The World Cup — Team USA Romps

Paul Dedewo’s PR 44.48 was good for a full-second win in the 400. (MARK SHEARMAN)

London, England, July 14-15—It worked.

The first “Athletics World Cup” turned out to be reasonably successful, in spite of many serious obstacles. The meet, a 2-day scored competition matching teams representing 8 nations, was conceived by the British federation and held at the London Olympic Stadium.

The acknowledged obstacles included the scheduling of the meet in the middle of the Diamond League season and, for some teams, proximity to national championships and/or preparations for next month’s European Championships. It also was held on the same weekend as the finals of the Wimbledon tennis tournament as well as the World Cup of soccer, a much more popular sport in England.

The scheduling affected the quality of the fields; a number of big-name stars, including some of the top Brits, chose not to compete. Their absence may have affected the meet’s attendance, and the conflict with other sporting events certainly did. The stadium was little more than half full on Saturday, and the Sunday crowd was even smaller. Unseasonably warm weather (with temps as high as 88F) may have kept some people home on Sunday as well.

Nonetheless, those who did attend seemed to enjoy what they saw. For one thing, the timetable had each of the 2 sessions filled with 17 events taking only 3 hours, with the running events in a window of less than 3 hours. That was accomplished by having no race longer than 1500m and by limiting the throws and horizontal jumps to 4 attempts per athlete.

A more important element of the spectator appeal was the emphasis on team competition. Athletes’ bibs showed their country, not their name or an arbitrary number. Team standings were regularly updated on the scoreboards, and it was always mentioned that the event winners were scoring “maximum points” for their country. As a result, there were tens of thousands of people sitting in a stadium, virtually every one of whom was cheering for a particular participant in every event, mainly for the Brits.

The impact of all of this was not lost on the athletes. American 800 winner Clayton Murphy said, “To have so many different sporting events happening and still get this big of a crowd is awesome.” Queen Harrison, the captain of the winning Team USA, described it as a “great atmosphere.” She said that she felt very proud to be a member of the first winning team. “We will really want to come back and win it again next year.”

Actually, there appear to be no plans to hold the meet again next year, but renewals in ’20 and ’22 are being discussed. IAAF President Seb Coe was supportive. “I’ve been very clear that I want new things to be tried,” he said. “They are not always going to work out from the word go but that can’t inhibit us. There is a lot of work being done on the calendar and the Diamond League. But while we’re working that out, I didn’t want the sport just to stop doing creative things. We will figure things out. They’ve already had interest in this from other cities. But I’m really pleased UK Athletics have taken up the challenge.”

One of the issues that future editions may have to deal with is the dominance of the U.S. team. After a rocky start on the first day, the Americans started piling up the points. In the end, in spite of the absence of some of the top U.S. athletes and a few sub-standard performances by those who did compete (including yet another relay disaster), the team race was not close. Team USA ended up with 219 points, 57 points ahead of Poland, which edged the hosts for 2nd. Other teams were missing some of their best athletes, too, but even at full strength, they would probably not have been able to overtake the U.S.

Day 1: Team USA Left It Till Late

The Americans started off slowly, and the first U.S. win didn’t come until the last hour of the first day, when Murphy continued his strong comeback season. He took the early lead, then settled into 2nd for most of the race. Poland’s Adam Kszczot, this year’s World Indoor champion, took the lead going into the final turn and held it until about 40m from the line, when Murphy overtook him. The winning time was 1:46.52, with negative splits of 54.6 and 52.9. Said the winner, “It was fun to get back to the team competition because I sort of miss that from college. I will be back tomorrow to cheer on my teammates.”

The meet’s only world-leading mark was Anita Włodarczyk’s 258-4 in the hammer. (MARK SHEARMAN)

The remaining three track events of the first evening all went to Americans. Ashley Henderson got out well in the 100. Double Olympic champion Elaine Thompson closed the gap after a slow start, but couldn’t catch Henderson, whose winning time of 11.07 was just .02 ahead of the Jamaican.

