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    wJT China
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    I give up! Too many names that look the same - even T&FN and IAAF can't agree how to spell them.

    T&FN - H Lu
    IAAF - H Lyu

    Then there's Liu, Lijuan Ge and Li Zhang and Gu and Su and Yu (but not Mi).

    I like Chen Chen and Ying Wang and Sun and Jin and Dai (all top 100 world rankers).

    I imagine our names must be just as confusing (to nitwits like moi) to them.
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    #2
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    we make no effort to follow the IAAF's transliterations
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    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    we make no effort to follow the IAAF's transliterations
    Since they ARE the international arbiters of the sport, I would think it in your best interests to do precisely that. Otherwise your patrons are left wondering Hu's on first?
    Last edited by Atticus; 07-13-2019 at 06:29 PM.
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    #4
    Both names are techincally incorrect. Her surname (Chinese do not usually call it a last name) is 吕, which is Lü in hanyu pinyin. However, the pronunciation of Lü is closer to Lyu than Lu, so Iaaf is more correct I guess?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juicy News View Post
    Both names are technically incorrect. Her surname (Chinese do not usually call it a last name) is 吕, which is Lü in hanyu pinyin. However, the pronunciation of Lü is closer to Lyu than Lu, so Iaaf is more correct I guess?
    Interesting. But even if the IAAF chose to spell it 'Lyou', wouldn't it behoove everyone in the Roman alphabet countries to do likewise, just to be standardized?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    I imagine our names must be just as confusing (to nitwits like moi) to them.
    Trust me, when these names are spelled out in romanizations instead of being shown in characters, it takes 1 or 2 seconds for a native speaker like moi to realise who they are refered to, as well. Visuals are important...

    On the other hand, western names are never confusing to us as they come up frequently enough in the mainstream culture of the world. Indian and African names perhaps are, to a certain extent.
    Last edited by xw; 07-14-2019 at 01:57 AM.
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    #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by xw View Post
    On the other hand, western names are never confusing to us as they come up frequently enough in the mainstream culture of the world.
    Good point. Americans expect the whole world to do things our way, and other countries are used to having to it many ways. Stop enabling us!
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    #8
    If you really want to make your brain ache, consider this article on the considerations for name recording in computer systems.
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    #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    Good point. Americans expect the whole world to do things our way, and other countries are used to having to it many ways. Stop enabling us!
    Computer age has made American English a pretty universal "lingua franca." Just looking at Facebook posts from Slovakia, it is mind-boggling how many terms became co-opted with transliteration into Slovak. "To share" becomes "šérovať," "to like" "lajkovať" and on, and on. Linguists must be pulling their hair out.
    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
    by Thomas Henry Huxley
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    #10
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    Incidentally, she broke the AR for the 3rd time this season at the Chinese trials, with a throw of 67.98m, which is also a new WL.
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