World Indoor Champs — Men’s Field/Heptathlon

And then there were 23; men who have jumped 28ft, as Miltiádis Tentóglou joined the club. (MARK SHEARMAN)

High Jump: Sang-Hyeok Woo (South Korea) 7-8½

The field was somewhat depleted; a half-dozen performers had cleared 7-6½ (2.30) prior to the meet, but only one — list-leading Sang-Hyeok Woo of South Korea — was in Belgrade.

10 of the field of 12 made the third height, 7-4¼ (2.24), with Donald Thomas, the outdoor world champ back in ’07, bowing out. At 7-5¾ (2.28) there were 6 jumpers clear. Defending champ Gianmarco Tamberi, who had decided to attend only 5 days earlier, was the first to make 7-7 (2.31) with his second attempt, and was followed by Thiago Julio Moura — a PR by 3cm for the Brazilian — with Tamberi the first to give congratulations.

Woo, with a clean slate to 7-7 (2.31), then missed his second jump, and was followed by Loïc Gasch. The Swiss, like Moura, grazed the bar, but it stayed up, and he went into the lead. Hamish Kerr then set a New Zealand Record as the fourth man to get over the height on second time.

Woo had a good clearance on his final chance at 7-7 (2.31), then took his turn at 7-8½ (2.35) after failures by Tamberi and Moura. Woo cleared first time with his ultra-fast approach and highly flexible bar clearance. In so doing Woo became the first Korean ever to win a WC title, indoors or out. /Richard Hymans/

RESULTS

1. Sang-Hyeok Woo (SK) 7-8 (2.34)

(7-2½, 7-4¼, 7-5¾, 7-7 [3], 7-8, 7-9¼ [xxp]) (2.20, 2.24, 2.28, 2.31 [3], 2.34, 2.37 [xxp]);

2. Loïc Gasch (Swi) 7-7 (2.31) PR

(7-½, 7-2½, 7-4¼, 7-5¾ PR, 7-7 [2] PR, 7-8 [xxx]) (2.15, 2.20, 2.24, 2.28 PR, 2.31 [2] PR, 2.34 [xxx]);

=3. Hamish Kerr (NZ) 7-7 (2.31) NR

(7-½ [2] , 7-2½, 7-4¼, 7-5¾, 7-7 [2] , 7-8 [xxx]) (2.15 [2] , 2.20, 2.24, 2.28, 2.31 [2] , 2.34 [xxx]);

=3. Gianmarco Tamberi (Ita) 7-7 (2.31)

(7-½, 7-2½, 7-4¼ [2], 7-5¾, 7-7 [2], 7-8 [xxx]) (2.15, 2.20, 2.24 [2], 2.28, 2.31 [2], 2.34 [xxx]);

5. Thiago Julio Moura (Bra) 7-7 (2.31) NR (7-½, 7-2½ [2], 7-4¼ [2] , 7-5¾ [2] , 7-7 [2] , 7-8 [xxx]) (2.15, 2.20 [2], 2.24 [2] , 2.28 [2] , 2.31 [2] , 2.34 [xxx]);

6. Thomas Carmoy (Bel) 7-5¾ (2.28) =PR (7-½, 7-2½, 7-4¼ [3], 7-5¾ [3], 7-7 [xxx]) (2.15, 2.20, 2.24 [3], 2.28 [3], 2.31 [xxx]);

7. tie, Fernando Ferreira (Bra) & Edgar Rivera (Mex) 7-4¼ (2.24); 9. Norbert Kobielski 7-4¼; 10. Darryl Sullivan (US) 7-4¼ (2.24); 11. Donald Thomas (Bah) 7-2½ (2.20); 12. Naoto Tobe (Jpn) 7-½ (2.15).


Pole Vault: Mondo 20-4 WR

What better way to cap a World Championships than with the greatest vault in human history? Mondo Duplantis won gold for Sweden with a clutch performance over 20-4 (6.20) for a new Absolute World Record.

On a day with too many delays — thanks to a malfunctioning set of standards and a parade of races around the track — Duplantis somehow managed to keep his cool and produce the fourth World Record of his career.