The women’s 4×4 was even closer. After two legs, the U.S. and Jamaica had separated themselves from the field, the two teams almost even at the second handoff. Tiffany James took the lead for Jamaica on the backstretch of the third leg, but Kianna Horton overtook her at the end of the last turn and opened up a lead of a few steps before handing off to anchor Courtney Okolo, the World Indoor champion. Stephanie Ann McPherson, who had won the individual 400 earlier in the evening (with Okolo 5th) steadily closed the gap on Okolo, who moved just wide enough in the homestretch to allow McPherson to challenge her on the inside. The Jamaican was on the verge of victory, but appeared to have dipped prematurely at the finish line, allowing Okolo to claim the win. The U.S. time of 3:24.28 was 0.01 faster than Jamaica’s.

The men’s 4×1 closed the first-day track events with another U.S. win over Jamaica, as anchor Cameron Burrell, running in lane 8, held off Tyquendo Tracey. The winning time was 38.42; the margin of victory was 0.10.

The final U.S. win of the day came in the high jump, which ended after the conclusion of the last running event. USATF champ Jeron Robinson led the competition at every height after he started jumping at 7-1¾ (2.18). He was the only man to clear 7-6 ½ (2.30); after winning, he missed three times at 7-8 (2.34).

A half-dozen other Americans were runners-up on Day 1. U.S. recordholder Kara Winger’s opening javelin throw of 199-3 (60.75) led the competition for the first three rounds. But on her final attempt, South African recordholder Sunette Viljoen threw 202-4 (61.69) and Winger could not match that. Katie Nageotte was tied for the pole vault lead after jumping at 15-4¼ (4.68), but Britain’s Holly Bradshaw then cleared 15-7 (4.75) and relegated a disappointed Nageotte to 2nd.

Two other Americans also came close to victory but were beaten by representatives of Team Poland. Rachel Schneider stayed with the front pack through the first three laps of the 1500 and then took the lead at the 1200 mark, holding it until halfway down the homestretch, when she was passed by Sofia Ennaoui. The winning time was 4:07.66 with Schneider 2nd at 4:08.04. In the men’s triple jump, Donald Scott improved to 54-10¾ (16.73) on his final attempt, but fell a centimeter short of Karol Hoffmann’s winning jump.

The best individual performance of the first day was turned in by Poland’s Anita Włodarczyk, the Olympic and World champion and World Record holder. Her hammer throw of 258-4 (78.74) was the longest in the world this year and was also the only world-leading performance of the two days of competition. “I am really happy to be back competing in London,” she said. “The atmosphere is great.”

Day 2: Team USA Continues To Roll

On Day 2, the U.S. won 6 more events. Two of them came in the vertical jumps. World champion Sam Kendricks captured the vault easily at 19-1½ (5.83) and then attempted 19-10¼ (6.05), which would have been an American Record. None of his three tries were really close. In the women’s high jump, former World Indoor champion Vashti Cunningham, still only 20, outjumped home favorite Morgan Lake, who just turned 21 in May. Cunningham cleared 6-5 (1.96) on her first attempt to clinch the victory.

In the first running event of the evening, Paul Dedewo had a very narrow lead at the halfway mark in the 400. But he ran a strong second turn to take a clear lead, and then ran an even stronger home straight to finish with a PR of 44.48 and a margin of a full second over TCU soph Derrick Mokaleng, representing South Africa. Said Dedewo, “This stadium is amazing. I have heard stories that London is great for track & field and to witness it first hand it’s true.”

Another 1-lap victory was claimed by hurdler Kenny Selmon. Jamaica’s Annsert Whyte led for most of the race, with a clear lead over Selmon and the rest of the field coming off the final turn. But he started to fade as he approached the final hurdle, which he hit. Selmon held his stride and hit the finish line in 48.97, as Whyte faded to 4th.

In the women’s 800, ex-Oregon star Raevyn Rogers, continuing to run well in her first post-collegiate year, was well-positioned throughout the race and had moved into 3rd entering the final turn. At that point, she and Britain’s Adelle Tracey broke away from pack, but coming into the final straight, Rogers pulled away from Tracey and ended up with a decisive win in 2:00.20.

The final American victory came in the last event of the program, the men’s 4×4, which was a runaway from the outset. The Americans led at every exchange and their time of 2:59.78 was more than 3 seconds faster than runners-up Poland.

