Facts, Not Fiction

 
Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst ... 34567 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 66
  1. Collapse Details
     
    #41
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    from an IP that never sent jazz that PM, never !
    Posts
    7,140
    Quote Originally Posted by Merner521 View Post
    I actually think cap gains needs more reforms than the estate tax. Its too easy to avoid, and at the same time it's taxing inflation when you can't avoid it, which seems pretty unfair.
    A very good point, and yet the idea that one person working a 60 hour week can have their salary taxed at a higher rate than another watching his investment gains from the golf course is a perverse reality.
    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
     
    #42
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    20,412
    Quote Originally Posted by user4 View Post
    A very good point, and yet the idea that one person working a 60 hour week can have their salary taxed at a higher rate than another watching his investment gains from the golf course is a perverse reality.
    What if it's a retired person whose investments resulted from working 60-hour weeks for decades?
    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
     
    #43
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    beyond help
    Posts
    12,804
    Quote Originally Posted by Merner521
    The latter only hits estates over $11 million (if married).
    The latest tax reform more than doubled the exemption. It is now nearly 23 mil for a couple.
    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
    by Thomas Henry Huxley
    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
     
    #44
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    635
    Quote Originally Posted by Pego View Post
    The latest tax reform more than doubled the exemption. It is now nearly 23 mil for a couple.
    Ha. I missed that change, but it sunsets in 2025. Better die between bow abd then if you're worth well in excess lf 11 million!
    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
     
    #45
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Indian Territory
    Posts
    13,905
    Quote Originally Posted by Pego View Post
    The latest tax reform more than doubled the exemption. It is now nearly 23 mil for a couple.
    Whew!!!! ... wait, how much for a single?
    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
     
    #46
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,682
    Quote Originally Posted by tandfman View Post
    What if it's a retired person whose investments resulted from working 60-hour weeks for decades?
    Tax them just as much as the current workers who are making the retirees' investments grow by putting in 60-hour weeks.

    It's long overdue to stop having different tax rates based on the type of income.
    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
     
    #47
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    651
    Quote Originally Posted by 18.99s View Post
    Tax them just as much as the current workers who are making the retirees' investments grow by putting in 60-hour weeks.

    It's long overdue to stop having different tax rates based on the type of income.
    We already paid taxes on income. Our current investments grow during our retirements. We are leaving our assets to charities. Why do the losers claim even more? They didn't earn it.
    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
     
    #48
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,682
    Quote Originally Posted by Master403 View Post
    We already paid taxes on income. Our current investments grow during our retirements.
    Investment growth is also income, which should be taxed at the same rate as labor income.
    We are leaving our assets to charities. Why do the losers claim even more? They didn't earn it.
    People who work for their money earned it, and the income from their labor shouldn't be taxed at higher rates than income from the movements in stock prices.
    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
     
    #49
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,682
    Quote Originally Posted by Merner521 View Post
    I actually think cap gains needs more reforms than the estate tax. Its too easy to avoid, and at the same time it's taxing inflation when you can't avoid it, which seems pretty unfair.
    It's not unfair. Inflation implicitly taxes everybody.

    If you have money sitting in the bank at near-zero interest, it loses real value due to inflation. If you have an asset that goes up in price at the same rate as inflation, and it is taxed on the nominal gain, your brain perceives it as unfair because you are considering the impact of inflation on the real value of that asset, without also doing the same for the real value of cash in the bank.
    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
     
    #50
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    20,412
    Quote Originally Posted by 18.99s View Post
    People who work for their money earned it, and the income from their labor shouldn't be taxed at higher rates than income from the movements in stock prices.
    Movements in stock prices don't create taxable income. You get taxed only when you sell the stock.
    Reply With Quote
     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •