets, who PRed to beat Rojas for the Diamond League crown… Orji has a decent shot at becoming the first U.S. medalist ever here, but it might take an AR to do it.
1. Yulimar Rojas Venezuela 15.41 | 50-6¾ (’19)
2. Caterine Ibargüen Colombia 15.31 | 50-2¾ (’14)
3. Shanieka Ricketts Jamaica 14.77 | 48-5½ (’19)
4. Liadagmis Povea Cuba 14.77 | 48-5½ (’19)
5. Keturah Orji USA 14.72 | 48-3½ (’19)
6. Kim Williams Jamaica 14.64 | 48-½ (’18)
7. Ana Peleteiro Spain 14.73 | 48-4 (’19)
8. Olha Saladukha Ukraine 14.99 | 49-2¼ (’12)
9. Tori Franklin USA 14.84 | 48-8¼ (’18)
10. Patricia Mamona Portugal 14.65 | 48-¾ (’16)
No third American
SHOT
•A breakout year has found Ealey improving her PR by almost a meter and also beating reigning world champ Gong—in Shanghai, no less—in her first-ever DL meet. Gong subsequently bounced back with 4 straight wins to solidify the favorite’s role going in… ’15 gold medalist Schwanitz is recovering from knee problems.
1. Lijiao Gong China 20.43 | 67-½ (’16)
2. Chase Ealey USA 19.68 | 64-6¾ (’19)
3. Christina Schwanitz Germany 20.77 | 68-1¾ (’15)
4. Brittany Crew Canada 19.28 | 63-3¼ (’19)
5. Danniel Thomas-Dodd Jamaica 19.55 | 64-1¾ (’19)
6. Maggie Ewen USA 19.46 | 63-10¼ (’18)
7. Anita Márton Hungary 19.87 | 65-2¾ (’16)
8. Fanny Roos Sweden 19.06 | 62-6½ (’19)
9. Aliona Dubitskaya Belarus 19.21 | 63-¼ (’19)
10. Paulina Guba Poland 19.38 | 63-7 (’18)
Other American:
Michelle Carter 20.63 | 67-8¼ (’16)
DISCUS
•You wanna talk longtime associations? The Cuban pair have met no fewer than 114 (!) times, dating back to ’08. Caballero can claim a 60–53–1 edge total, but Pérez is up 9–5 this year and has a list-leading PR to bolster her claim to the top spot over the ’15 winner… It’s strange to see Perković, twice a gold medalist at both the OG and WC, in the No. 3 slot, but she seems to be fouling a lot this year and hasn’t crossed the 70m benchmark for the first time since ’13. She’s a combined 2–8 against the two Cubans.
1. Yaimé Pérez Cuba 69.39 | 227-8 (’19)
2. Denia Caballero Cuba 70.65 | 231-9 (’15)
3. Sandra Perković Croatia 71.41 | 234-3 (’17)
4. Feng Bin China 65.45 | 214-8 (’19)
5. Kristin Pudenz Germany 64.37 | 211-2 (’19)
6. Valarie Allman USA 67.15 | 220-3 (’19)
7. Nadine Müller Germany 68.89 | 226-0 (’12)
8. Chen Yang China 67.03 | 219-11 (’18)
9. Claudine Vita Germany 66.64 | 218-8 (’19)
10. Shadae Lawrence Jamaica 65.05 | 213-5 (’19)
Other Americans:
Kelsey Card 63.52 | 208-5 (’16)
Laulauga Tausaga-Collins 63.71 | 209-0 (’19)
Hammer favorite DeAnna Price could be the first American woman to win gold in any of the throws. (MIKE SCOTT)
HAMMER
•The first thing one notices here is the absence of 3-time winner Anita Włodarczyk, sidelined by summer knee surgery… The Americans are nonetheless on a bit of a roll here, but 2 podium places in an event in which they’ve never previously medaled? That would be historic… Wang beat Price twice early in the year, but her marks then tailed off while the American’s went on the rise… Price, Berry & Wang are Nos. 4-5-6 on the event’s all-time list.
1. DeAnna Price USA 78.24 | 256-8 (’19)
2. Zheng Wang China 77.68 | 254-10 (’14)
3. Gwen Berry USA 77.78 | 255-2 (’18)
4. Brooke Andersen USA 76.75 | 251-9 (’19)
5. Alexandra Tavernier France 74.84 | 245-6 (’19)
6. Joanna Fiodorow Poland 75.63 | 241-8 (’18)
7. Na Luo China 75.02 | 246-1 (’18)
8. Zalina Petrivskaya Moldova 74.70 | 245-1 (’19)
9. Malwina Kopron Poland 76.85 | 252-1 (’17)
10. Hanna Malyshik Belarus 76.26 | 250-2 (’18)
JAVELIN
•Having won silver in ’15 and bronze in ’17, Lu looks to complete a full set of medals. Last year’s No. 1 World Ranker comes in riding a 12-meet winning streak. Most of those were at home, but her PR claimed the yearly lead and she won the DL Final by more than 2m over Barber. The Aussie is on a roll of her own, having produced the 5 farthest meets of her life… As always, look for upsets in this inconsistent event… Winger could become the highest-placed American ever, supplanting Karin Smith’s 10th way back in ’83.
1. Huihui Lu China 67.98 | 223-0 (’19)
3. Kelsey Barber Australia 67.70 | 222-1 (’19)
3. Tatsiana Khaladovich Belarus 67.47 | 221-4 (’18)
4. Sara Kolak Croatia 68.43 | 224-6 (’17)
5. Christin Hussong Germany 67.90 | 222-9 (’18)
6. Shiying Liu China 67.12 | 220-2 (’18)
7. Kara Winger USA 66.67 | 219-0 (’10)
8. Nikola Ogrodníková Czech Republic 67.40 | 221-1 (’19)
9. Barbora Špotáková Czech Republic 72.28 | 237-2 (’08)
10. Eda Tuğsuz Turkey 67.21 | 220-6 (’17)
Other American:
Ariana Ince 63.54 | 208-5
HEPTATHLON
•The top two are solid, like the men. Multis maven Frank Zarnowski says, “Bronze should go to Bougard, who is one tough cookie.” Kriszán came into the year as a 6390 performer, but improved at both Götzis (6469) and Talence (6619) to firmly put herself in the 3rd-place conversation… Fourth American Kunz got in as the leader of the IAAF Multis Challenge.
1. Nafi Thiam Belgium 7013 (’13)
2. Katarina Johnson-Thompson Great Britain 6813 (’19)
3. Erica Bougard USA 6725 (’18)
4. Xénia Krizsán Hungary 6619 (’19)
5. Verena Preiner Austria 6591 (’19)
6. Ivona Dadic Austria 6552 (’18)
7. Kendell Williams USA 6610 (’19)
8. Nadine Broersen Netherlands 6539 (’14)
9. Maria Huntington Finland 6339 (’19)
10. Géraldine Ruckstuhl Switzerland 6391 (’18)
Other Americans:
Chari Hawkins 6230 (’19)
Annie Kunz 6153 (’19)

THANKS FROM the T&FN staff to those correspondents who aided us in crafting these prognostications: Bob Bowman, Jonathan Berenbom, Sean Hartnett, Richard Hymans, Dave Johnson, Nejat Kök, Kevin Saylors, Jesse Squire & Frank Zarnowski.

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