That the 22-year-old phenomenon came to the competition well prepared both physically and mentally was apparent all day. Jumping first in the order, he only took four bars before he got to the record height, nailing them all on his first tries. At 18-4½ (5.60), the other 11 competitors joined him with clearances. At 19-2¼ (5.85), only 3 others were along for the ride: American Chris Nilsen, tied with Mondo for 1st, Brazil’s ’16 Olympic champ, Thiago Braz, in 3rd, and in 4th France’s Valentin Lavillenie, for whom the height was a PR.

Both Duplantis and Braz passed 19-4¼ (5.90), where Nilsen cleared on his second and Lavillenie went out. Then came 19-6¼ (5.95). An easy clearance for the current Olympic champion, a third-try make and South American Record for Braz, and three misses for Nilsen, jumping with his right shoulder taped. The American would secure bronze.

At 19-8¼ (6.00), both Duplantis and Braz passed again, an especially daring move for the Brazilian, whose only successful trip higher than that came in his Olympic win nearly 6 years ago. With the bar moved to a meet record 19-10¼ (6.05), Mondo once again cleared with plenty of air. That equaled the highest en route vault ever, Sergey Bubka having done it on his way to a 20-1¼ (6.14) in ’93.

Braz had the height on his first attempt but brushed off the bar on the way down. He ran through his second try and knocked the bar off more convincingly on his last.

Mondo asked officials for the WR height, which would add a centimeter to his performance on the same runway 13 days ago. Trouble with the standards led to the jump being delayed till after the men’s 4×4. With the green light finally, he ran, his pole veering left after the plant, and he bailed. On his second attempt, he kept the pole straighter, but bailed again.

Then he had to wait once more, this time for the women’s 4×4. With the race concluded — in fact, every other event concluded — all eyes in Belgrade’s Štark Arena fell upon Duplantis, who had been competing for more than 3 hours. He charged down the runway, planted and flew. He nailed the height, brushing the bar with his knees and thighs enough to leave it bouncing. Then he leaped over the photographers, kissed his girlfriend and danced the traditional Serbian Kolo as part of his celebration.

“I don’t understand what just happened, but I’m happy as hell,” he said. “After I set the record, I blacked out. I don’t really remember what I did after I managed it. This was my biggest goal when I was younger, to win the World Championship and break the World Record at a championship and now that dream has come true.” /Jeff Hollobaugh/

RESULTS

1. Mondo Duplantis (Swe) 20-4 (6.20) WR, Absolute WR (old records 20-3¾/6.19 Duplantis ’22)

(18-4½, 19-2¼, 19-6¼, 19-10¼, 20-4 [3]) (5.60, 5.85, 5.95, 6.05, 6.20 [3]);

2. Thiago Braz (Bra) 19-6¼ (5.95) NR

(18-4½, 18-10¼, 19-2¼ [2], 19-6¼ [3] NR, 19-10¼ [xxx]) (5.60, 5.75, 5.85 [2], 5.95 [3] NR, 6.05 [xxx]);

3. Chris Nilsen (US) 19-4¼ (5.90)

(17-10½, 18-4½, 18-10¼, 19-2¼, 19-4¼ [2], 19-6¼ [xxx]) (5.45, 5.60, 5.75, 5.85, 5.90 [2], 5.95 [xxx]);

4. Valentin Lavillenie (Fra) 19-2¼ (5.85) PR

(17-10½, 18-4½, 18-10¼ [2], 19-2¼ [2] PR, 19-4¼ [xxx]) (5.45, 5.60, 5.75 [2], 5.85 [2] PR, 5.90 [xxx]);

=5. Ben Broeders (Bel) 18-10¼ (5.75)

(17-10½, 18-4½, 18-10¼, 19-2¼ [xxp], 19-4¼ [x]) (5.45, 5.60, 5.75, 5.85 [xxp], 5.90 [x]);

=5. Menno Vloon (Neth) 18-10¼ (5.75)

(17-10½, 18-4½, 18-10¼, 19-2¼ [xxx]) (5.45, 5.60, 5.75, 5.85 [xxx]);

7. Kurtis Marschall (Aus) 18-10¼ (5.75)

(17-10½ [2], 18-4½, 18-10¼, 19-2¼ [xxx]) (5.45 [2], 5.60, 5.75, 5.85 [xxx]);

