Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #91
    Quote Originally Posted by TN1965 View Post
    And where are those track athletes? June Eastwood of b-ball would not turn a struggling team to a D1 national champion.
    I disagree. A journeyman male college basketball player is light-years better than the best female college basketball and basketball is the one team sport where a single player can make a huge difference. The best female player in the nation couldn't make a D1 men's roster.
    Last edited by jazzcyclist; 10-30-2019 at 10:11 PM.
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    #92
    Quote Originally Posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    I disagree. A journeyman male college basketball player is light-years better than the best female college basketball and basketball is the one team sport where a single player can make a huge difference. The best female player in the nation couldn't make a D1 men's roster.
    A journeyman male college player after 1 yr of hormone therapy couldn't make a D1 roster, either.
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    #93
    Quote Originally Posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    Imagine if there was a college women's basketball coach so desperate to win that he/she signed a really good transgender player. Because of the nature of the sport, that team would be a shoe-in for the NCAA title.
    That greatly depends on what level of player makes the transition -- a 5'10" point guard who averages 2 points and 6 minutes per game for a school outside the top 100, or a starting 6'9"/245 lb forward who averages 17 points and 8 rebounds for a top 25 team?

    The latter would be single-handedly destroying every opposing women's team, but the 5'10" journeyman isn't going to turn an average women's team into a title contender.

    Fortunately, we won't see a good 6'9" guy transitioning while in college. The incentives of NBA money or European league money are too great. If a guy like that has thoughts of transitioning, he'll wait until after his days in professional men's leagues are over (or never got started because no team signed him after college) and then maybe try for the WNBA.
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    #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    The best female player in the nation couldn't make a D1 men's roster.
    Really?
    I know the ball and overall game are vastly different, but I gotta think that Heather Donlon of the 1990 Fordham team, who made 57% (50 of 87) of her 3-pt tries, would be welcome somewhere.
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    #95
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    Just ran across this video. Pre-apology if it has already been posted. This case continues to be infuriating...

    https://youtu.be/8ipCrGBMtAc
    You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!
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    #96
    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    Really?
    I know the ball and overall game are vastly different, but I gotta think that Heather Donlon of the 1990 Fordham team, who made 57% (50 of 87) of her 3-pt tries, would be welcome somewhere.
    57% shooting against women won't translate to even 30% against long-armed men well over 6 feet tall.
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    #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    Really?
    I know the ball and overall game are vastly different, but I gotta think that Heather Donlon of the 1990 Fordham team, who made 57% (50 of 87) of her 3-pt tries, would be welcome somewhere.
    She'd barely get a shot off against a motivated D-1 man. Remember (one of, if not) the greatest common denominator for BB players isn't height, it's wingspan-to-height ratio = defense! And the ball is bigger (which you noted...but that's a huge deal!). And how far was the 3pt line in 1990?
    Last edited by scottmitchell74; 10-30-2019 at 11:22 PM.
    You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!
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    #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by 18.99s View Post
    -- a 5'10" point guard who averages 2 points and 6 minutes per game for a school outside the top 100, or a starting 6'9"/245 lb forward who averages 17 points and 8 rebounds for a top 25 team?

    The latter would be single-handedly destroying every opposing women's team, but the 5'10" journeyman isn't going to turn an average women's team into a title contender.
    Totally disagree, the male 5-10 point guard on even a D-2 bball team is an explosive and quick athlete that would leave every female at a complete loss to defend and he would steal the ball often on defense.
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    #99
    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    Really?
    I know the ball and overall game are vastly different, but I gotta think that Heather Donlon of the 1990 Fordham team, who made 57% (50 of 87) of her 3-pt tries, would be welcome somewhere.
    She wouldn't be able to create her own shot and she would be a huge defensive liability. Also with the larger ball the shooting percentage of all female players decreases.
    Last edited by jazzcyclist; 10-31-2019 at 02:53 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by user4 View Post
    Totally disagree, the male 5-10 point guard on even a D-2 bball team is an explosive and quick athlete that would leave every female at a complete loss to defend and he would steal the ball often on defense.
    He's 5'10, there's only one of him, and some of his explosiveness would be gone after the hormone therapy. Top women's teams would figure out how to defend him with double-teaming and other strategies, knowing that his mediocre teammates don't have the chops to rain in a bunch of points against the other players when the defense is focused on him. He'd still average 30-ish points per game, but that won't be enough to beat the top women's teams when he's playing with teammates who weren't a top 150 team without him.

    But if you're talking about an entire starting 5 of players like that, then yes they'd win the NCAA D1 women's title for sure.
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