Paris DL — The Schedule Gets Crowded

Busy sprinters: Fred Kerley beat Kenny Bednarek in the 200 as they competed in their third DL races in just over a week. (JIRO MOCHIZUKI/IMAGE OF SPORT)

PARIS, FRANCE, August 28 — Wrapping up a rush of three post-Tokyo Diamond League meets inside 8 days, the return to Paris after 2 years saw three Tokyo gold medalists underscore their bona fides after losses.

That’s exactly what Olympic 110H podium topper Hansle Parchment delivered, exacting some retribution against Devon Allen for the defeat delivered by the American 2 days ago in Lausanne.

At the Swiss DL stop in his first post-Tokyo race, Parchment had raced in the thick of it with hurdle-knocking Allen until very near the end when the Olympic 4th-placer hauled across the line in 13.07w and the Jamaican packed it in for 8th (13.58w).

In their meeting here, Allen and Parchment — adjacent in lanes 5 and 6 — dueled close along with Daniel Roberts in 2 before the Jamaican seized an advantage over the last six barriers. Allen toppled No. 10 and Parchment crossed the line in 13.03 — 0.01 faster than his Tokyo winner and his fastest since ’15. Allen’s 13.08 finish was the No. 2 time of his career, inferior only to his 13.03 OT winner in ’16.

“I still have a feeling that I could execute a little bit better but I am happy for the win,” Parchment said. “In the last part, I did not maintain the technique enough — I was leaning a bit more than I was supposed to — but otherwise it was enough. I always believe in myself. The races cannot always be perfect. There will be mistakes so I do not worry about that and stayed confident after Lausanne, ready for this challenge.

“I want to sharpen up my technique before the last races to produce better times.

Parchment has a target, getting into the territory that saw him race 12.94 in Paris 7 years ago: “For me, it is important to go under 13. I think it helps that I study the psychology. I try to surround myself with the people who always try to remind me the things I need to focus on.”

Mondo Duplantis, too, made up for a finish outside the win column in Lausanne — just his second loss in 30 meets since Sam Kendricks got his number at the ’19 World Championships.

Missing three times at his second height in Lausanne, Duplantis had finished a rare 4th. Here he verged on wandering into a bind at his fourth height, 19-4¾ (5.91), when with just three still alive in the comp Ernest John Obiena happily went over the bar — a 1¾-inch (4cm) PR for the Filipino — on first try and Mondo missed.

Chris Nilsen, too, failed on first and so the Tokyo silver medalist joined Mondo in moving on to 19-6½ (5.96). After Obiena ran through his first attempt and Nilsen clobbered the bar on his, Mondo skyed over, and pointed back down the runway with a cat-that-ate-the-canary smile, albeit a friendly one since that’s how the vaulters roll.

Nilsen managed not to negotiate his remaining try at the height, and Obiena, after missing his second attempt and with his placing a near foregone conclusion, opted to take his last chance at 19-8½ (6.01).

He missed, Mondo rocketed over on first, and with normal service restored, took three credible shots at raising his World Record to 20-3¾ (6.19). Credible, for sure. Clearances, not.

In any case, “I felt good,” Mondo said. “I felt like it was really important for me to come back and try to get into the victory mode again, to try to get over 6m. Especially after the competition in Lausanne, it was very important to do what I did today.

“The 6.19, it is a very high bar. You have to have a perfect jump there. I feel like I am jumping really good. I felt like I will have some close attempts right now. But it has to be perfect. It is not that I am scared but it is that I have a lot of respect for the height — because I know how hard it is.”

After repeat-winning both sprints in Tokyo and dropping what most statisticians believe to have been the fastest legal-wind 100 ever at the Pre Classic, Elaine Thompson-Herah, 6 days post-Eugene, had also come out a loser in Lausanne — in the 100 to Jamaican super-rival Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce. The result marked ETH’s first loss in 7 sprint finals since she produced a pair of 3rds at the Jamaican Trials in June.

Here Thompson-Herah lined up in the 100 with SAFP absent citing sore hamstrings. The field was otherwise high quality, although devoid of Americans. She started crisply and by 20m had the advantage over Olympic bronze medalist Shericka Jackson to her left and Euro champ Dina Asher-Smith to her right. In control thereafter, ETH streaked across the finish stripe in a meet record 10.72, 2m ahead of Jackson (10.97). Asher-Smith placed 3rd in 11.06.

“I am thankful I crossed the line healthy,” Thompson-Herah declared. “I am already in the books so I am happy for that. I am just focusing on myself — on my start, on my execution and to be confident over the line. Obviously, it is more about the time after all these events, and my health always comes first.

“I know everybody is thinking I am targeting the World Record, but… I know it is close but for this season I am already super happy.”