8. Sondre Guttormsen (Nor) 18-10¼ (5.75)

(17-10½, 18-4½ [3], 18-10¼, 19-2¼ [xxx]) (5.45, 5.60 [3], 5.75, 5.85 [xxx]);

9. Oleg Zernikel (Ger) 18-10¼ (5.75)

(17-10½ [2], 18-4½, 18-10¼ [3], 19-2¼ [xxx]) (5.45 [2], 5.60, 5.75 [3], 5.85 [xxx]);

=10. KC Lightfoot (US) 18-4½ (5.60)

(17-10½, 18-4½, 18-10¼ [xxx]) (5.45, 5.60, 5.75 [xxx]);

=10. Pål Haugen Lillefosse (Nor) 18-4½ (5.60)

(17-10½, 18-4½, 18-10¼ [xxx]) (5.45, 5.60, 5.75 [xxx]);

12. Thibaut Collet (Fra) 18-4½ (5.60)

(17-10½, 18-4½ [2], 18-10¼ [xxx]) (5.45, 5.60 [2], 5.75 [xxx]);

13. Torben Blech (Ger) 18-4½ (5.60) (17-10½, 18-4½ [3], 18-10¼ [xxx]) (5.45, 5.60 [3], 5.75 [xxx]).


Long Jump: Miltiádis Tentóglou (Gre) 28-¾

Reigning Olympic champion Miltiádis Tentóglou celebrated his 24th birthday by producing the best indoor jump in the world for more than 13 years when he flew out to 28-¾ (8.55).

For the stats fans: Tentóglou’s Greek Record moved him to No. 6 on the all-time indoor list, with the =No. 8 performance.

His 28-footer came in the second round, but he had nearly nailed one with the very first jump of the competition, landing around that distance only to get a red light — with the newly-introduced method of having a laser beam to eliminate foul jumps being used.

Taking his run up back to the edge of the inside of the track in Belgrade’s Štark Arena, he made no mistake with his next effort and from that point it was just a question of how far away his rivals were going to finish.

In the final round, with the gold medal confirmed, he also reached 27-11 (8.51).

In the battle for the other places on the podium, the third round saw the two U.S. representatives move up into the medal positions.

First, ’16 winner Marquis Dendy flew out to an AL of 27-1¾ (8.27) and, shortly afterwards, Jarrion Lawson landed at 26-10½ (8.19).

Neither man could improve but with his sixth and final effort, Sweden’s Thobias Montler added 7cm to his NR with 27-6 (8.38). So for the second successive WIC Dendy and Lawson finished 3rd and 4th.
/Phil Minshull/

RESULTS

1. Miltiádis Tentóglou (Gre) 28-¾ (8.55) NR (WL) (6, =8 W)

(f, 28-¾, f, 27-1¼, p, 27-11) (f, 8.55 NR, f, 8.26, p, 8.51);

2. Thobias Montler (Swe) 27-6 (8.38) NR

(f, 26-8¼, f, f, f, 27-6) (f, 8.13, f, f, f, 8.38);

3. Marquis Dendy (US) 27-1¾ (8.27) (AL)

(f, 25-2¾, 27-1¾, p, f, f) (f, 7.69, 8.27, p, f, f);

4. Jarrion Lawson (US) 26-10½ (8.19)

(f, 26-2¾, 26-10½, 25-8¾, f, f) (f, 7.99, 8.19, 7.84, f, f);

5. Cheswill Johnson (SA) 26-8½ (8.14) PR

(26-3¾ PR, f, f, 22-7¾, 26-8½ PR, 26-3¾) (8.02, f, f, 6.90, 8.14, 8.02);

6. Emiliano Lasa (Uru) 26-2¾ (7.99)

(26-2¾, f, 25-10¼, 25-6¾, f, 25-5¼) (7.99, f, 7.88, 7.79, f, 7.75);

7. Murali Sreeshankar (Ind) 26-0 (7.92) =NR

(24-10½, 25-11 PR, 26-0 PR, 23-8, 25-8¼, 25-8¾) (7.58, 7.90 PR, 7.92 PR, 7.21, 7.83, 7.84);

8. Lazar Anić (Ser) 26-0 (7.92)

(24-6¼, 25-7½, 25-11, f, 25-6¾, 26-0) (7.47, 7.81, 7.90, f, 7.79, 7.92);

