Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    Quote Originally Posted by odelltrclan View Post
    How many guilty athletes raise their hands and say "you got me"?
    One -- Ben Johnson (Dubin Inquiry) -- who was advised that being up front and admitting to what he did would work for the betterment of the sport. Unfortunately, it taught everyone else that when you fess up, your penalty is certain. Better to deny, deny, deny.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JRM View Post
    One -- Ben Johnson (Dubin Inquiry) -- who was advised that being up front and admitting to what he did would work for the betterment of the sport. Unfortunately, it taught everyone else that when you fess up, your penalty is certain. Better to deny, deny, deny.
    He didn't admit when he was caught, he only admitted doping long after the fact.
    https://www.cbc.ca/archives/entry/be...any-wrongdoing
    Last edited by jazzcyclist; 08-25-2019 at 05:04 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tuariki View Post
    I disagree because the OOC testers who turned up at his house, or wherever, were definitely going to test him, whereas there was no certainty he would be tested at nationals.
    If that happens during nationals and the tester who showed up at his house wants him to get tested, all they have to do is call their WADA/USADA colleague at nationals to order the test. Which may have been what happened with Cantwell, given that he actually was tested at nationals on that occasion.

    Being at a major meet that's swarming with testers is not a test evasion strategy. The penalty should be a fine for wasting the tester's time, not counted as a missed test unless the athlete couldn't be found for testing at or near the stadium.
    Last edited by 18.99s; 08-25-2019 at 03:07 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    I remember a baseball player doing this a few years ago. The media was taken aback by his candor.
    Ok, maybe one of the very very very few. However, some of these Major League players, unlike track athletes, are much better off financially so can "afford" to be more honest. Secondly, the bans some of these professional athletes receive in baseball are slaps on the wrist relative to a track athlete. A 2 year ban can mean the death knell to a track athlete.

    In 2005 the penalties were laughable for MLB see this article. At that time they were publicly saying they had some of the stiffest penalties in sports for steroid use.

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/new-ste...-for-baseball/

    Now, I think they have a 50 game ban for an offense. Much better, but still paltry compared to T&F.
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    Coleman's statement acknowledges the scheduled hearing. There wouldn't be a hearing if there weren't charges, so he can't plausibly be taken to deny their existence.

    His statement says "what has been reported" is not true. The widely cited apnews article did not use the modifier "alleged". It said CC had missed the tests and that his actions/omissions were a violation of the rules.

    The Daily Mail also did not put "alleged" in its headline, although it did in the body of the article.

    Skepticism is warranted. Coleman is, however, entitled to deny that he has violated the pertinent rules, which the referenced reporting states as fact.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 18.99s View Post
    If that happens during nationals and the tester who showed up at his house wants him to get tested, all they have to do is call their WADA/USADA colleague at nationals to order the test. Which may have been what happened with Cantwell, given that he actually was tested at nationals on that occasion.

    Being at a major meet that's swarming with testers is not a test evasion strategy. The penalty should be a fine for wasting the tester's time, not counted as a missed test unless the athlete couldn't be found for testing at or near the stadium.
    As i understand it, if the testers were from the Athletics Integrity Unit they would not be in contact with USADA and possibly not even aware the US championships were on.

    Guess we will know more early September
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tuariki View Post
    I disagree because the OOC testers who turned up at his house, or wherever, were definitely going to test him, whereas there was no certainty he would be tested at nationals.
    Winning the USATF track Championships generally guarantees you are getting tested. And he came in expecting to win.

    I heard the sprinters gave blood and pee at USAs, not sure how often blood is drawn, apparently not every time.
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    Quote Originally Posted by polevaultpower View Post
    Winning the USATF track Championships generally guarantees you are getting tested. And he came in expecting to win.
    I don't disagree with you on this PVP, and if the testers were USADA, then that should, I would have thought, been OK.

    But if the testers were AIU, then that would seem to be a different scenario altogether.
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    Even if cleared, this process has to wreak havoc with his Doha preparations. It's hard to do the necessary things to be the best in the world while Damocles' sword is dangling above your head.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 18.99s View Post
    Being at a major meet that's swarming with testers is not a test evasion strategy.
    That's exactly my point. Entry in a national championship event gives the testers access to the entrant which is why I believe it should count as a whereabout notification. Not only does USADA/WADA share information with national governing bodies, but in the case of USATF, entry status for national championship events is publicly available on its website.
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