Other events saw the Tokyo scripts flipped, with winners taking the scalps of Olympic gold medalists.

Bronze medalist Benjamin Kigen managed it in the men’s steeple, leading a Kenyan sweep of the first 3 places in world-leading time, 8:07.12.

An unfortunate and painful looking accident at the first barrier unfortunately removed Tokyo winner Soufiane El Bakkali from the field. Running in heavy traffic (17 competitors and a pair of pacers), the Moroccan whacked his trail leg against the wood, tumbled in a heap and may have caught a competitors spike in the same leg. Bakkali was moved off the track immediately but most of the race had passed before medics deemed it advisable to wheelchair him from the infield.

With Kigen, Abraham Kibiwot and Leonard Bett clear of their pursuers after 2K, 20-year-old Bett surged on the penultimate homestretch. Quickly Kigen closed the gap and powered home imperious over the last 300. Kibiwot, also a Tokyo finalist, forged into 2nd over the last waterjump. Kibiwot was timed in 8:09.34, Bett in 8:10.21.

In the women’s high jump Nicola McDermott turned the tables on Mariya Lasitskene scaling 6-6 (1.98) on first try while the Russian needed 3. Neither got over 6-7 (2.01) and the Tokyo gold–silver order was reversed.

Sandra Perković, winner at the two Olympics before Tokyo, won the women’s discus anyway one sliced it, reaching 216-9 (66.08) in frame 2. Tokyo champion Valarie Allman placed 3rd. The American hit her best, 211-7 (64.51), in the DL-rules final-round throwoff but it was shorter than world champ Yaimé Pérez’s longest cast in the first 5 rounds and the Cuban’s 214-3 (65.31) answer in the last frame.

Pre Classic 2M winner Francine Niyonsaba’s time to capture the 3000, 8:19.08, made the Burundian the No. 3 performer all-time in her first race at the distance. Ejgayehu Taye kicked hard over the final 200 in a futile effort to catch Niyonsaba yet moved to No. 4 all-time with her 8:19.52 Ethiopian Record.

The men’s 200 was a spirited battle of silver medalists that saw the lead see-saw back and forth on the straight until Fred Kerley notched his first victory of the season over Kenny Bednarek, both timed in 19.79.

Century silver medalist Kerley may have taken the cake but Bednarek’s clocking was his tenth legal sub-20 of the year — a record total.

Kerley’s PR time also moved him to No. 5 on the all-time combo 1/2/4 sprinters list, trailing only Usain Bolt, Michael Johnson, Michael Norman and Wayde van Niekerk.


PARIS MEN’S RESULTS

Non-DL 100(0.7): 1. Marvin Bracy (US) 10.04; 2. Nigel Ellis (Jam) 10.14; 3. Arthur Gue Cissé (CI) 10.17; 4. Jimmy Vicaut (Fra) 10.19; 5. Julian Forte (Jam) 10.21; 6. Mickael-Méba Zeze (Fra) 10.22; 7. Cejhae Greene (Ant) 10.26.

200(1.6): 1. Fred Kerley (US) 19.79 PR; 2. Kenny Bednarek (US) 19.79; 3. Aaron Brown (Can) 20.20; 4. Yancarlos Martinez (DR) 20.22; 5. Isaac Makwala (Bot) 20.26; 6. Josephus Lyles (US) 20.37; 7. Eseosa Desalu (Ita) 20.41; 8. Mouhamadou Fall (Fra) 20.46.

800: 1. Wycliffe Kinyamal (Ken) 1:43.94; 2. Ferguson Rotich (Ken) 1:44.45; 3. Marco Arop (Can) 1:44.74; 4. Peter Bol (Aus) 1:44.88; 5. Elliot Giles (GB) 1:44.92; 6. Gabriel Tual (Fra) 1:45.05; 7. Amel Tuka (Bos) 1:45.37; 8. Adrian Ben (Spa) 1:45.40; 9. Clayton Murphy (US) 1:45.60; 10. Patryk Dobek (Pol) 1:48.37;… rabbit—Patryk Sieradzki (Pol) (50.17).

St: 1. Benjamin Kigen (Ken) 8:07.12 (WL);

2. Abraham Kibiwot (Ken) 8:09.35 (5:25.97); 3. Leonard Bett (Ken) 8:10.21; 4. Getnet Wale (Eth) 8:13.31; 5. Matt Hughes (Can) 8:13.77; 6. Yemane Hailesilassie (Eri) 8:15.24; 7. Osama Zoghlami (Ita) 8:17.24; 8. Ahmed Abdelwahed (Ita) 8:19.14; 9. Hillary Bor (US) 8:21.02; 10. Abraham Seme (Eth) 8:23.35; 11. Mehdi Belhadj (Fra) 8:34.29; 12. Abdelhamid Zerrifi (Fra) 8:37.97; 13. Topi Raitanen (Fin) 8:42.00; 14. Mohammed Tindoufti (Mor) 8:46.82;… dnf—Fernando Carro (Spa), Soufiane El Bakkali (Mor), Conseslus Kipruto (Ken);… rabbit—Sebastian Martos (Spa) (2:43.57).