Two sprinters and two horizontal jumpers finished 2nd in Day 2 competition. Kendal Williams got off to a good start, but was outrun by Tracey, whose winning time of 10.03 (wind +0.3) was a PR. Williams was 0.02 back. In the women’s 200, Jenna Prandini, running in lane 6, led the field coming off the curve, but Olympic 400 bronze medalist Shericka Jackson, next to Prandini in lane 7, ran a powerful last 100 and sealed the win for Jamaica in 22.35 (+0.2), a 10th ahead of Prandini.

In the women’s triple jump, Jamaica’s Shanieka Ricketts upped her PR to 47-11¼ (14.61) on her third attempt. AR holder Keturah Orji, who had led after round 2, responded with a solid 47-10¾ (14.60) but that mark, the No. 5 performance in U.S. history, left her a centimeter short of the win. The men’s long jump runner-up was not as close. Zack Bazile improved from 3rd to 2nd with his final jump of 27-2¾ (8.30). But that left him far short of world champion Luvo Manyonga of South Africa, who had the best individual performance of the day, a remarkable series of 27-11, 27-10, 27-10¾, 27-10¾ (8.51, 8.48, 8.50, 8.50).

There were several other good U.S. performances on both days, and only a few real disappointments, the most painful of which came in the final women’s running event, the 4×1. Leadoff leg Mikiah Brisco was running well, but fell to the track in pain, with a possible hamstring pull, just before the hand-off point. It gave Team USA 0 points, the only event in which the winning team scored less than 3.

The meet had a prize pot of £1.5M (c$2M), of which the U.S. athletes got to divvy up £370,000 (c$490,000) in addition to taking possession of the Platinum Trophy.


WORLD CUP RESULTS

London, England, July 14–15 (attendance 31,392/23,848)

Teams: 1. United States 219; 2. Poland 162; 3. Great Britain 155; 4. Jamaica 153; 5. France 146; 6. Germany 137; 7. South Africa 135; 8. China 81.

MEN’S RESULTS

(7/14—200, 800, 110H, 4×1, HJ, TJ, SP, DT)

100(0.3): 1. Tyquendo Tracey (Jam) 10.03 PR; 2. Kendal Williams (US) 10.05; 3. Simon Magakwe (SA) 10.11; 4. Ojie Edoburun (GB) 10.22; 5. Zhouzheng Xu (Chn) 10.32; 6. Marvin Rene (Fra) 10.35; 7. Lucas Jakubczyk (Ger) 10.38; 8. Remigiusz Olszewski (Pol) 10.42.

200(-1.1): 1. Zhenye Xie (Chn) 20.25; 2. Luxolo Adams (SA) 20.45; 3. Ameer Webb (US) 20.51; 4. Jahnoy Thompson (Jam) 20.84; 5. Mickael-Méba Zeze (Fra) 20.92; 6. Delano Williams (GB) 20.97; 7. Karol Zalewski (Pol) 21.14; 8. Michael Bryan (Ger) 21.45.

400: 1. Paul Dedewo (US) 44.48 PR; 2. Derrick Mokaleng (SA) 45.48; 3. Ludvy Vaillant (Fra) 45.64; 4. Rabah Yousif (GB) 45.88; 5. Rusheen McDonald (Jam) 45.98; 6. Jakub Krzewina (Pol) 46.89; 7. Marvin Schlegel (Ger) 47.35.

800: 1. Clayton Murphy (US) 1:46.52; 2. Adam Kszczot (Pol) 1:46.98; 3. Elliot Giles (GB) 1:47.40; 4. Gabriel Tual (Fra) 1:47.44; 5. Benedikt Huber (Ger) 1:48.52; 6. Rynardt van Rensburg (SA) 1:49.14; 7. Jauavney James (Jam) 1:51.44; 8. Junyi Ma (Chn) 1:53.57.

1500: 1. Marcin Lewandowski (Pol) 3:52.88; 2. Timo Benitz (Ger) 3:53.11; 3. Neil Gourley (GB) 3:53.24; 4. Izaic Yorks (US) 3:53.50; 5. Jerry Motsau (SA) 3:55.00; 6. Simon Denissel (Fra) 3:55.35; 7. Shaojie Wang (Chn) 3:58.60; 8. Kemoy Campbell (Jam) 4:01.06.

110H(1.0): 1. Pascal Martinot-Lagarde (Fra) 13.22; 2. Ronald Levy (Jam) 13.30; 3. Devon Allen (US) 13.36; 4. Antonio Alkana (SA) 13.38; 5. Wenjun Xie (Chn) 13.54; 6. Damian Czykier (Pol) 13.56; 7. Martin Vogel (Ger) 14.08;… dnf—Andy Pozzi (GB).

400H: 1. Kenny Selmon (US) 48.97; 2. Patryk Dobek (Pol) 49.02; 3. Dai Greene (GB) 49.48; 4. Annsert Whyte (Jam) 49.80; 5. Victor Coroller (Fra) 49.96; 6. Joshua Abuaku (Ger) 50.78 PR; 7. Lindsay Hanekom (SA) 54.28.

4 x 100: 1. United States 38.42 (Jeff Demps, Williams, Obie Igbokwe, Cameron Burrell);

2. Jamaica 38.52 (Javoy Tucker, Nesta Carter, Kenroy Anderson, Tracey);

3. South Africa 38.53 (Antonio Alkana, Magakwe, Roscoe Engel, Adams);

4. Germany 38.56 (Bryan, Patrick Domogala, Roy Schmidt, Aleixo Platini Menga);

5. France 38.61 (Zeze, Rene, Stuart Dutamby, Mouhamadou Fall);

6. China 38.87 (Haiyang Xu, Jinsheng Liang, Ge Bie, Xu);

7. Poland 38.91 (Krzysztof Grześkowiak, Olszewski, Dominik Kopeć, P Slowikowski);

8. Great Britain 38.97 (Reuben Arthur, Sam Gordon, Andy Robertson, Confidence Lawson).

4 x 400: 1. United States 2:59.78 (AL) (Nathan Strother 45.2, Igbokwe 44.6, Dedewo 44.77, Kahmari Montgomery 45.13);

2. Poland 3:02.80 (Dariusz Kowaluk 46.6, Rafał Omelko 45.2, Mateusz Rzeźniczak 46.16, Karol Zalewski 44.76);

3. Germany 3:03.16 (Johannes Trefz 46.8, Torben Junker 45.1, Fabian Dammermann 46.13, Patrick Schneider 45.09);

4. Jamaica 3:04.96 (McDonald 47.6, Ivan Henry 45.4, Steven Gayle 45.77, Devaughn Baker 46.04);

… dq—France (Thomas Jordier 44.73);

… dq—South Africa (Mokaleng 44.96).

Jumping Events

HJ: 1. Jeron Robinson (US) 7-6½ (2.30); 2. Yu Wang (Chn) 7-5¼ (2.27); 3. Tobias Potye (Ger) 7-4¼ (2.24); 4. Chris Moleya (SA) 7-3 (2.21); 5. Chris Baker (GB) 7-3; 6. Sylwester Bednarek (Pol) 7-1¾ (2.18); 7. Quentin Aboukir (Fra) 6-10¾ (2.10).

PV: 1. Sam Kendricks (US) 19-1½ (5.83) (17-6½, 18-½, 18-6½, 18-10¼, 19-1½, 19-10¼ [xxx]) (5.35, 5.50, 5.65, 5.75, 5.83, 6.05 [xxx]); 2. Raphael Holzdeppe (Ger) 18-10¼ (5.75); 3. Axel Chapelle (Fra) 18-6½ (5.65); 4. Charlie Myers (GB) 18-½ (5.50); 5. Piotr Lisek (Pol) 18-½); 6. Changrui Xue (Chn) 17-6½ (5.35).

LJ: 1. Luvo Manyonga (SA) 27-11 (8.51) (27-11, 27-10, 27-10¾, 27-10¾) (8.51, 8.48, 8.50, 8.50); 2. Zack Bazile (US) 27-2¾ (8.30) (25-8¾, f, 26-6½, 27-2¾) (7.84, f, 8.09, 8.30); 3. Ramone Bailey (Jam) 26-8¼ (8.13); 4. Tomasz Jaszczuk (Pol) 26-5 (8.05); 5. Changzhou Huang (Chn) 26-3½ (8.01); 6. Julian Howard (Ger) 25-5½ (7.76); 7. Yann Randrianasolo (Fra) 25-2½ (7.68); 8. Dan Bramble (GB) 25-¾ (7.64).

