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    1917
    #1
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    Wow...a single take .... fascinating... Hitchcock tried it, with mixed results, in Rope.

    Sam Mendes’s 1917 is an amazingly audacious film; as exciting as a heist movie, disturbing as a sci-fi nightmare. Working with co-writer Krysty Wilson-Cairns, he has created a first world war drama of the Western Front and a terrible journey undertaken by two boys like a ghost train ride into a day-lit house of horror, periodically descending into night as if going underwater and then resurfacing into an alien world, bright with menace.

    And it’s all filmed in one extraordinary single take by cinematographer Roger Deakins, a continuous fluid travelling shot (with digital edits sneaked in, evidently at those moments where we lose sight of them, or in moments of darkness or explosion – but where exactly, I mostly couldn’t tell) .

    https://www.theguardian.com/film/201...ot-masterpiece


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    Quote Originally Posted by Conor Dary View Post
    Wow...a single take .... fascinating... Hitchcock tried it, with mixed results, in Rope.

    [snip]

    And it's all filmed in one extraordinary single take by cinematographer Roger Deakins, a continuous fluid travelling shot (with digital edits sneaked in, evidently at those moments where we lose sight of them, or in moments of darkness or explosion... .

    https://www.theguardian.com/film/201...ot-masterpiece

    Correct me if I'm wrong but a single take would require all the action to be continuously recorded from start to finish.

    This is what Hitchcock wanted to do but he was stymied by the maximum length of film that could be used. In the end he used about a dozen(?) takes which each started where the previous take ended by using a defocus/refocus on the same object to create the continuity.

    Given that the article clearly says that there were edits in 1917, it seems that it was actually a multiple take movie with those multiple takes stitched together with more technical sophistication than Hitchcock had available. This is known as a single shot movie as the article link title correctly states.
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Toro View Post
    This is known as a single shot movie as the article link title correctly states.
    There are two very famous 'long-takes' in contemporary hit movies - (I looked up the duration for each)
    1. Atonement - in a superb WW2 beach scene. (5:08)
    2. The Player - opening scene at a movie studio (8:08)

    The longest in Rope was 10:06

    These scenes are absolutely mesmerizing because there are no edits whatsoever, and the camera must make some very impressive traveling shots.
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    The Player beginning was a homage to the most famous one continuous shot opening sequence....Touch of Evil...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBAt...&persist_app=1
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conor Dary View Post
    The Player beginning was a homage to the most famous one continuous shot opening sequence....Touch of Evil...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBAt...&persist_app=1
    Interesting. At 3:20 of that 3:40 clip, the car explosion is a cut and edit, which is too bad, because it would have been more effective to just swing the camera to the explosion and back to the couple watching it.

    The logistics of a long take used to be very difficult with dollies, tracks, and cranes. Now it can all be done by one drone.
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    Had not heard of 1917 before this thread. Thanks.

    In the realm of single-shot sequences (in the CGI era), Children of Men had 3, ranging from slightly longer than 3 minutes to slightly longer than 6 minutes.
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    #7
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    There was a noted single continuous shot at the start of Snake Eyes starring Nicholas Cage. I assume it was a single take? It was the most memorable thing about the movie for me.
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvL0Bj9ZUPc
    5 minutes "Secret in their eyes". Argentinian film, far superior to American remake. Excuse Spanish.
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    #9
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    Last two times I've gone to the movies ("Motherless Brooklyn" & JoJo Rabbit") the coming attraction for "1917" has popped up.
    "Birdman" reportedly had some long continuous takes.
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    #10
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    the fabulous opening barracks scene in Full Metal Jacket has the feel of one long shoot.
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