110H(0.7): 1. Hansle Parchment (Jam) 13.03; 2. Devon Allen (US) 13.08; 3. Daniel Roberts (US) 13.16; 4. Ronald Levy (Jam) 13.24; 5. Aurel Manga (Fra) 13.40; 6. Andy Pozzi (GB) 13.49; 7. Just Kwaou-Mathey (Fra) 13.50;… fs—Pascal Martinot-Lagarde (Fra).

Field Events

PV: 1. Mondo Duplantis (Swe) 19-8½ (6.01) (18-2½, 18-9½, 19-¾, 19-4¾ [x], 19-6½, 19-8½, 20-3¾ [xxx]) (5.55, 5.73, 5.81, 5.91 [x], 5.96, 6.01, 6.19 [xxx]); 2. Ernest John Obiena (Phi) 19-4¾ (5.91) NR (17-10½ [2], 18-2½, 18-6½, 18-9½, 19-¾ [3], 19-4¾, 19-6½ [xx], 19-8½ [x]) (5.45 [2], 5.55, 5.65, 5.73, 5.81 [3], 5.91, 5.96 [xx], 6.01 [x]); 3. Chris Nilsen (US) 19-¾ (5.81) (17-10½, 18-2½ [2], 18-6½, 18-9½ [2], 19-¾ [2], 19-4¾ [x], 19-6½ [xx]) (5.45, 5.55 [2], 5.65, 5.73 [2], 5.81 [2], 5.91 [x], 5.96 [xx]); 4. Sam Kendricks (US) 18-9½ (5.73); 5. KC Lightfoot (US) 18-9½; 6. Valentin Lavillenie (Fra) 18-6½ (5.65); 7. Piotr Lisek (Pol) 18-2½ (5.55); 8. Ethan Cormont (Fra) 18-2½; 9. Kurtis Marschall (Aus) 17-10½ (5.45); 10. Renaud Lavillenie (Fra) 17-4½ (5.30);… nh—Harry Coppell (GB).

TJ: 1. Yasser Triki (Alg) 56-3¾ (17.16) (56-3¾, p, 44-8, 48-11¾, p, 54-10) (17.16, p, 13.61, 14.93, p, 16.71); 2. Hugues Fabrice Zango (Bur) 55-8¼ (16.97) (53-9¼, 54-7½, 54-8¼, 54-10, 53-7¾, 55-8¼) (16.39, 16.65, 16.67, 16.71, 16.35, 16.97); 3. Tiago Pereira (Por) 54-8 (16.66) (51-11¼, 52-6½, 54-8, 52-10¼, p, f) (15.83, 16.01, 16.66, 16.11, p, f) (DL protocol finish: Zango–Triki–Pereira); 4. Jean-Marc Pontvianne (Fra) 54-6½ (16.62); 5. Chris Benard (US) 54-6 (16.61); 6. Max Heß (Ger) 54-4 (16.56); 7. Tobia Bocchi (Ita) 54-2¾ (16.53); 8. Donald Scott (US) 53-11¼ (16.44); 9. Benjamin Compaoré (Fra) 53-3½ (16.24).

JT: 1. Johannes Vetter (Ger) 286-1 (87.20) (277-3, 283-1, 286-1, 278-9, f, 263-2) (84.51, 86.28, 87.20, 84.96, f, 80.23); 2. Anderson Peters (Grn) 282-1 (85.98) (252-3, 266-3, 282-1, 261-5, 260-4, 278-4) (76.89, 81.17, 85.98, 79.68, 79.35, 84.84); 3. Andrian Mardare (Mol) 280-3 (85.43) (258-11, 258-0, 280-3, p, p, 262-2) (78.93, 78.65, 85.43, p, p, 79.91) (DL protocol finish: Peters–Vetter–Mardare); 4. Jakub Vadlejch (CzR) 279-5 (85.17); 5. Aliaksei Katkavets (Blr) 270-4 (82.40); 6. Vítězslav Veselý (CzR) 264-10 (80.73); 7. Julian Weber (Ger) 263-9 (80.40); 8. Gatis Čakšs (Lat) 262-8 (80.06); 9. Teuraiterai Tupaia (Fra) 255-7 (77.91); 10. Pavel Mialeshka (Blr) 246-2 (75.03).