TJ: 1. Karol Hoffmann (Pol) 54-11¼ (16.74); 2. Donald Scott (US) 54-10¾ (16.73); 3. Kevin Luron (Fra) 54-8¼ (16.67); 4. Khotso Mokoena (SA) 53-11¼ (16.44); 5. Jordan Scott (Jam) 53-6¼ (16.31); 6. Nathan Douglas (GB) 53-3½ (16.24); 7. Benjamin Bauer (Ger) 50-10 (15.49); 8. Bin Dong (Chn) 50-6¼ (15.40).

Throwing Events

SP: 1. Michał Haratyk (Pol) 72-¼ (21.95) (70-2¼, 71-5¼, 72-¼, 70-9¼) (21.39, 21.77, 21.95, 21.57); 2. Darrell Hill (US) 70-3¾ (21.43) (67-9¾, 69-0, 70-3¾, f) (20.67, 21.03, 21.43, f); 3. O’Dayne Richards (Jam) 65-9½ (20.05); 4. Orazio Cremona (SA) 65-6¼ (19.97); 5. Frederic Dagee (Fra) 64-4½ (19.62); 6. Simon Bayer (Ger) 63-9 (19.43); 7. Scott Lincoln (GB) 63-1½ (19.24).

DT: 1. Fedrick Dacres (Jam) 214-4 (65.32); 2. Victor Hogan (SA) 209-1 (63.73); 3. Lolassonn Djouhan (Fra) 208-3 (63.48); 4. Daniel Jasinski (Ger) 207-3 (63.17); 5. Reggie Jagers (US) 207-2 (63.15); 6. Piotr Małachowski (Pol) 206-7 (62.97); 7. Brett Morse (GB) 195-11 (59.72).

HT: 1. Wojciech Nowicki (Pol) 255-8 (77.94); 2. Nick Miller (GB) 249-10 (76.14); 3. Quentin Bigot (Fra) 246-0 (74.98); 4. Rudy Winkler (US) 235-4 (71.72); 5. Johannes Bichler (Ger) 229-1 (69.82); 6. Tshepang Makhethe (SA) 220-7 (67.23); 7. Caniggia Raynor (Jam) 217-2 (66.20).

JT: 1. Julian Weber (Ger) 271-8 (82.80); 2. Marcin Krukowski (Pol) 263-3 (80.25); 3. Curtis Thompson (US) 247-7 (75.47); 4. Johannes Grobler (SA) 243-8 (74.26); 5. James Whiteaker (GB) 242-5 (73.90); 6. Orlando Thomas (Jam) 231-7 (70.60); 7. Jeremy Nicollin (Fra) 216-3 (65.93).

WOMEN’S RESULTS

(7/14—100, 400, 1500, 400H, 4×4, PV, LJ, HT, JT)

100(0.0): 1. Ashley Henderson (US) 11.07; 2. Elaine Thompson (Jam) 11.09; 3. Carina Horn (SA) 11.21; 4. Bianca Williams (GB) 11.25; 5. Ewa Swoboda (Pol) 11.28; 6. Orlann Ombissa (Fra) 11.28; 7. Yongli Wei (Chn) 11.32; 8. Lisa Marie Kwayie (Ger) 11.46.

200(0.2): 1. Shericka Jackson (Jam) 22.35; 2. Jenna Prandini (US) 22.45; 3. Beth Dobbin (GB) 22.95; 4. Jessica-Bianca Wessolly (Ger) 23.19; 5. Anna Kiełbasińska (Pol) 23.25; 6. Justine Palframan (SA) 23.39; 7. Jennifer Galais (Fra) 23.52; 8. Guifen Huang (Chn) 23.76.

400: 1. Stephenie Ann McPherson (Jam) 50.98; 2. Floria Guei (Fra) 51.84; 3. Justyna Święty-Ersetic (Pol) 51.89; 4. Anyika Onuora (GB) 52.03; 5. Courtney Okolo (US) 52.09; 6. Justine Palframan (SA) 52.36; 7. Lena Naumann (Ger) 53.73.

