Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    High altitude tradeoffs
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    Iím on vacation in Peru right now. While in Puno (12,500í/3,830m) we drove by their football stadium. I asked the cab driver how well it worked when sea level teams came to play. He mentioned that sea level teams really hate to go there and frequently lost.it damn near killed me and I ended up getting oxygen at the hotel.

    When distance runners have high altitude camps, how high are they typically? Iíve read that for the 1968 Olympic Games, the US distance guys trained at Los Alamos NM at 7,000. Would it be a waste to go much higher than 7,000? I canít imagine 12,500being productive.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave View Post
    Would it be a waste to go much higher than 7,000? I canít imagine 12,500being productive.
    A quick Google search finds several commercial running camps in the 7500-8000' range, but then there's this bad-boy at 9000!

    https://trailrunner.com/trail-news/h...chool-runners/

    and for real nosebleed training, this at 11000':

    https://www.altitudecamp.com/about/

    I'm guessing that some Kenyans and Ethiopians train even higher.
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    Estadio Hernando Siles, in the Bolivian capital of La Paz, is so high above sea-level that it impacts not only the fans but the footballers too. Named after a Bolivian politician, itís one of the highest football stadiums in the world, at an altitude of 3,600m metres above sea level.

    Local teams are used to playing at that altitude, but it can affect visitors more adversely. For instance, in 2009, Diego Maradonaís Argentina were thrashed 6-1 by Bolivia and looked breathless.

    In 2013, Argentina played there again. During a 1-1 draw, Messi was reportedly sick on the pitch and Angel di Maria had to be given oxygen.

    In 2007, Fifa banned matches being played at more than 2,500m above sea level. Boliviaís President, Evo Morales, argued the ban amounted to discrimination, saying, ďThis is not only a ban on Bolivia, itís a ban on the universality of sports.Ē

    Fifa later decided to suspend the ban after protests.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcthree/artic...5-48e336f48b23
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    I know a number of HS and college teams that do week-long stints in summer in Summit County or Chaffee County, CO, probably sleeping 8000' to 9500', training some at that elevation (intervals, hills etc) and some longer runs in higher valleys. Some of the Bowerman TC runners have spent time in Woodland Park, CO, where I live, at 8500'. They typically go down to Colorado Springs (6200 to 7000') to do intervals and tempo runs. Longer runs might be either location. The Army guys like Paul Chelimo (now out of the Army), Shadrack Kipchirchir, etc stay in the Springs and come up to do their long runs on Rampart Range Rd, long dirt road at 9200' that runs from the WP area 42 miles north toward Denver (actually starts in the Garden of the Gods in the Springs and runs 22 miles up to WP).
    Last edited by DrJay; Yesterday at 10:45 PM.
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    #5
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    One of the miler-types that stayed in WP would drive down to CSU-Pueblo to do intervals, at 4900'. Sleep high, train low.
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    I remember hearing a few years ago that there was a soccer team that played in a high-altitude venue in, I think, Ecuador. Apparently, they always finished in the middle of the league because they tended to win all their home games and lose all their away games played against teams from cities at or near the coast.
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    #7
    Ok, so where is the point of diminishing returns for a distance runner?
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    #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave View Post
    Ok, so where is the point of diminishing returns for a distance runner?
    If you can run for an hour.
    We went to the top of Pikes Peak (14000') and I could walk around, but I did get light-headed. By the time we got to Leadville (10000') we had acclimated, and I didn't notice the difference (not that I was running!).
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    #9
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    40 years ago, when I could actually run, with no acclimation just jogging in mile high Denver was painful... on Pikes Peak, could barely make it walking back to car from lookout point.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conor Dary View Post
    Estadio Hernando Siles, in the Bolivian capital of La Paz, is so high above sea-level that it impacts not only the fans but the footballers too. Named after a Bolivian politician, itís one of the highest football stadiums in the world, at an altitude of 3,600m metres above sea level.

    Local teams are used to playing at that altitude, but it can affect visitors more adversely. For instance, in 2009, Diego Maradonaís Argentina were thrashed 6-1 by Bolivia and looked breathless.

    In 2013, Argentina played there again. During a 1-1 draw, Messi was reportedly sick on the pitch and Angel di Maria had to be given oxygen.

    In 2007, Fifa banned matches being played at more than 2,500m above sea level. Boliviaís President, Evo Morales, argued the ban amounted to discrimination, saying, ďThis is not only a ban on Bolivia, itís a ban on the universality of sports.Ē

    Fifa later decided to suspend the ban after protests.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcthree/artic...5-48e336f48b23
    The Original Ronaldo scoring against the host in the 1997 Copa Americana final while being visibly sick is one of the most amazing displays of talent and grit that I can remember in this game. That La Paz stadium is quite something.
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