PARIS WOMEN’S RESULTS

100(1.3): 1. Elaine Thompson-Herah (Jam) 10.72; 2. Shericka Jackson (Jam) 10.97; 3. Dina Asher-Smith (GB) 11.06; 4. Natasha Morrison (Jam) 11.09; 5. Mujinga Kambundji (Swi) 11.12; 6. Daryll Neita (GB) 11.12; 7. Ajla Del Ponte (Swi) 11.12; 8. Alexandra Burghardt (Ger) 11.21.

Non-DL 400: 1. Marileidy Paulino (DR) 50.12; 2. Sada Williams (Bar) 50.30; 3. Allyson Felix (US) 50.47; 4. Femke Bol (Neth) 50.59; 5. Quanera Hayes (US) 50.81; 6. Natalia Kaczmarek (Pol) 51.32; 7. Candice McLeod (Jam) 51.41; 8. Amandine Brossier (Fra) 52.79.

3000: 1. Francine Niyonsaba (Bur) 8:19.08 NR (WL) (3, 3 W) (5:34.46); 2. Ejgayehu Taye (Eth) 8:19.52 NR (4, 4 W); 3. Margaret Kipkemboi (Ken) 8:21.53 PR (10, 11 W); 4. Elise Cranny (US) 8:30.30 PR (AL) (7, 9 A);

5. Fantu Worku (Eth) 8:30.76 PR; 6. Eilish McColgan (GB) 8:31.36; 7. Karoline Bjerkeli Grøvdal (Nor) 8:33.47 PR; 8. Konstanze Klosterhalfen (Ger) 8:36.70; 9. Alicia Monson (US) 8:40.08 PR; 10. Gabriela DeBues-Stafford (Can) 8:44.21; 11. Beatrice Chebet (Ken) 8:44.27; 12. Hanna Klein (Ger) 8:46.01; 13. Nadia Battocletti (Ita) 8:58.12;… rabbit—Kate van Buskirk (Can) (2:48.08).

(best-ever mark-for-place: 2)

100H(1.7): 1. Danielle Williams (Jam) 12.50; 2. Nadine Visser (Neth) 12.58 NR; 3. Megan Tapper (Jam) 12.66; 4. Tobi Amusan (Ngr) 12.69; 5. Gabbi Cunningham (US) 12.86; 6. Christina Clemons (US) 12.96.

400H: 1. Gianna Woodruff (Pan) 54.44; 2. Anna Ryzhykova (Ukr) 54.59; 3. Janieve Russell (Jam) 54.75; 4. Nnenya Hailey (US) 54.78; 5. Viktoriya Tkachuk (Ukr) 54.93; 6. Emma Zapletalová (Svk) 55.61; 7. Paulien Couckuyt (Bel) 56.36; 8. Shamier Little (US) 57.18.

Field Events

HJ: 1. Nicola McDermott (Aus) 6-6 (1.98) (6-2¼, 6-4¾, 6-6, 6-7 [xxx]) (1.89, 1.95, 1.98, 2.01 [xxx]); 2. Mariya Lasitskene (Rus) 6-6 (6-¾, 6-2¼, 6-3½ [2], 6-4¾, 6-6 [3], 6-7 [xxx]) (1.85, 1.89, 1.92 [2], 1.95, 1.98 [3], 2.01 [xxx]); 3. Iryna Herashchenko (Ukr) 6-4¾ (1.95); 4. Eleanor Patterson (Aus) 6-4¾; 5. Yaroslava Mahuchikh (Ukr) 6-4¾; 6. Kamila Lićwinko (Pol) 6-3½ (1.92); 7. Elena Vallortigara (Ita) 6-3½; 8. Laureen Maxwell (Fra) 6-2¼ (1.89); 9. tie, Solene Gicquel (Fra) & Yuliya Levchenko (Ukr) 6-2¼; 11. Inika McPherson (US) 5-11¼ (1.81).

DT: 1. Sandra Perković (Cro) 216-9 (66.08) (f, 216-9, f, 212-3, f, 215-6) (f, 66.08, f, 64.69, f, 65.68); 2. Yaimé Pérez (Cub) 214-3 (65.31) (193-7, f, 193-11, 205-9, 212-3, 214-3) (59.01, f, 59.12, 62.73, 64.69, 65.31); 3. Valarie Allman (US) 211-7 (64.51) (204-11, f, f, f, f, 211-7) (62.47, f, f, f, f, 64.51); 4. Liliana Cá (Por) 204-10 (62.43); 5. Mélina Robert-Michon (Fra) 204-9 (62.42); 6. Denia Caballero (Cub) 203-3 (61.95); 7. Kristin Pudenz (Ger) 202-8 (61.78); 8. Claudine Vita (Ger) 190-7 (58.09); 9. Marike Steinacker (Ger) 177-11 (54.24).

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