9. Samory Fraga (Bra) 25-10 (7.87) PR

(24-6½, 25-10 PR, 25-9½) (7.48, 7.87 PR, 7.86);

10. José Luís Mandros (Per) 25-7½ (7.81)

(f, 25-7½, 24-6¼) (f, 7.81, 7.47);

11. Kristian Pulli (Fin) 25-5½ (7.76)

(f, f, 25-5½) (f, f, 7.76);

12. Filippo Randazzo (Ita) 25-4¾ (7.74)

(25-4¾, 18-10, f) (7.74, 5.74, f);

…3f—Yuki Hashioka (Jpn), Maykel D. Massó (Cub).

Belgrade’s first gold medal went to Cuban triple jumper Lázaro Martínez. (MARK SHEARMAN)

Triple Jump: Lázaro Martínez (Cuba) 57-10½

Cuba’s 2-time world Junior (U20) champion Lázaro Martínez got his first major international title in the senior ranks when he bounded out to 57-10½ (17.64) with his opening effort — just the second jump in the competition — to take the very first title to be decided.

Martínez, 24, added more than a foot to his previous lifetime best, indoors or out, his PR prior to arriving in the Serbian capital being 56-8½ (17.28).

For good measure he also jumped 57-9¾ (17.62) in the fourth round to emphasize his domination.

Behind the Cuban, Olympic champion Pedro Pablo Pichardo jumped successive Portuguese Records of 57-2 (17.42) and 57-3½ (17.46) in the first and second stanzas but his challenge for gold dissolved when he slightly injured himself with his fourth attempt and he had to pass his final two.

U.S. champion Donald Scott, now 30, finally got to stand on a major champs podium when he returned to 56-feet-plus form indoors for the first time in more than two years with a U.S.-leading 56-5¾ (17.21), his second best jump under cover, in the third round.

However, Scott had a few nervous moments before securing his bronze as ’12 & ’18 winner Will Claye had jumps of 56-1¼ (17.10), 56-3¼ (17.15) and 56-4¾ (17.19) in rounds 3-5. /Phil Minshull/

RESULTS

1. Lázaro Martínez (Cub) 57-10½ (17.64) PR (WL)

(57-10½, 55-11, 56-10, 57-9¾, p, 51-8½) (17.64, 17.04, 17.32, 17.62, p, 15.76);

2. Pedro Pablo Pichardo (Por) 57-3½ (17.46) NR

(57-2 NR, 57-3½ NR, f, 49-¼, p, p) (17.42, 17.46, f, 14.94, p, p);

3. Donald Scott (US) 56-5¾ (17.21) (AL)

(54-8, 55-1½, 56-5¾, 56-4½, 55-11¾, f) (16.66, 16.80, 17.21, 17.18, 17.06, f);

4. Will Claye (US) 56-4¾ (17.19) (55-11¼ [AL], 55-4¼, 56-1¼ [AL], 56-3¼, 56-4¾, 55-9) (17.05, 16.87, 17.10, 17.15, 17.19, 16.99);

5. Jah-Nhai Perinchief (Ber) 55-7½ (16.95) PR

(f, 53-8¼, 55-7½, f, 54-5¼, f) (f, 16.36, 16.95, f, 16.59, f);

6. Melvin Raffin (Fra) 54-8¾ (16.68)

(54-1, 51-8½, f, 48-7½, f, 54-8¾)

(16.48, 15.76, f, 14.82, f, 16.68);

7. Jean-Marc Pontvianne (Fra) 54-6½ (16.62)

(f, 54-6½, f, f, p, p) (f, 16.62, f, f, p, p);

8. Nazim Babayev (Aze) 54-3¾ (16.55)

(53-5½, 54-3¾, f, f, f, f) (16.29, 16.55, f, f, f, f);

9. Tiago Pereira (Por) 54-0 (16.46)

(f, 52-8, 54-0) (f, 16.05, 16.46);

10. Yasser Triki (Alg) 53-10½ (16.42)

(50-0, 53-10½, 44-6¼) (15.24, 16.42, 13.57);

11. Alexsandro Melo (Bra) 52-8¾ (16.07)

(52-8¾, f, f) (16.07, f, f);

12. Nikólaos Andrikópoulos (Gre) 52-8 (16.05)

(52-8, f, 51-7¾) (16.05, f, 15.74);

… dnc—Levon Aghasyan (Arm).


