Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    one problem with relay data is that not all legs are created equal, with second-leggers very frequently producing anomalously fast splits.
    Quote Originally Posted by Powell View Post
    I would guess that's because the first handoff is much harder to time accurately.
    Sounds logical, but historically we've got pretty solid videotape handoff data that we're quite happy with our major-championship split data.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    Sounds logical, but historically we've got pretty solid videotape handoff data that we're quite happy with our major-championship split data.
    I agree, but so why call fast 2nd legs "anomalous"? Some teams put their best runners on second leg, in order to get out of traffic. Somebody pointed out the exchange being in the zone, which makes sense to me.

    Allyson "anomalous" Felix ran some of those 2nd legs, blowing the race wide open. For some reason, they moved her to 3rd in Beijing (I just watched that race again, as well as Rio, on YouTube). US was way behind, but Allyson ran a great leg and got us into the lead, only to have Williams-Mills walk McCorory down. In Rio, they ran her anchor.

    If splits are taken when the baton passes the middle of the exchange zone, all the legs are the same distance, except for cutting in from outer lanes at the break.
    Cheers,
    Alan Shank
    Woodland, CA, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Shank View Post
    If splits are taken when the baton passes the middle of the exchange zone, all the legs are the same distance, except for cutting in from outer lanes at the break.
    If the track is properly marked, and the runners don't cut in immediately to the pole bur rather go in a straight line from the cut-in point to the point where the next curve begins in lane one, then they should all theoretically be able to run the same distance.
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    Is Francena McCorory retired? I couldn't find any info one way or the other.

    She was in Rio. She was part of a 4x2 in April '17.

    diamondleague.com has her with: 400m, 55.70, Landover, MD (USA), 20.07.2019

    55.7 is pretty slow for a 49.4 runner

    I had hoped she would "get it together" and win and individual gold.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fortius19 View Post
    Is Francena McCorory retired? I couldn't find any info one way or the other.
    On the start list for gothenburg tomorrow.
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    I miss McCorory!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Shank View Post
    I agree, but so why call fast 2nd legs "anomalous"? Some teams put their best runners on second leg, in order to get out of traffic. Somebody pointed out the exchange being in the zone, which makes sense to me.

    Allyson "anomalous" Felix ran some of those 2nd legs, blowing the race wide open. For some reason, they moved her to 3rd in Beijing (I just watched that race again, as well as Rio, on YouTube). US was way behind, but Allyson ran a great leg and got us into the lead, only to have Williams-Mills walk McCorory down. In Rio, they ran her anchor.

    If splits are taken when the baton passes the middle of the exchange zone, all the legs are the same distance, except for cutting in from outer lanes at the break.
    Cheers,
    Alan Shank
    Woodland, CA, USA
    The 2nd leg has the slight advantage of a flying start with no 'traffic'.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trickstat View Post
    The 2nd leg has the slight advantage of a flying start with no 'traffic'.
    Exactly! 3rd and 4th leg runners run into the back of other runners, have to run wide, have to chop stride to avoid other runners etc. etc...I'd say this is pretty much why there is any 'discrepancy'. It would also be interesting to see if the cut-over angle did actually make any difference in reality, but the flying start/no traffic is the main reason for me.

    So, will any of you be bold and predict who will be selected on that US 4x4 team for the final in Doha? Surely Francis, Wimbley and...?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiederganger View Post
    So, will any of you be bold and predict who will be selected on that US 4x4 team for the final in Doha? Surely Francis, Wimbley and...?
    McLaughlin I'm going to bet as a sure 3rd member. After that not sure.
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    Senior Member
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    The second leg also gets a turn in outer lanes with turns that are not as tight as Lane 1.
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