Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #11
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    The hitch kick is used to fight forward rotation....



    https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...Rk1JWnFVdPQLtM
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    #12
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    You can't push the center of gravity forward after takeoff... your rotation around it in flight is the only thing you can control...
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    #13
    I still don't understand why this has changed. Look back at any of the 'old' jumpers - Lewis, Powell, Boston, Beamon, etc. They are all landing and falling forward, not backwards/sideways like today's jumpers.
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    #14
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    My theory is that on the approach, every part of your body is essentially moving forward at the same rate but when the jumper takes off, the takeoff foot is "anchored" to the ground significantly longer than each of the approach steps.

    The body is now a lever rotating around the fulcrum of the takeoff foot. Therefore, the jumper is rotating forward on takeoff and will end up flat on his face if he/she doesn't jump up and essentially backwards to stop the rotation.
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    #15
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    I am not a coach. I don't know the physics, optimum angle, penultimate step or rotation tendency of horizontal jumping but in the last 80 of my 88 years I have competed in and officiated hundreds (thousands?) of horizontal jump competitions from elementary to Olympics.
    Here is what I have learned:

    When I was very young (pre-teen) before I had any coaching, I used to try to "hitch kick" like Jesse Owens in the 1936 Olympic news reels. I thought he was gaining distance. I did not know I could not jump high enough or far enough to hitch kick. I jumped 23 ' in HS without any coaching or technique because I could run pretty fast. (9.7 100y on dirt). I have never had any problem with over rotating.

    When I got to college (1949-53), I learned the secret was to jump high, not far, and the distance would take care of its self. I practiced hitch kick but got better results by simply jumping up, concentrating on extending and dropping my feet at the last moment my momentum would carry me forward.

    I was not a world class jumper. I was a point scorer. I was a reliable 24 footer, occasionally breaching the 25 barrier (25-6 PB) under optimum conditions with not too many other events that day.

    I have, with their coach's permission/cooperation, made suggestions to HS jumpers with obvious requisite physique and speed that transformed natural 21 footers into 23 footers and 23 footers into 25 footers in a matter of weeks. (one prize 23 footer to 27 footer but that took a little longer)
    So, at risk of immodesty, I feel I know a little about horizontal jumping.
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    #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conor Dary View Post
    You can't push the center of gravity forward after takeoff... your rotation around it in flight is the only thing you can control...
    Of course you can, just as HJers and PVers push theirs BELOW the bar.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=cent...Yj8xuyKBUSpgM:

    As for the hitchkick's 'purpose', all LJ successful techniques counter forward rotation.
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    #17
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    You can push the center of gravity forward compared to a given part of your body, but you can't push it forward from its existing trajectory... at least not until some part of you is on the ground again.
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    #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by LopenUupunut View Post
    You can push the center of gravity forward compared to a given part of your body, but you can't push it forward from its existing trajectory... at least not until some part of you is on the ground again.
    The trajectory is indeed 'set', but you CAN affect where you'll hit the sand as you fly thru the air. So you try and push it as far 'forward' (vis-a-vis your body) as you can. When a PVer pikes over the bar, he's moving the CoG away from the hips by a lot.
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    #19
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    I doubt there is anything new in the world of LJ landings. Go online and find half-century old videos: Ralph Boston usually followed his feet into the sand, Ter-O often slid in on his right side, and Beamon sprang forward (probably due to his great speed and leg strength). And there was Tuariki, who tried his best to land head first.
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    #20
    I did go online before making this post. Most jumpers of previous eras, moved forward on way or another after landing, so the spot for measurement was where they feet landed, not where their butt/body fell backwards, as it is with today's jumpers.
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