Shot: Darlan Romani (Brazil) 73-11 WL

Beating WR holder Ryan Crouser in the shot is a big order these days. So is beating Kiwi great Tom Walsh. Beating them both at once is nigh-on an impossibility — but somebody forgot to tell Darlan Romani.

The 30-year-old Brazilian opened his day with NRs of 71-4 (21.74) and 71-6 (21.79), but on a day where Crouser (73-7½/22.44) and Walsh (73-1¾/22.29) were some 2ft ahead he didn’t generate a lot of notice. Until round 3 that is.

Setting up in the back of the ring, his eyes fiercely focused, Romani whirled across the circle and unleashed a biggie that found him hopping in joy. His 73-11 (22.53) was the year’s farthest throw, moving him to No. 4 on the all-time indoor list.

Crouser responded with a 73-2¾ (22.32) in round 4 and Walsh matched his NR with 73-2½ (22.31) in 5, but the win was Romani’s. The last time he had beaten both was when he set his outdoor PR in a surprise win at the ’19 Pre DL.

Overall it was one of the deepest competitions ever, 6 men cracking the 71-foot barrier for the first time ever, indoors or out. /Garry Hill/

RESULTS

1. Darlan Romani (Bra) 73-11 (22.53) NR (WL) (4, 9 W)

(71-4 NR, 71-6 NR, 73-11 NR, 69-11, f, 72-9¼) (21.74, 21.79, 22.53, 21.31, f, 22.18);

2. Ryan Crouser (US) 73-7½ (22.44) (x, 10 A)

(73-7½, 70-8½, 71-8¾, 73-2¾, f, 71-11½) (22.44, 21.55, 21.86, 22.32, f, 21.93);

3. Tom Walsh (NZ) 73-2½ (22.31) =NR

(73-1¾, f, 71-5½, f, f, 73-2½) (22.29, f, 21.78, f, f, 22.31);

4. Filip Mihaljević (Cro) 71-7½ (21.83)

(70-7, 69-¾, f, 71-7½, 69-0, 71-6¾) (21.51, 21.05, f, 21.83, 21.03, 21.81);

5. Josh Awotunde (US) 71-2½ (21.70)

(68-½, 70-3, 71-2½, f, f, f) (20.74, 21.41, 21.70, f, f, f);

6. Zane Weir (Ita) 71-1¼ (21.67) NR

(70-¼, f, f, f, f, 71-1¼) (21.34, f, f, f, f, 21.67);

7. Nick Ponzio (Ita) 69-10¾ (21.30) (f, 69-4¾, f, f, 67-8¾, 69-10¾) (f, 21.15, f, f, 20.64, 21.30);

8. Mesud Pezer (Bos) 68-8½ (20.94)

(67-8¾, 68-8½, f, f, f, 67-11) (20.64, 20.94, f, f, f, 20.70);

9. Michał Haratyk (Pol) 68-6

(20.88) (f, 67-0, 68-6) (f, 20.42, 20.88);

10. Konrad Bukowiecki (Pol) 68-2½ (20.79)

(64-11¼, 68-2½, f) (19.79, 20.79, f);

11. Asmir Kolašinac (Ser) 67-8¾ (20.64)

(67-8¾, f, f) (20.64, f, f);

12. Wictor Petersson (Swe) 66-8½ (20.33)

(66-8½, f, f) (20.33, f, f);

13. Bob Bertemes (Lux) 65-11½ (20.10)

(65-11½, f, f) (20.10, f, f);

14. Tomáš Staněk (CzR) 65-4¾ (19.93)

(f, 65-4¾, f) (f, 19.93, f);

15. Francisco Belo (Por) 65-2¼ (19.87)

(65-2¼, f, f) (19.87, f, f);

16. Scott Lincoln (GB) 64-5¾ (19.65)

(63-5, 63-9¾, 64-5¾) (19.33, 19.45, 19.65);

17. Andrei Toader (Rom) 64-3¾ (19.60)

(62-8, 64-3¾, 63-5) (19.10, 19.60, 19.33);

… 3f—Tajinderpal Singh (Ind).

