Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    as our ascent from the Middle Ages continues
    #1
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    malaria to be eradicated by mid-century? (that would trump pretty much all the bad measles news)


    https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-he...-idUKKCN1VU148
    Last edited by gh; 09-11-2019 at 06:18 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    malara to be eradicated by mid-century? (that would trump pretty much all the bad measles news)


    https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-he...-idUKKCN1VU148
    I hope you are right, malaria has been one of he big killers for thousands (?) of years. If it applies to all mosquito borne diseases that would be a big help. Random and excessive use of DDT, has led to (1) almost all mosquitos resistant to DDT and other similar insecticides (2) decimated the best natural defenses, including birds such as he black drongo (in India), which ate up huge amounts of mosquitoes.
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    Quote Originally Posted by catson52 View Post
    I hope you are right, malaria has been one of he big killers for thousands (?) of years.
    Malarial diseases have been reported for at least 4000 years but the disease has existed for much longer, so it's likely that humans (and proto humans) have always been infected.

    George Poinar Jr of Oregon State University identified malarial parasites in a mosquito preserved in amber 15-20 million years old.

    "I think the fossil evidence shows that modern malaria vectored by mosquitoes is at least 20 million years old, and earlier forms of the disease, carried by biting midges, are at least 100 million years old and probably much older."

    https://today.oregonstate.edu/archiv...-age-dinosaurs

    He's also recently found a ~100 million year old mosquito that has most of the attributes of Anopheles a key malarial vector, leading to the speculation that mosquitos were transmitting malaria that far back.
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Toro View Post
    He's also recently found a ~100 million year old mosquito that has most of the attributes of Anopheles a key malarial vector
    Those buggers never die!!
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    how awesome would it be to knock off the common cold?

    http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-new...mmon-cold.html
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    I went in to have my flu shot two weeks ago. The nurse told me that the vaccine is now composed from "more strains of the flu virus" than in previous years. I have not researched exactly what that meant but it made me feel invincible when I left !!
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by user4 View Post
    I went in to have my flu shot two weeks ago. The nurse told me that the vaccine is now composed from "more strains of the flu virus" than in previous years. I have not researched exactly what that meant but it made me feel invincible when I left !!
    Wow! I usually walk into the doctor's office with a strain. You went there to a get a bunch of them!!
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    A few years ago, Brazil released some genetically modified mosquitoes designed to produce offspring that would die fast (before reproductive maturity) ... but it didn't work.

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019...ompts-backlash

    They should have known that approach is not sustainable. If the gene works as intended, the offspring can't pass it on, so after the initial wave of early deaths, the next generation would be be made up of mosquitoes without the gene.

    The lab's next breed of mosquitoes is designed to make only the female offspring die young, so the males can pass on the modified genes to the next generation. But those haven't yet been released into the wild.
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    Color me skeptical about getting rid of the mosquitos (well, al least in a foreseeable future). Methink, if we want to eradicate malaria, let's concentrate on Plasmodium. I would say, immunization of population at risk would go a long way. No vaccine so far has been very good, that should be a high priority.
    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
    by Thomas Henry Huxley
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinR View Post
    Wow! I usually walk into the doctor's office with a strain. You went there to a get a bunch of them!!
    I was like a pin cushion!
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