Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam$ View Post
    Very little. I think without using any of Philips's voice they told the story of Elvis coming in to record "Blue Moon/Ky" . Burns didn't use Elvis that much. Obviously he was country but more R&R.
    The 95 series R&R on PBS (Burns not involved) featured Sun. They don't repeat it and it's hard to get. Scroll up to about 5.30 for Sun.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ar4pghIpFPg
    Episode 4 is where Burns covers Sun Records. He integrates Elvis and Cash together and basically says that he came off the road with Elvis one day and walked into his Sun Records office where Johnny Cash was waiting to audition.
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotDutra5 View Post
    Episode 4 is where Burns covers Sun Records. He integrates Elvis and Cash together and basically says that he came off the road with Elvis one day and walked into his Sun Records office where Johnny Cash was waiting to audition.
    This was my favorite scene from the movie "Walk The Line".
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    This was my favorite scene from the movie "Walk The Line".
    I probably should watch the movie sometime. Another Cash factoid from the documentary was his friendships with both Elvis and Dylan. I was unaware of both.
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotDutra5 View Post
    I probably should watch the movie sometime. Another Cash factoid from the documentary was his friendships with both Elvis and Dylan. I was unaware of both.
    As Dylan shifted personas, after folk and rock he temporarily landed on country with Nashville Skyline. "Girl from the North Country" has a label credit as a duet with Johnny Cash, a rare if not unique occurence for a Dylan studio album.

    The Wikipedia article
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nashville_Skyline
    has two interesting quotes

    Clinton Heylin
    If Dylan was concerned about retaining a hold on the rock constituency, making albums with Johnny Cash in Nashville was tantamount to abdication in many eyes.
    Kris Kristoffersen
    Our generation owes him our artistic lives, because he opened all the doors in Nashville when he did Blonde on Blonde and Nashville Skyline. The country scene was so conservative until he arrived. He brought in a whole new audience. He changed the way people thought about it even the Grand Ole Opry was never the same again.
    The album was promoted on The Johnny Cash Show.
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotDutra5 View Post
    Another Cash factoid from the documentary was his friendships with both Elvis and Dylan. I was unaware of both.
    Given their similar ages and geography, I would have been surprised if he hadn't crossed paths with Elvis, but Dylan was a different matter. However, his most unlikely pairing was with Louis Armstrong. I was really surprised when I saw them playing together.
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotDutra5 View Post
    I probably should watch the movie sometime. Another Cash factoid from the documentary was his friendships with both Elvis and Dylan. I was unaware of both.
    This is a review of the performers who were at the 30th anniversary concert celebration for Bob Dylan in 1992.

    http://www.bobdylan.com/albums/the-3...t-celebration/

    Country and rockabilly legend Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan have a long history of mutual admiration for one another. They first met at the Newport Folk Festival in 1964, and went on to record a session together in Nashville in 1969. The normally TV-shy Dylan even appeared on a Cash television special taped at the Grand Ole Opry in 1969. Cash and Dylan's duet on "Girl Of The North Country" was featured on Dylan's groundbreaking country-rock effort "Nashville Skyline", for which Cash wrote the Grammy Award-winning liner notes. At the show, Cash and June Carter Cash, his wife and longtime musical partner, teamed up for a surprisingly celebratory, down-home version of "It Ain't Me, Babe," a song from "Another Side Of Bob Dylan" that Cash took up the charts in 1964, well before the Turtles turned it into a pop smash in 1965.
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    Watched the final episode tonight and it reminded me of all the great artists and songs from the 1984-96 period. Some real tearjerkers included, with the great voices of Vince Gill and Keith Whitley and the amazing showmanship of Garth Brooks. Quality production all around, and I loved the focus on Johnny Cash's end, too.
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