Facts, Not Fiction

 
Page 7 of 9 FirstFirst ... 56789 LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 82
  1. Collapse Details
     
    #61
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    ???? ???? in Ronald MacDonald's Home Town, and once a Duck always a Duck.
    Posts
    11,623
    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    (he really did say Notnim.)
    I believe it....part of it might be Nottingham was first known as Snot's Ham....it could be a local dialect that never evolved much on place names..... if you look in the OED of English Place Names a lot of weird pronunciations correspond well with old spellings from centuries ago.

    By the way did you ever get to the Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem near Nottingham Castle...supposedly the oldest pub in England from 1189...great place..
    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
     
    #62
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Santa Barbara
    Posts
    954
    When I started 5th grade eons ago, a new kid named Leo announced that he was from a place back east that baffled the rest of us.
    He version of the city's name was "Woos-tah"
    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
     
    #63
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    on task
    Posts
    12,073
    Quote Originally Posted by Conor Dary View Post
    By the way did you ever get to the Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem near Nottingham Castle...supposedly the oldest pub in England from 1189...great place..
    No, but made me look it up:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ye_Olde_Trip_to_Jerusalem

    I did seek this out:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tabard

    not realizing it was long gone, except for this

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ta...Tabard_Inn.jpg
    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
     
    #64
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    from an IP that never sent jazz that PM, never !
    Posts
    7,023
    I always wondered where the average crusader would have gone to freshen the palate with a balmy stale pint of ale after returning from Byzantium !
    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
     
    #65
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    on task
    Posts
    12,073
    Quote Originally Posted by Conor Dary View Post
    Nottingham was first known as Snot's Ham...
    Thought you were kidding! Not so much.

    Quote Originally Posted by ancestry.com
    Old English as ‘homestead (ham) of Snot’s people’.
    Must have been running folks . . . [rimshot].
    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
     
    #66
    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    We drove there in 2007, just to see Sherwood Forest (almost all gone), stopped in a local gas (sorry . . . petrol) station, asked the attendant about it and

    He said, 'Go back towards Notnim.'
    I said, 'Nottingham?"
    He looked at me funny, nodded and said, 'Notnim.'
    That is my entire experience with the name in the UK. That may have been just his way of saying it, but that is indeed what he said.

    Not unlike going to Edinburgh and having all the natives calling it,

    Ed'n'bura

    Where'd the 'g' go?!
    My guess is that the "g" went to the same place that we get the "a" from in Louisville (Louavul).
    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
     
    #67
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    ???? ???? in Ronald MacDonald's Home Town, and once a Duck always a Duck.
    Posts
    11,623
    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    Thought you were kidding! Not so much..
    Ye of little faith...
    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
     
    #68
    Quote Originally Posted by tandfman View Post
    What I've heard there is neither of those two, but a combination of them: NAW-lins.
    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    my ear picks up nawlins (no emphasis)
    I've never heard a fellow resident of New Orleans pronounce it like either of those, nor have I heard New Or-leens.

    It's either New Oar-lenz (last syllable similar to lens, as in optics) or New Oa-lee-unz (first syllable like "oar" as in a type of tool used to propel a boat, the "r" is frequently dropped). The latter is more common among the upper class who have been in the city for generations.
    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
     
    #69
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    on task
    Posts
    12,073
    Quote Originally Posted by KevinR View Post
    My guess is that the "g" went to the same place that we get the "a" from in Louisville (Louavul).
    I visited Pittsbura in Pennsylvania once.
    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
     
    #70
    How would one pronounce Raymond Luxury Yacht?
    Reply With Quote
     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •