Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by tandfman View Post
    How many of those 11 tests were out-of-competition?
    Tests at USAs (indoors and outdoors) show up on the list. If they test you more than once at the meet, it might get counted twice. I'm not sure which other domestic meets have drug testing and whether or not they would appear on the USADA website.

    Most of those 11 are probably OOC, and he has had additional WADA-ordered tests not shown on the USADA site, and in-competition tests not reflected there.
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    #92
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    tangential posts about other positive-test sprinters now has its own thread in the Historical forum.
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    #93
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    Coleman has released a statement (now linked on home page) saying he expects to be cleared.
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    #94
    Quote Originally Posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    IMO, entry in any USATF Championship event should count as a where-about notification.
    Or such scenarios should be handled with a different penalty without counting it as a missed test, such as fining the athlete for wasting the testers' time.

    The goal of OOC testing should be to catch the dirty athletes who have an incentive to deliberately miss tests, not to ban the clean athletes who make administrative mistakes. Most of the time it's impossible to tell the difference between honest mistakes and deliberate test evasion, so both usually have to be penalized the same way. But when somebody competes at a national or major international competition where lots of testing is going on, that is a situation where it's certainly not an attempt to evade the testers.
    Last edited by 18.99s; 08-24-2019 at 10:24 PM.
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    #95
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    It just seems like common sense, not to penalize an athlete for not telling you he’s competing at the National Championships. ����*♂️
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    #96
    Quote Originally Posted by rhymans View Post
    Curious that 11 passed tests should get so little fanfare when compared with 3 missed tests
    Not really. I saw some program on TV not too long ago. Not sure who was the doping expert discussing doping. Maybe Victor Conte? The gist of it is that it is really easy still to get away with doping. You can dope (micro-dose) in a build-up phase by using the missed tests exception. You have a window of about 6 to 10 hours of "glowing", i.e. when you take and your body will reveal the test. If you take at night, there is only a small window in the morning into the next day when you will test positive. If you are "glowing" when the testers come, you miss the test.

    With this approach, the expert said it is pretty easy for certain parts of the year. You can then go into other parts of the year where you don't need to be juicing. This is when a lot of the tests for competition are done.

    Remember, Lance Armstrong passed hundreds of tests and was doping up to his gills so to speak.

    A passed test means you passed a test when you weren't "glowing". That is all it means. Missing tests can mean more than passing tests because the only reason someone would knowingly miss a third test is that they know they are likely to test positive anyway. Then you can play the excuse game to try and get out of it.

    I hope this is not the case with Coleman. How many guilty athletes raise their hands and say "you got me"? Not with reputations and paychecks on the line.
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    #97
    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    Coleman has released a statement (now linked on home page) saying he expects to be cleared.
    USADA gave a statement to Reuters confirming the charges, seemingly to refute Coleman's statement that the rumors were "simply not true."

    Linked on home page.
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    #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by _Jay View Post
    It just seems like common sense, not to penalize an athlete for not telling you hes competing at the National Championships. ����*♂️
    I disagree because the OOC testers who turned up at his house, or wherever, were definitely going to test him, whereas there was no certainty he would be tested at nationals.
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    #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by wamego relays champ View Post
    USADA gave a statement to Reuters confirming the charges, seemingly to refute Coleman's statement that the rumors were "simply not true."

    Linked on home page.
    Coleman's public statement obviously was a willful lie, so not a good look.
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    Quote Originally Posted by odelltrclan View Post
    How many guilty athletes raise their hands and say "you got me"? Not with reputations and paychecks on the line.
    I remember a baseball player doing this a few years ago. The media was taken aback by his candor.
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