(best-ever mark-for-place: 6, 9, 12)

Darlan Romani pulled off the rare feat of beating both Ryan Crouser & Tom Walsh. (MARK SHEARMAN)

Heptathlon: Damian Warner (Canada) 6489 WL

American Garrett Scantling and Simon Ehammer of Switzerland, who headed up the yearly list, were expected to be the main contenders along with Olympic gold medalist Damian Warner of Canada and Aussie bronze medalist Ash Moloney. Those 4 topped the 60, with Warner running 6.68 to win the main heat, while Moloney, in his first ever indoor race, won the other with 6.70. Ehammer ran 6.72 and Scantling 6.84 as all set PRs.

Ehammer, a 26-11¾ (8.22) jumper, reached 26-4½ (8.04), but was edged by Warner’s 26-5 (8.05). Scantling reached a seasonal best of 24-3½ (7.40), but lost ground to Moloney’s 25-8 (7.82), and then made a fine comeback in the shot, reaching 53-8½ (16.37), almost a meter and half ahead of the main contenders, and the American cleared 6-8¾ (2.05) in the HJ, an event won by countryman Steven Bastien with 6-9¾ (2.08).

At the end of Day 1 Warner, who only cleared 6-6¼ (1.99) in the HJ, led by just 2 points from Ehammer’s 3647, while Moloney (3551) was in a similar duel with Scantling (3546).

Day 2’s hurdles began without Scantling, who had succumbed to food poisoning. Warner won the event in a PR 7.61 despite almost falling sideways, but lost the lead to Ehammer in the vault when the Swiss cleared 16-8¾ (5.10) to the Canadian’s 16-¾ (4.90).

With one event remaining Ehammer was now leading 5634–5611. Warner ran 2:39.56 to score 6489 to move to No. 2 all-time behind Ashton Eaton. That improved his PR from 6343 when 2nd in the previous WIC. Ehammer (2:53.54) was almost caught by Moloney (2:43.01), scoring 6363 to 6344. /Richard Hymans/

RESULTS

1. Damian Warner (Can) 6489 NR (WL) (2, 5 W)

(6.68, 26-5/8.05, 48-10¼/14.89, 6-6¼/1.99, 7.61, 16-¾/4.90, 2:39.56);

2. Simon Ehammer (Swi) 6363 NR

(6.72, 26-4½/8.04, 46-8¼/14.23, 6-8¾/2.05, 7.75, 16-8¾/5.10, 2:53.54);

3. Ash Moloney (Aus) 6344 NR

(6.70, 25-8/7.82, 45-7/13.89, 6-7½/2.02, 7.88, 16-8¾/5.10, 2:43.01);

4. Hans-Christian Hausenberg (Est) 6191 PR

(6.86, 26-1½/7.96, 44-8¼/13.62, 6-7½/2.02, 7.99, 17-4½/5.30, 2:57.10);

5. Andri Oberholzer (Swi) 6099 PR

(7.00, 24-10/7.57, 48-5¼/14.76, 6-6¼/1.99, 8.12, 16-4¾/5.00, 2:43.61);

6. Steven Bastien (US) 6074 PR

(6.94, 24-9¾/7.56, 43-3¼/13.19, 6-9¾/2.08, 8.14, 15-5/4.70, 2:37.89);

7. Jorge Ureña (Spa) 6049

(6.95, 24-¾/7.33, 45-7¼/13.90, 6-8¾/2.05, 7.98, 15-9/4.80, 2:42.28);

8. Lindon Victor (Grn) 6029 NR

(6.91, 24-9¾/7.56, 51-4¼/15.65, 6-8¾/2.05, 8.41, 15-5/4.70, 2:48.21);

9. Karel Tilga (Est) 5964

(7.07, 24-9/7.54, 50-4¾/15.36, 6-7½/2.02, 8.39, 14-9/4.50, 2:39.28);

10. Dario Dester (Ita) 5929

(7.01, 23-11½/7.30, 46-½/14.03, 6-5/1.96, 8.12, 16-¾/4.90, 2:43.49);

… dnf—Kai Kazmirek (Ger)

(7.22, 22-9¾/6.95, 43-11¾/13.40, dnc);

Garrett Scantling (US)

(6.84, 24-3½/7.40, 53-8½/16.37, 6-7½/2.02, dnc). ◻︎

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