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Thread: Current movies

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    #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trickstat View Post
    Some southern accents have a broadly similar 'twang' to some of the accents found in the rural south-west and east of England.
    My understanding was that wouthwest, west and northwest bordering with Scotland makes sense.. East not as much.
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    #32
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    A great deal of UK culture remains in the more remote parts of Kentucky. The folk music, folk tales, and you can't swing a dead cat without hitting a ginger up in them hills.
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    #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinR View Post
    you can't swing a dead cat . . .
    which, according to Hollywood, is a daily occurrence among all the in-breds in the hollers.
    I was fascinated with the depiction of rural Ky in the series Justified, but even I knew it may have been a slight exaggeration.
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    #34
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    Meanwhile...

    Smack the Pony-English as a Foreign Langauge ....

    From 1999 until 2003, the UK’s Channel 4 screened an Emmy award-winning female-led comedy series called Smack the Pony. In one sketch a woman called Jackie O’Farrell (played by Doon Mackichan) marches into an adult education centre somewhere in England, sits down and tries to register for a course in speaking English as a foreign language.

    But you already speak English, the puzzled course organiser (played by Sally Phillips) says. “I only speak English English,” Jackie replies. “I don’t know how to speak it as a foreign language.” She travels a lot, she says. “Foreign people can’t understand a word I’m saying.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3iJ9gnt7wNo&app=desktop&persist_app=1

    https://www.ft.com/content/bc8f9c5c-...5-db2f231cfeae
    Last edited by Conor Dary; 12-04-2019 at 07:28 PM.
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    #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conor Dary View Post
    “I only speak English English,” Jackie replies. “I don’t know how to speak it as a foreign language.” She travels a lot, she says. “Foreign people can’t understand a word I’m saying.”
    I know quite a few Scots and Irish who need that class!
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    #36
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    I fluent in American English but have difficulty understanding English English.
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    #37
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    I spent some time in Ukraine in 1994, and one of my interpreters had recently worked with a Scotsman. She said he was almost impossible to understand.

    But then again, one of my friends was from western North Carolina, and used the phrase, "... I like to died when that happened!" in his impenetrable NC accent, and she was totally clueless as to what he just said. It was beyond hilarious.
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    #38
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    I lived in North Carolina for about 40 years and for the 25 years of my practice, I had the same medical assistant, a lovely woman I referred to as the Fabulous Kim. Kim was from rural North Carolina and had an accent, but not hard to understand for me. Her best friend was also from rural North Carolina, and when they talked to each other, the accents came on thick and heavy and I had trouble understanding them, although I did catch it when Rhonda (her friend), answered Kim by saying, "I would be done gone slam crazy."

    I saw Kim last week when she and her husband were vacationing on Hilton Head and we had dinner and we still laughed about that one.
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    #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobguild76 View Post
    But then again, one of my friends was from western North Carolina, and used the phrase, "... I like to died when that happened!" in his impenetrable NC accent, and she was totally clueless as to what he just said. It was beyond hilarious.
    My favorite local construction is

    "Ah wuz jest fixin' ta cut off the lahts."
    The first time I heard it, I had no idea what it meant.

    When I got my masters at the local university back in the late 70s, a lady classmate asked me,
    "Do you have a pin?"
    I looked at her and shook my head, "A pin?"
    "Yes, I need to borrow a pin."
    "Sorry, no."
    "I need something to write with."
    "Oh, you need a PEN?"
    "Yes, that what I said, a pin."
    I let it go and gave her my pen.
    Last edited by Atticus; 12-07-2019 at 01:06 AM.
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    #40
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    Meanwhile....

    The `Irishman' is a Netflix hit -- but only 18% made it to the end.....

    https://mobile.twitter.com/dandrezne...06455316742146
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