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Thread: '19 Paris DL

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    #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by gm View Post
    According to whom?
    Physiology.
    Cheers,
    Alan Shank
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    #62
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    Ronald Musagala is looking really, really good. He ran 13.0 last 100, and has won his last two (one of them non-DL), both with quick finishes. Ten under 3:32!

    re W 800 -- If you look at the Race Analysis file, the top three were 6-7-8 at 400.

    Conseslus Kipruto couldn't keep up on the last lap, but 8:13 is pretty good for his first steeple of the year, after having that bad foot. He's probably the only guy who can out-kick El Bakkali.
    Cheers,
    Alan Shank
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    #63
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Shank View Post
    Physiology.
    Cheers,
    Alan Shank
    Kindly provide proof of this assertion.
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    #64
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    from the November '10 T&FN:

    Since Tom Hampson of Britain ran history’s first sub-1:50 in the 800 at the ’32 Olympics, only twice in the progression of the fastest time ever—not necessarily the official World Record—has the mark been made with a second lap faster than the first. Those were by Jim Ryun and Dave Wottle.

    On average, these 22 races were run with a second lap that was 1.7 seconds slower than the first.

    Going backwards, here’s the best-time progression, with lap splits and differential (+ = converted from 880-yard time):

    1:41.01 David Rudisha 48.9/52.1 +3.2
    1:41.09 —Rudisha 49.1/52.0 +2.9
    1:41.11 Wilson Kipketer 49.3/51.8 +2.5
    1:41.24 —Kipketer 48.3/52.9 +4.6
    1:41.73 —Kipketer 49.6/52.1 +2.5
    1:41.73 Seb Coe 49.7/52.0 +2.3
    1:42.33 —Coe 50.6/51.7 +1.1
    1:43.44 Alberto Juantorena 51.4/52.0 +0.6
    1:43.50 —Juantorena 50.9/52.6 +1.7
    1:43.5+ Rick Wohlhuter 50.7/52.8 +2.1
    1:43.7 Marcello Fiasconaro 51.2/52.5 +1.3
    1:44.0+ —Wohlhuter 51.7/52.3 +0.6
    1:44.3 Dave Wottle 52.9/51.4 -1.5
    1:44.40 Ralph Doubell 51.2/53.2 +2.0
    1:44.3+ Jim Ryun 53.0/51.3 -1.7
    1:44.3 Peter Snell 50.6/53.7 +2.9
    1:45.7 Roger Moens 52.6/53.3 +0.7
    1:46.6 Rudolf Harbig 52.8/53.8 +1.0
    1:48.4 Sydney Wooderson 52.3/56.1 +3.8
    1:49.0+ Elroy Robinson 53.2/55.8 +2.6
    1:49.1 Ben Eastman 53.7/55.4 +1.7
    1:49.8 Tom Hampson 54.8/54.9 +0.1
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    #65
    Quote Originally Posted by trackCanuck View Post
    I wish we would, but to me it was obvious long before this year. And I am a bit skeptical of the Jamaican times in their nationals. When I see a couple of 10.72s at worlds I'll believe it, but we won't.
    I think SAFP is running under 10.8 each race apart from when she jogs so the results at the trials may not look that suspicious.
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    #66
    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    from the November '10 T&FN:

    Since Tom Hampson of Britain ran history’s first sub-1:50 in the 800 at the ’32 Olympics, only twice in the progression of the fastest time ever—not necessarily the official World Record—has the mark been made with a second lap faster than the first. Those were by Jim Ryun and Dave Wottle.

    On average,these 22 races were run with a second lap that was 1.7 seconds slower than the first.
    I would imagine that the 400 progression has a similar split differential.
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    #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    I would imagine that the 400 progression has a similar split differential.
    On average, maybe, but I'm not sure there has ever been a world class negative split 400. Anyone know of one ? This thread says John Smith came close ... https://www.letsrun.com/forum/flat_r...thread=7676025
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    #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by berkeley View Post
    On average, maybe, but I'm not sure there has ever been a world class negative split 400. Anyone know of one ? This thread says John Smith came close ...
    Seyni seems to be doing something close to that.
    I'm trying to remember remarkable home stretch finishes.
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    #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by berkeley View Post
    On average, maybe, but I'm not sure there has ever been a world class negative split 400. Anyone know of one ? This thread says John Smith came close ... https://www.letsrun.com/forum/flat_r...thread=7676025
    What were Blake Leeper's splits in his 44.38 in the USATF semi-final this year? I would guess they were negative splits.
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    #70
    Any idea why Crouser was not in this meet?
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