800: 1. Raevyn Rogers (US) 2:00.20; 2. Adelle Tracey (GB) 2:01.05; 3. Simoya Campbell (Jam) 2:01.59; 4. Christina Hering (Ger) 2:01.86; 5. Anna Sabat (Pol) 2:02.93; 6. Leila Boufaarirane (Fra) 2:06.06; 7. Gena Lofstrand (SA) 2:10.42.

1500: 1. Sofia Ennaoui (Pol) 4:07.66; 2. Rachel Schneider (US) 4:08.04; 3. Jemma Reekie (GB) 4:09.05 PR; 4. Caterina Granz (Ger) 4:10.04; 5. Ophélie Claude-Boxberger (Fra) 4:18.21; 6. Carina Viljoen (SA) 4:29.57.

100H(-0.2): 1. Rikenette Steenkamp (SA) 12.88; 2. Jeanine Williams (Jam) 12.95; 3. Queen Harrison (US) 12.99; 4. Solene Ndama (Fra) 13.02 PR; 5. Karolina Kołeczek (Pol) 13.09; 6. Nadine Hildebrand (Ger) 13.25; 7. Megan Marrs (GB) 13.36.

400H: 1. Janieve Russell (Jam) 55.10; 2. Meghan Beesley (GB) 55.90; 3. Aurelie Chaboudez (Fra) 56.23; 4. Wenda Nel (SA) 56.36; 5. Kymber Payne (US) 56.41; 6. Joanna Linkiewicz (Pol) 56.83; 7. Djamila Böhm (Ger) 57.88.

4 x 100: 1. Great Britain 42.52 (Asha Philip, Imani Lansiquot, Williams, Shannon Hylton);

2. Jamaica 42.60 (Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Jackson, Jonielle Smith, Tissanna Hickling);

3. China 42.94 (Xiaojing Liang, Wei, Manqi Ge, Qiqi Yuan);

4. Germany 43.04 (Kwayie, Alexandra Burghardt, Wessolly, Jennifer Montag);

5. France 43.34 (Estelle Raffai, Stella Akakpo, Galais, Amandine Brossier);

6. South Africa 43.68 (Steenkamp, Tebogo Mamathu, Tamzin Thomas, Horn);

7. Poland 43.82 (Kamila Ciba, Agata Forkasiewicz, Kiełbasińska, Swoboda);

… dnf—United States (Mikiah Brisco [inj], Aaliyah Brown, Dezerea Bryant, Henderson).

4 x 400: 1. United States 3:24.28 (out AL) (Brionna Thomas 51.6, Jasmine Blocker 50.7, Kiana Horton 51.44, Okolo 50.45);

2. Jamaica 3:24.29 (Christine Day 51.8, Russell 50.4, Tiffany James 52.27, McPherson 49.70);

3. France 3:25.91 (Elea Mariama Diarra 52.4, Deborah Sananes 51.8, Cinthia Anais 51.57, Guei 50.14);

4. Poland 3:26.17 (Małgorzata Hołub-Kowalik 51.5, Patrycja Wyciszkiewicz 52.0, Martyna Dąbrowska 51.48, Iga Baumgart 51.12);

5. Great Britain 3:26.48 (Zoey Clarke 52.1, Amy Allcock 51.3, Finette Agyapong 51.69, Emily Diamond 51.34);

6. Germany 3:35.15 (Laura Marx 54.8, Alena Gerken 53.1, Svea Köhrbrück 53.61, Nelly Schmidt 53.46);

7. South Africa 3:43.35 (Palframan 53.5, Gena Lofstrand 56.4, Ariane Nel 57.51, W. Nel 55.82).

Jumping Events

HJ: 1. Vashti Cunningham (US) 6-5 (1.96) (out AL) (5-10½, 6-0, 6-1½, 6-2¾, 6-4 [2], 6-5, 6-6¼ [x], 6-6¾ [xp]) (1.79, 1.83, 1.87, 1.90, 1.93 [2], 1.96, 1.99 [x], 2.00 [xp]); 2. Morgan Lake (GB) 6-4 (1.93); 3. Prisca Duvernay (Fra) 6-0 (1.83); 4. Jossie Graumann (Ger) 6-0; 5. Paulina Borys (Pol) 5-10½ (1.79); 6. Saniel Atkinson Grier (Jam) 5-8¾ (1.75); 7. Julia du Plessis (SA) 5-8¾.

