Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    I wonder why Rodgers didn’t say he felt a twinge? He clearly abruptly slowed his gait a few steps before the exchange. I hope he isn’t hiding an injury (however minor) just to run the final.

    And Canada... Really?!
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    Given the sympathy bronze medals I was praying that IAAF would by sympathetic to the fact the semis were so imbalanced and put Canada in lane 1. Crazy suggestion but just seems unfair to go out after running 37.91.

    I admit the imbalance was in hindsight since I looked at the first semi and thought how on earth did they put UK, USA and Jamaica in the same semi. Many of those teams in the second semi really and truly out did themselves. Would be great if it was not a one off cause then it would mean all 8 teams going under 38 in the finals but I suspect that even without any bad changes a few of those teams would run quite a bit slower than their semi final time while Canada would have run faster.
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    ORDER / LANE BIB ATHLETE COUNTRY PB SB 2019
    2 FRA FRANCE FRA FRA 37.79 37.88
    3 NED NETHERLANDS NED NED 37.91 37.91
    4 JPN JAPAN JPN JPN 37.60 37.78
    5 RSA SOUTH AFRICA RSA RSA 37.65 37.65
    6 BRA BRAZIL BRA BRA 37.90 37.90
    7 GBR GREAT BRITAIN & NI GBR GBR 37.47 37.56
    8 USA UNITED STATES USA USA 37.38 38.03
    9 CHN PR OF CHINA CHN CHN. 37.79 37.79

    Has to be the first time the US has the slowest time of the 8 teams in the final.
    Lane 8: A good Lane for a team Front-loaded with the 100 gold and silver runners.
    Great Britain, in Lane 7, and defending champ. Have no idea if they have any subs with faster potential for the final. They look confident, but let's not forget their own baton history of futility.
    Japan, again, no idea of subs, but they had a very bad last exchange because the anchor did not leave on time....don't expect that to happen again

    It should come down to GBR, Japan and the US. I think US fans are overestimating how much ground Lyles could make up in 90 meters, 89, if Rodgers gives him the baton in the same place as today. South Africa and China should contend for fourth.

    My prediction is Great Britain, Japan, USA.
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    USA also lost time on the Gatlin wobble right after he took the baton from Coleman. His speed was not what it should have been and the Sports Gold announcer mentioned that he lost ground on his leg, to GB in particular.

    The result was that USA gave away the advantage from Coleman's start and Rodgers got the baton probably no better than even, accounting for the stagger.

    In the final, Gatlin needs to at least maintain the Coleman advantage and give the third leg the baton with an edge.
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    Now what happened today for the US men:
    First exchange was okay; 2nd exchange Gatlin runs up on Rodgers;
    3rd exchange, another typical US cluster----.
    Gillipsie leaves when Rodgers hits the tape (the cameras switch to the straight away angle)
    but it does appear that the distance to the go mark was quite generous which means that Rodgers was expected to finish strong, which he obviously did not.
    Question, why have a long mark in a prelim when you know all you have to do is qualify and you know you have someone else to anchor in the final? It makes absolutely no sense to have the mark so long.
    So what happens, Gillipsie leaves on time Rodgers starts yelling and runs 4or 5 strides with his right arm extended which causes him to slow down even more.
    Gillipsie put his arm back and runs 4or 5 strides with it extended making his target-hand harder to hit.
    Result: another terrible exchange in a situation that called for nothing but a safe, easy, smooth exchange. And that is the fault of the relay coaches.
    The US technique is flawed and it is only a matter of time before disaster strikes again.
    For those New here, The US men take 6 steps and put their arms back and wait for the stick. They don't call stick and then put the hand back in one stride and get the baton quickly. Instead they run with arms extended and not accelerating as well as they should.
    At some point the US men will do something in the 4x1 relay that has never been done before: the outgoing runner will knock the baton out of the incoming runner's hand.

    That's what could happen when the outgoing runner initiates the blind exchange instead of the incoming runner who can see.

    Madness, Pure madness!
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJG View Post
    And how many teams did you see use that technique?
    Did not count em but Japan does upsweep well.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lonewolf View Post
    Did not count em but Japan does upsweep well.

    Yes, they do, but they have those small hands to overlap on the stick and they have two hands on the baton for a relatively long time near the end of the zone.
    They also have more opportunity to step of the heels of the outgoing runner.
    Check their third exchange today.

    PS. LoneWolf, I know you have been around a long time.
    But I have been a relay guy for 55 years and they is nothing that would convince me that close-quarter upswing is better than fully-extended downswing flick of the wrist.
    Last edited by DJG; 10-05-2019 at 04:46 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJG View Post
    they have those small hands to overlap on the stick
    Uhhhhhh..... what?
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJG View Post
    .
    Great Britain, in Lane 7, and defending champ. Have no idea if they have any subs with faster potential for the final.
    In short, no.
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    Man, De Grasse got out so poorly during the last exchange that is likely cost the Canadian men a spot in the final. He was almost even with Martina as they set off, but was like 3m down by the time he got the baton. Brutal.
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