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    Leadville Trail 100 - History of the Leadville Trail 100 Mile Running Race
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    Leadville Trail 100
    History of the Leadville Trail 100 Mile Running Race

    History is fragile; easily lost, forgotten and sometimes distorted. The Leadville Trail 100 is an iconic race with a rich history. This history has been compiled and told in excellent fashion by authors Marge Hickman and Steve Siguaw. Both have witnessed the 36 year race history of this 100 miles of racing at high altitude. Marge is a fourteen-time finisher and 1985 female champion and Steve is 6th ranked all-time for most finishes with eighteen. The book opens with forwards by Frank Shorter and Marshall Ulrich who offer their unique experiences with this race. A number of the runners including the legendary Ann Trason tell their memories at Leadville. The inclusion of these first hand race memories throughout the book is effective in telling this story and giving insight about the sport.

    The race is thoroughly chronical over its history with all finisher listed in the book. One of the most important aspects of this story that is emphasized is the proper recognitions of Jim Butera as the race founder in 1983.

    If you’ve read “Born to Run” you owe it to yourself to learn the rest of the story of The Tarahumara Indians of Mexico visit to the race in 1992, 1993, and 1994. As a running historian I particularly enjoyed the chapter “In the Footsteps of Legends” which gives brief descriptions of the many people who are the history of this race.

    Leadville Trail 100 is a quick read and offers a rich array of ultramarathon and trail running advice. Marge Hickman makes a point to encourage women to be a part of this race as either a pacer or competitor and to “get a sense of what it’s like and experience the unexpected.”

    I thank Marge and Steve for setting the record straight about the true history of Leadville Trail 100, and presenting this story of this unique and difficult race.

    Here’s a link to order your copy: http://www.leadvilletrail100history.com/index.html

    Gary Corbitt
    Curator: Ted Corbitt Archives
    Historian: National Black Marathoners Association
    August 2019
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    #2
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    I stayed in a motel in Leadville summer before last and I could barely sleep because I felt I was gulping for air. I can't imagine any kind of running there, much less ultra-distance!
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    #3
    While I was at a meeting in Vail, I drove up to Leadville to see it, and my ears popped the whole way up there from the change in pressure.
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    #4
    About 10-15 yrs ago I was at a meeting in Keystone, which is almost as high as Leadville (9,000 feet). I went for a run in the afternoon and that nite I had a blinding headache - I mean blinding. Did not dawn on me for several hours until I realized it was the altitude. Didn't run anymore at that meeting.
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    #5
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    Going from sea level to 9000 ft in a day is not easy.....going from Boulder was bad enough....

    A friend of mine ran Leadville 34 years ago....I ran 20 miles over Hope Pass along side....it wasn't too bad ....but doing the whole thing seemed rather crazy....
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by bambam1729 View Post
    About 10-15 yrs ago I was at a meeting in Keystone, which is almost as high as Leadville (9,000 feet). I went for a run in the afternoon and that nite I had a blinding headache - I mean blinding. Did not dawn on me for several hours until I realized it was the altitude. Didn't run anymore at that meeting.
    I can only imagine! The highest altitude at which I have ever run was in Mexico City and some other similar Mexican cities. I just understood that my long runs were going to be about a minute per mile slower. The degree of difficulty in Puebla was higher, as I ran in the mornings about the time the buses started running. Pollution standards for public transportation back in the late 70's left something to be desired.
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