Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    Quote Originally Posted by TWalsh View Post
    Latvian heptathlete Laura Ikaunice (6518 this year), will not be competing in Doha.
    Any idea why? Injury?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiederganger View Post
    That is not correct. From what I have read, she was born to Nigerian parents from Anambra state, a southern state in Nigeria. Born as Ebelechukwu Agbapuonwu, she moved, converted to Islam, and became naturalised as a Bahraini not until 2014, going over with her Nigerian Coach. So whilst for her athletics career she was Bahraini, for most of her life she was Nigerian, not Bahraini.
    ATFS Annual and Mark Butler claim otherwise.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Powell View Post
    ATFS Annual and Mark Butler claim otherwise.
    From what I know (as a Nigerian athletics follower) her father is indeed Bahraini although there are conflicting reports even among the Nigerian media however most of what all Wiederganger posted is true. She was based in Port Harcourt, Nigeria and trained by coach John Obeya. She was also the 2013 Nigerian school champion in Port Harcourt I believe. It was actually coach Obeya that moved to Bahrain to work as a sprint coach with their athletics federation who eventually brought Salwa over to Bahrain in 2014.
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    What about the name change? With a Bahraini father, it would make sense that she had an Arabic name to start with.

    Also, Rakia Al-Gassra, the 11.12/22.65 sprinter, was Bahraini born.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Powell View Post
    I don't believe they're really doing it on purpose. More likely they're just haven't figured out how to go through the whole process effectively. As I noted above, some events have number well below the target, with the w800 being an extreme example (only 39 entrants compared to the target of 48).
    I find that hard to believe. They have fulltime programmers that came up with the world rankings, but they can't figure out how to correctly count accepted athletes? Takes me less than a minute to figure it out: Anyone enters more than 4, one is an alternate, anyone other than the country with the defending champion or DL winner (or winner of the alternative competitions) enters more than three, one is an alternate...done.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Powell View Post
    What about the name change? With a Bahraini father, it would make sense that she had an Arabic name to start with.
    The Nigerian sources I read quote both her parents as Nigerian. Her Nigerian-born name also backs this up. As you say, if she were born to a Bahraini father, you would expect a more typically Muslim name, not Nigerian. But who knows. Anyway, Mark Butler is a statistician, I am not sure why you think he would be anymore accurate than the Nigerian press. Although as mentioned, there are even conflicting elements in some of those.

    Either way, the fact remains, Bahraini father or not, she was raised in Nigeria and did not transfer allegiance until 2014. And that under dubious circumstances.
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    Quote Originally Posted by norunner View Post
    I find that hard to believe. They have fulltime programmers that came up with the world rankings, but they can't figure out how to correctly count accepted athletes? Takes me less than a minute to figure it out: Anyone enters more than 4, one is an alternate, anyone other than the country with the defending champion or DL winner (or winner of the alternative competitions) enters more than three, one is an alternate...done.
    You're forgetting this is the IAAF we are talking about. If their website and IG/Twitter are anything to go by, the qualifications process is being run by kids with no clue.
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    Quote Originally Posted by norunner View Post
    I find that hard to believe. They have fulltime programmers that came up with the world rankings, but they can't figure out how to correctly count accepted athletes? Takes me less than a minute to figure it out: Anyone enters more than 4, one is an alternate, anyone other than the country with the defending champion or DL winner (or winner of the alternative competitions) enters more than three, one is an alternate...done.
    I'm talking about the whole invite process, not simply counting athletes. The way I believe the process works now is something like this: first they wait to see how many Q athletes are nominated, then they send out invitations to the next best-ranked athletes, wait for response from national federations, then, if it turns out they still haven't reached the target number, they send out more invitations etc. After a couple of iterations of this process, they will run out of time and stop. A better way would be for federations to nominate everyone, including the non-Q athletes, who they would potentially like to send to the WC, and for the IAAF to create a waiting list, which they would use to figure out who qualifies.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiederganger View Post
    Anyway, Mark Butler is a statistician, I am not sure why you think he would be anymore accurate than the Nigerian press.
    In case you didn't know, Mark Butler is the guy who prepares the official athlete bios for all IAAF championship meets. I'm talking about this: https://media.aws.iaaf.org/competiti...f7198e2e70.pdf (the 2017 version).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiederganger View Post
    The Nigerian sources I read quote both her parents as Nigerian. Her Nigerian-born name also backs this up. As you say, if she were born to a Bahraini father, you would expect a more typically Muslim name, not Nigerian.
    Out of the more recent Bahraini imports (Rose Chelimo, Mimi Belete, Kemi Adekoya, Albert Rop etc.), none has assumed a Muslim name when they switched, so it doesn't appear to be the standard these days. There's a possibility that with a dual nationality, Naser had two names to start with, so to say - one she used in Nigeria, another one in Bahrain.
    Last edited by Powell; 09-20-2019 at 01:27 PM.
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