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Thread: Danger sign?

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    Danger sign?
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    I know we had a long thread on this before but I couldn't help but notice Bryce Hoppel's 1:47.48 fourth place at the Pan Am Games and wondered...is this a danger sign reflecting our too long track season burnout. It's a reality that sometimes the human body, no matter how well conditioned, just gets tired and form deteriorates.

    I'm hoping that all the NCAA world champ qualifiers do their best in Doha...but I'm not very confident.
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    #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannon View Post
    is this a danger sign reflecting our too long track season burnout.
    Too many variables to determine. Some athletes thrive on the work-load; some buckle. Some 'burn out' psychologically; some only get stronger. It's the coach's job to balance the demands properly, knowing that each athlete is different, and despite your best efforts, an athlete will slump with no discernible cause.
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    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Cannon View Post
    I know we had a long thread on this before but I couldn't help but notice Bryce Hoppel's 1:47.48 fourth place at the Pan Am Games and wondered...is this a danger sign reflecting our too long track season burnout. It's a reality that sometimes the human body, no matter how well conditioned, just gets tired and form deteriorates.

    I'm hoping that all the NCAA world champ qualifiers do their best in Doha...but I'm not very confident.
    It really depends on the individual. The long NCAA season worked for Clayton Murphy in 2016. After more than 30 races under his belt in 2016, Murphy was able to run 1:42.93 in the Olympic Final to win the bronze medal.
    Bryce Hoppel has never competed internationally. So, the Pan-Am Games might be a good chance for him to get some experience before going to Doha next month.
    But I agree that this season is even more of a challenge for NCAA athletes because it goes into the month of October.
    Last edited by TWalsh; 08-12-2019 at 07:08 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TWalsh View Post
    But I agree that this season is even more of a challenge for NCAA athletes because it goes into the month of October.
    Long-sighted coaches will see it as a boon, as they have more time to build the phases/rest periods. Periodization is not magically linked to a 12-month macrocycle. Athletic bodies can continue to build on previous phases with the proper work/rest cycles. The biggest puzzle to solve is how much to peak for each major phase leading to a championship - NCAA, USATF, IAAF. Each peak can surpass the previous if the coach and athlete are in sync. It does, however, take a body and mind that are very tough. Not everyone is 'strong' enough.
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    NCAA athletes have generally struggled in the majors. Of course it's not an absolute rule and you can find many counterexamples, but as a general trend, it has been an issue. This season is likely going to be even tougher, because they already had to re-peak one after the NCAAs.
    Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    Long-sighted coaches will see it as a boon, as they have more time to build the phases/rest periods. Periodization is not magically linked to a 12-month macrocycle. Athletic bodies can continue to build on previous phases with the proper work/rest cycles. The biggest puzzle to solve is how much to peak for each major phase leading to a championship - NCAA, USATF, IAAF. Each peak can surpass the previous if the coach and athlete are in sync. It does, however, take a body and mind that are very tough. Not everyone is 'strong' enough.
    Everything you say is true. But the season is more of a challenge for NCAA athletes going into October because of so many physical and mental factors that come into play. Many athletes are venturing into uncharted territory for the first time for something that is completely individual. There are so many physical and mental aspects that just can't be measured when an athlete goes from indoor track in January, and unexpectedly finishes their season in October, for the first time ever. Sure, athletes can follow the book of regeneration, and multiple peaks during a season. But some of that process for a first timer is a crap shoot. Especially the mental part.
    Last edited by TWalsh; 08-12-2019 at 07:09 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TWalsh View Post
    But some of that process for a first timer is a crap shoot. Especially the mental part.
    Which is why the coaches' role is paramount.
    Hopefully this ain't their first rodeo.
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    #8
    Curious to know if Hoppel is still with his college coach, or did he switch coaches once he turned pro.
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by TWalsh View Post
    Curious to know if Hoppel is still with his college coach, or did he switch coaches once he turned pro.
    If I remember correctly, he was asked after one of the rounds at USATF and he said he is still there.
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