Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #21
    Quote Originally Posted by bambam1729 View Post
    You can't start on that bike with the gearing it has, from a standing start.
    So use gear ratios that a human can manage under their own power and see what speeds can be reached.

    Wikipedia says the cycling speed record without a motorized lead vehicle is 89.58 mph.

    Maybe somebody could reach 100 mph under their own power if drafting behind a car without being towed by it, but I haven't found what the record is for that arrangement.
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    #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 18.99s View Post
    Wikipedia says the cycling speed record without a motorized lead vehicle is 89.58 mph.

    True, but that was a recumbent human-powered vehicle.

    The world record for an upright bike without any type of fairing is 47.9 MPH for a flying 200m.
    There are no strings on me
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    #23
    Quote Originally Posted by guru View Post
    True, but that was a recumbent human-powered vehicle.

    The world record for an upright bike without any type of fairing is 47.9 MPH for a flying 200m.
    And even that was at altitude with the assistance of a banked track. On a flat road, at sea level, in a still wind, with no draft assistance, anything over 40 mph would be a challenge for the best sprinters in the world.
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    #24
    I look at records like these the same way I look at bench press records set with weightlifting vests on. It's more of a daredevil stunt than a measure of athletic prowess.
    Last edited by jazzcyclist; 08-20-2019 at 07:53 PM.
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    #25
    Quote Originally Posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    I look at records like these the same way I look at bench press set with weightlifting vests on. It's more of daredevil stunt than a measure of athletic prowess.
    Disagree, Jazzy. I think it takes incredible bike handling skills and amazing leg power. I know when I'm descending some of the mountains here in New Hampshire, and probably going 45-50 mph, its pretty scary and I'm concentrating like hell on controlling the bike. Can't imagine controlling one at 180 mph
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    #26
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    That is what jazz is saying....going 180 on a bike is more of a daredevil thing....like fast downhill cycling...some people have great bike handling skills but can't ride fast as others....Peter Sagan has the best cycling skills but how many Tours has he won...

    Hard to say how great a cyclist this gal is from that video....an hour time trial would be far more indicative....
    Last edited by Conor Dary; 08-20-2019 at 04:53 PM.
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    #27
    Quote Originally Posted by bambam1729 View Post
    Disagree, Jazzy. I think it takes incredible bike handling skills and amazing leg power. I know when I'm descending some of the mountains here in New Hampshire, and probably going 45-50 mph, its pretty scary and I'm concentrating like hell on controlling the bike. Can't imagine controlling one at 180 mph
    Of course you have to be a strong cyclist to set a record like this but you don't have to be the strongest cyclist. Similarly, the fastest descender in the Tour de France is undoubtedly a strong cyclist, because he wouldn't be able to make the time limits if he wasn't, but he's not necessarily the strongest cyclist in the peleton.
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    #28
    I love the line about Gastone Nencini, considered perhaps the greatest descender ever - won the 1960 Tour and 1957 Giro. It was said of him: "The only reason to follow Nencini downhill would be if you had a death wish", said the French rider Raphaël Géminiani.
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    #29
    On the flip side, the same could be said of Jan Ullrich, who was a notoriously bad descender.
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    #30
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    As a former (not so powerful) powerlifter, and a lover of individual sports in general, I agree 100% with Jazzy; I want to know what you did with your ability in your sport with no gimmicks. These weird records (184mph, 1000+ pound bench press!?!) mean nothing to the man-on-the-street especially if you can't replicate it (or a proximity) in the gym/street setting.
    You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!
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