Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    wet tracks [split]
    #1
    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    Pretty sure that it's been established that today's spikes have BETTER traction in the wet.
    Can you 'splain why this so? It seems counter-intuitive.
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    #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Bowie View Post
    I was there. It sucked. Very difficult for any hurdler to have confidence in their footing on a wet track.
    I yield to your horse racing knowledge, but in this case, no. The atmospheric conditions were nigh on perfect for optimal performance in that race. Ralph Mann, the last person to set a WR at Drake said as much right after Muhammad's run.
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    #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by tandfman View Post
    Can you 'splain why this so? It seems counter-intuitive.
    As I noted earlier, the weather was ideal for fast full-lap sprinting for several reasons.

    1) Due to the earlier rainfall the atmosphere was saturated, thus less dense

    2) The barometric pressure at the time of the women's 400m hurdle final was 28.9 inHg

    3) The wind was almost zero, thanks again to the preceding rain.

    As for the track itself, being wet may have had a negative effect in training flats, but it spikes it was a non-issue. Indeed, if anything a wet track surface is faster than dry, in that there's reduced adhesive forces on foot contact.

    Bottom line - it was about as good as it gets to be running a lap sprint.
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    #4
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    NFL gurus first started talking about wet synthetic being faster than dry way back in the early '70s with the Dolphins, if memory serves.
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    #5
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    I cannot think of any other WR in the rain.
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    #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by beebee View Post
    I cannot think of any other WR in the rain.
    It wasnt raining when the 400 hurdle race went off.
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    #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by guru View Post
    As I noted earlier, the weather was ideal for fast full-lap sprinting for several reasons.

    1) Due to the earlier rainfall the atmosphere was saturated, thus less dense

    2) The barometric pressure at the time of the women's 400m hurdle final was 28.9 inHg

    3) The wind was almost zero, thanks again to the preceding rain.

    As for the track itself, being wet may have had a negative effect in training flats, but it spikes it was a non-issue. Indeed, if anything a wet track surface is faster than dry, in that there's reduced adhesive forces on foot contact.

    Bottom line - it was about as good as it gets to be running a lap sprint.
    "saturation" has no effect at all, the only thing that matters is the fraction of H2O molecules in the air (dew point is the most useful proxy), not the actual proportion (RH) of the possible H2O. It is not H2O relative to itself that matters, only that there are enough to reduce the air density. You can say what you are saying a 100 times and it does not make it right and it just confuses a technical point, and one that has very low empirical magnitude. The pressure (2) and wind (3) are more relevant; (1) is a footnote.

    As for footing, my memory is that the track was damp but not wet.

    Since I retired I no longer have easy access to hourly weather data that I used to have, my rough estimate is that the dew point had fallen with the weather change and the dew point was a relatively unremarkable 70F at the time of the women's race (not a bad reading but not one that would have much impact on the performances. Not results links at the time gave some weather detail.

    The 28.9 in HG is certainly not right for a typical pressure reading, it might have been 29.9 or 29.8, but 28.x is VERY low (e.g., hurricane)
    Last edited by 26mi235; 08-10-2019 at 10:52 AM.
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by 26mi235 View Post
    "saturation" has no effect at all, the only thing that matters is the fraction of H2O molecules in the air (dew point is the most useful proxy), not the actual proportion (RH) of the possible H2O. It is not H2O relative to itself that matters, only that there are enough to reduce the air density. You can say what you are saying a 100 times and it does not make it right and it just confuses a technical point, and one that has very low empirical magnitude. The pressure (2) and wind (3) are more relevant; (1) is a footnote.
    Water relative to itself? What on earth does that mean? I don't see anything in the post to which you responded that says anything about water relative to itself, in air or otherwise, and it sounds like nonsense.
    Last edited by trackCanuck; 08-10-2019 at 10:47 AM.
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    #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by beebee View Post
    I cannot think of any other WR in the rain.
    Eaton's Dec WR at the 2012 Trials!
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    #10
    My concern with a wet track has to do with footing, not atmospheric conditions. Even athletes at this level can take a misstep approaching the hurdle. One heel strike before the spikes dig into the track can cause disaster. This can happen on dry or wet surfaces.
    I don't know if any one uses HJ spikes, with a couple of heel spikes, but that would be one
    Precaution.
    Future performances, with someone challenging down the stretch, on a dry track....
    I expect will result in an even faster time.
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