Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    (and try not to think like an old fart!)
    Well, that didn't happen!
    I see why that school has problems; the administration is incompetent.
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    #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    Perhaps, but my grandson is a junior at a huge public school and they are having no problems either.
    Well, that convinces me. The weight of the evidence now says it's no problem. Case closed.
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    #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    Well, that didn't happen!
    I see why that school has problems; the administration is incompetent.
    The blame for the cellphone problem is first and foremost on the parents, who gave the kids phones (or the money to buy them) and didn't teach them to be disciplined with the phones when in class. The administration is doing a very good thing with this policy which is proving to be very effective.
    If THAT school is having problems, they should simply look at at all the schools who are not, and adopt their policies.
    Or more accurately, adopt their parents. They can't learn how to solve a problem from other schools which never had the problem in the first place due to having better parents.
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    #24
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    The best idea is what Atticus seems to be advocating... a campus & classroom culture where kids recognize when and where it is appropriate to use phones and when and where it is not. The first & most useful advice I got as a student-teacher was, "First you have to civilize them." In fact, while phones and computers can be easily abused they can also be used constructively in specific classroom applications.
    And in an extreme emergency situation the phones really might save lives.
    Just like other school behavioral issues (non-participation, talking, tardiness, whatever) the ideal is never perfectly achieved and requires constant attention from teachers and administrators.
    Teaching civil behavior is a never-ending battle, but one worth fighting. I once went ballistic in class because two students (bright, good kids) just couldn't stop talking.
    A parent told me the easy solution was to move them far apart... I insisted that the better solution was for the students stay put and to behave appropriately.
    I don't believe locking up phones does anything to advance personal accountability for students.
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    #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by 18.99s View Post
    The blame for the cellphone problem is first and foremost on the parents, who gave the kids phones (or the money to buy them) and didn't teach them to be disciplined with the phones when in class. The administration is doing a very good thing with this policy which is proving to be very effective.

    Or more accurately, adopt their parents. They can't learn how to solve a problem from other schools which never had the problem in the first place due to having better parents.
    This.
    You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!
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    #26
    Meanwhile, on the other side of the pond, Wiki sez:

    >>In the UK, a survey showed that there were no mobile phone bans in schools in 2001 but by 2007, 50% of schools had banned mobile phones during the school day. This number increased to 98% by 2012. These bans were implemented by either forbidding students from bringing phones onto school premises or by making students hand their phones in at the beginning of the day.[11] According to a study by the London School of Economics, students' academic performance improved when policies were implemented to ban cell phone usage in schools. This ban not only helped students score higher on exams but also reduced the students' temptations to use cell phones for non-scholarly purposes<<

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile...chools#Britain
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    #27
    The purpose of a classroom is for learning to take place. Do we bring board games, pets, or PlayStation 5 to class? The teacher is paid to teach , and students who aren't paying attention are wasting other people's time and money, not to mention their own time. Time spent on a phone doing something that has nothing to do with learning is like someone going to work and doing anything other than what the job requires.

    Parents who complain should think about that last point.
    Last edited by trackCanuck; 08-23-2019 at 02:01 AM.
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    #28
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    When you have a nut for a teacher....phones in the classroom is the least of your problems....

    https://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/news...ories-11347813
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    #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Conor Dary View Post
    When you have a nut for a teacher....phones in the classroom is the least of your problems....

    https://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/news...ories-11347813
    And his hero is.....
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    #30
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    "students who aren't paying attention are wasting other people's time and money, not to mention their own time"
    Blaming the behavior described here on cell phones? I seem to vaguely recall kids goofing off in class since I began elementary school in 1951. Guess we were ahead of the curve...
    Also recall looney teachers way back in the day :-)
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