PV: 1. Holly Bradshaw (GB) 15-7 (4.75); 2. Katie Nageotte (US) 15-4¼ (4.68); 3. Ninon Guillon-Romarin (Fra) 15-4¼; 4. Jacqueline Otchere (Ger) 15-1 (4.60) PR; 5. Ling Li (Chn) 15-1; 6. Justyna Śmietanka (Pol) 14-5¼ (4.40);… nh—Christy Nell (SA).

LJ: 1. Lorraine Ugen (GB) 22-6¼ (6.86); 2. Quanesha Burks (US) 21-3¼ (6.48); 3. Tissanna Hickling (Jam) 21-2¾ (6.47); 4. Minjia Lu (Chn) 21-2 (6.45); 5. Rougui Sow (Fra) 20-10 (6.35); 6. Alexandra Wester (Ger) 20-8 (6.30); 7. Magdalena Żebrowska (Pol) 20-1 (6.12); 8. Linque Beneke (SA) 20-¼ (6.10).

TJ: 1. Shanieka Ricketts (Jam) 47-11¼ (14.61) PR (46-10¾, 46-10¾, 47-11¼, 47-9¾) (14.29, 14.29, 14.61, 14.57);

2. Keturah Orji (US) 47-10¾ (14.60) (x, 5 A) (46-7½, 47-7¼, 47-10¾, 47-3) (14.21, 14.51, 14.60, 14.40);

3. Anna Jagaciak Michalska (Pol) 46-2½ (14.08); 4. Jeanine Assani Issouf (Fra) 45-10½ (13.98); 5. Jessie Maduka (Ger) 45-9¼ (13.95) PR; 6. Naomi Ogbeta (GB) 44-2¾ (13.48); 7. Patience Ntshingila (SA) 37-11¼ (11.56).

Throwing Events

SP: 1. Lijiao Gong (Chn) 65-3½ (19.90) (62-1, 64-1, 63-6, 65-3½) (18.92, 19.53, 19.35, 19.90); 2. Paulina Guba (Pol) 63-3½ (19.29) (60-½, 61-¼, 63-3½, 61-9) (18.30, 18.60, 19.29, 18.82); 3. Maggie Ewen (US) 59-9¾ (18.23); 4. Ischke Senekal (SA) 57-6½ (17.54) PR; 5. Amelia Strickler (GB) 56-2 (17.12); 6. Lloydricia Cameron (Jam) 55-5¾ (16.91); 7. Sarah Schmidt (Ger) 55-3½ (16.85); 8. Jessica Cérival (Fra) 52-6 (16.00).

DT: 1. Claudine Vita (Ger) 206-5 (62.92); 2. Xinyue Su (Chn) 205-5 (62.62); 3. Valarie Allman (US) 200-5 (61.10); 4. Jade Lally (GB) 193-4 (58.92); 5. Daria Zabawska (Pol) 186-11 (56.97); 6. Melanie Pingeon (Fra) 183-3 (55.85); 7. Ischke Senekal (SA) 182-3 (55.54);… nm—Shadae Lawrence (Jam).

HT: 1. Anita Włodarczyk (Pol) 258-4 (78.74) (WL) (238-9, 248-7, 258-4, 251-4) (72.78, 75.77, 78.74, 76.61);

2. Sophie Hitchon (GB) 241-1 (73.48); 3. Alexandra Tavernier (Fra) 240-9 (73.38); 4. Na Luo (Chn) 223-11 (68.27); 5. Kathrin Klaas (Ger) 218-6 (66.61); 6. DeAnna Price (US) 212-8 (64.82); 7. Margo Charne Coetzee (SA) 194-0 (59.14) PR; 8. Nayoka Clunis (Jam) 184-11 (56.36).

JT: 1. Sunette Viljoen (SA) 202-4 (61.69); 2. Kara Winger (US) 199-3 (60.75); 3. Huihui Lu (Chn) 198-2 (60.40); 4. Katharina Molitor (Ger) 190-4 (58.03); 5. Alexie Alais (Fra) 175-1 (53.36); 6. Laura Whittingham (GB) 169-9 (51.74); 7. Marcelina Witek (Pol) 164-3 (50.07); 8. Kateema Riettie (Jam) 154-10 (47.21).