Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #71
    I would really like to see some testing done on this by someone who obviously doesn't have a stake in it in one direction or another.

    One thing I do know is that even if they are not an advantage now, some composite material is eventually going to come along that provides the perfect combination of strength and energy return, and by then, we will be too far down the rabbit hole.

    Also, I can't find a plot of the T43 world record in the 400. The furthest record back I can find is that Pistorius set a world record of 47.49 in the 2008 Paralympics.

    Another thing I would like to know is whether they gain an advantage from the way they run the race, because they s100m split faster than the last, I wonder if the rest of the field serves as a sort of rabbit
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    #72
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    IAAF says no Leeper in Doha

    story on home page
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    #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotDutra5 View Post
    Whatever solution this board comes up with is going to matter little when the powers at be attempt to legislate. If they try and ban the use of the blades, the court of public opinion will bury them.
    You're kidding right?

    The Court of Public Opinion, at least in NZ, never supported the likes of Pistorius to be able to compete with able-bodied athletes.

    I admire the achievements of these guys (and gals) but it is ridiculous to think that the wearing of a prosthetic should be allowed. It is even ridiculous that the IAAF even entertains the idea.
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    #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Tuariki View Post
    I admire the achievements of these guys (and gals) but it is ridiculous to think that the wearing of a prosthetic should be allowed. It is even ridiculous that the IAAF even entertains the idea.
    Blame the CAS, not IAAF.

    IAAF originally banned the prosthetics, then Pistorius appealed to CAS and won.
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    #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tuariki View Post
    You're kidding right?
    Not at all.
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    #76
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    How in the world will they ever figure this out? By what analysis will they be able to tell if someones race time is due to prosthetics vs. weather, diet, muscle strain, sleep patterns, moon phase, muscle mass, coaching, training, natural talent, running form, genetics, wind direction, etc. There are so many variables to a runners time, especially in the sprints where we are talking about .01 of a second. Isn't that what runners focus on? Trying to find that optimal algorithm of training, diet, coaching, etc. to give them their best chance of the fastest time at just the right moment (ie. Olympic final)?
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    #77
    Quote Originally Posted by 58Commander View Post
    How in the world will they ever figure this out? By what analysis will they be able to tell if someones race time is due to prosthetics vs. weather, diet, muscle strain, sleep patterns, moon phase, muscle mass, coaching, training, natural talent, running form, genetics, wind direction, etc. There are so many variables to a runners time, especially in the sprints where we are talking about .01 of a second. Isn't that what runners focus on? Trying to find that optimal algorithm of training, diet, coaching, etc. to give them their best chance of the fastest time at just the right moment (ie. Olympic final)?
    The focus will have to be on the ability of the prosthesis to store and return energy placed on it. Then, comparing that to the ability of an average leg, make the call. Perhaps making a direct comparison of athletes who run with a single prosthesis would be better.

    In the case of Leeper, many on this site have mentioned that he gets faster in the second half of the race, in contrast to most other athletes. Given that the running mechanics are so different, and there is no accumulation of lactic acid in the prosthetic itself, it is possible that a well designed device could provide an advantage. As Jumbo said earlier in this thread, the quality of advanced composite materials is rapidly improving, and at some point, will inevitably provide an advantage. At least for athletes using two of them.
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    #78
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    According to Wikipedia, Blake Leeper's best 400m is 44.42 while his best 100m is only 10.91. I would expect any able-bodied sub 44.5 runner to not be any slower than about 10.65 at 100m.
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    #79
    Quote Originally Posted by Trickstat View Post
    According to Wikipedia, Blake Leeper's best 400m is 44.42 while his best 100m is only 10.91. I would expect any able-bodied sub 44.5 runner to not be any slower than about 10.65 at 100m.
    I think his times over 500 and 600 could be more revealing of the advantage rather than shorter distances.
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    #80
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    Correct outcome. Advantage/disadvantage is irrelevant, blade running is a different event. Shifting the burden of proof to the athlete (especially for someone almost everyone would feel and root for) is just a way of making sure they can't compete in the championships without outright stating it (scared of looking cruel).
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