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    70-year-old marathon runner accused of cheating found dead
    #1
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    A sad story....but what an oddball....started running marathons at 60 and apparently started cutting courses right from the start or not long after.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/sport...=.cac5ffa8b0eb
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    #2
    Maybe I should post this one the "clueless" thread. But the previous WR was not 4:10 as the article claims. That's probably the second place time at the LA marathon.

    https://sports.yahoo.com/man-accused...140436726.html
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    #3
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    Some 70-year olds have run 2:54 (at 74) and a bit faster recently at age 70.
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    #4
    About 35 years ago, we had a local age-group runner that was cheating by traveling to big city marathons and slipping into the races late to win his division with national class times.

    Before the age of transponders we set up teams of monitors to catch him in the act, and, on about our third effort caught him redhanded.

    We had prevously caught a different runner doing the same thing, and, in that case had publicly exposed him as a cheat.

    In this second case, our association president interviewed him and told him that if he ever planned to do another marathon, he was to inform us ahead of time so we could confirm his result. We did not file a grievance, or hold a formal hearing, but got the desired result in that he never ran another race.

    The decision by our local chairman, endorsed by the rest of our team, was based on an observation in the interview that the guy had so much of his ego invested in these fictional accomplishments, that exposure as a fraud to his family, friends, and coworkers, might make him suicidal.

    I have felt ever since that we did the right thing, and have been troubled by the investigative teams that expose the frauds, with no consideration of the effects on the cheaters. Unfortunately, the latest case suggests that psychological issues should be considered.

    Oh, and as far as our cheater we gently eased out of the sport: About two years after his racing retirement, we read a long article in the local paper about his climbing Mt Everest and got a good chuckle.
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    #5
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    Frank Meza's being 'outed' as a marathon cheater began with this (quickly huge) thread on LetsRun:

    https://www.letsrun.com/forum/flat_r...thread=9307635


    And ended, for the most part, with this post-death thread:

    https://www.letsrun.com/forum/flat_r...thread=9476420
    Last edited by Master Po; 07-06-2019 at 10:01 AM.
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Master Po View Post
    Frank Meza's being 'outed' as a marathon cheater began with this (quickly huge) thread on LetsRun:

    https://www.letsrun.com/forum/flat_r...thread=9307635


    And ended, for the most part, with this post-death thread:

    https://www.letsrun.com/forum/flat_r...thread=9476420
    Never heard of they guy before but it seems he was a hard core, well planned, long term cheater who refused every opportunity to come clean or just to disappear and stop bullshitting everybody.

    If he killed himself because of being exposed, well, that's only on him.

    And, as for malmo faking the high moral ground and whining about cyber bullying, well, I piss myself laughing.....
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    #7
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    Had an interesting discussion about this on Twitter yesterday. I had no idea the pro-cheating crowd was so strong in road racing.

    But to back up a bit, earlier this year, we had suicides in figure skating and equestrian by individuals whom the Center for SafeSport had taken action against regarding allegations of sexual misconduct.

    In one case, multiple victims, who were underage at the time, had come forward, and the Center felt the evidence initially presented was strong enough to warrant an interim suspension while the entire process played out.

    In the other case, an entire SafeSport investigation had played out, and the final verdict rendered (pending appeal) and after his ban was made public, more victims came forward.

    In both cases, there has been a very vocal crowd who feels that SafeSport murdered these guys. Basically they feel that unless actions are able to be prosecuted criminally, then there should never be anything done. In both cases, statutes of limitations made criminal prosecution impossible.

    Circling back to road race cheaters...

    I absolutely do not support people who take these issues too far. I think it is fair game to discuss the actions of a person who intentionally cheats to gain something in life. I don't think it is fair game to take it outside the scope of those actions.

    A lot of the criticism revolves around the marathoninvestigation website. I did not follow this case closely, but I have seen a few of their cases over the years.

    One person on Twitter was upset that they published the name, age, city, and photos of people... but these are all things from the race website. They are not out stalking people, they are publishing public race photos that are relevant to the discussion of whether or not someone cheated.

    And it seems like in a lot of these cases, people are serial offenders.

    I think public discussion has value. Knowing how someone cheated helps race directors figure out what measures they need to take to make it harder to cheat.

    Fear of having your actions exposed, and that being embarrassing, is a fairly strong deterrent for people. Having a sporting culture that turns a blind eye to cheating, is a bad thing, IMO.

    IMO, how much attention a cheater is given should be influenced by the following...
    - Was the cheating intentional?
    - How did they react when asked about the cheating?
    - Have they cheated in other races?
    - Are they using the results to leverage other things in life?
    - Did their results deprive others of medals/prize money/records?
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    #8
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    The classic serial cheater was Kip Litton....not only cutting courses but making up an entire race he won!

    The debunkers zeroed in on the West Wyoming Marathon, the one race that Litton had supposedly won outright. One of them came across a Web cache of the race’s defunct home page, which included this caveat: “With a low entry fee, there will be no goodie bags, no shirts, no photographer and no finishers medals.”

    On January 11, 2011, a poster called Liptodakip wrote, “Still curious about the west Wyoming marathon. 29 runners total. And he won it. Anyone know anything about it? Is it a real race? The main page is down and now the results are gone. (was up last week). did he make up an entire race? That would be bold!”

    Yes, it would. And, yes, he did. LetsRun exploded: West Wyoming was Litton’s pièce de résistance, and even his most indignant accusers had to concede their perverse admiration. In this race, the key to winning was ingeniously uncomplicated: Make the whole thing up! For his fabricated marathon, Litton had assembled not only a Web site but also a list of finishers and their times (plus name, age, gender, and home town), and created a phantom race director, who responded to e-mail queries. It occurred to Kyle Strode that six months earlier, when he had raised questions about Litton to “Richard Rodriguez,” the reply (“Wow, that’s quite a scenario!”) had omitted a crucial detail. When Richard Rodriguez looked in the mirror, Litton looked back.

    In concocting the fantasy, someone had gone so far as to create a post-race testimonial for the Web site Marathon Guide. “Small race, with only a couple dozen runners,” a post there said. “Bring your own gels; only water is available on course. Out-and-back route. No spectators to speak of. Sounds like a downer, but the view and the town are so worth it! Cross Wyoming off of your list and visit one of the most beautiful towns in the US at the same time.”


    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...6/marathon-man
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    #9
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    Pretty delusional fellow....cuts the course dramatically to record incredible times starting back in 2014 and keeps doing it....

    Why he was allowed to enter the LA Marathon this year is another question....
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by polevaultpower View Post
    Had an interesting discussion about this on Twitter yesterday. I had no idea the pro-cheating crowd was so strong in road racing. [SNIP][
    Yep, and so many Letsrun "cayboard cowards" backing down as fast as their weak, malnourished, genetically inferior slow twitch fibres and pathetically feeble intellects allowed in order to avoid any responsibility in the matter.

    More importantly, I have to say your post is probably the most elegantly written texts I've read on these boards in at least 10 years, maybe ever.

    I swoon at your feet in admiration.
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