Facts, Not Fiction

 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. Collapse Details
     
    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by dj View Post
    Follow tandfman's lead, that's the easiest, most expedient and most likely means of advancing your daughter.

    But be prepared for a challenge. I don't know how many people qualify to nationals from your region, but one question you might have to respond to would be: If your daughter was "on pace to win the [100m hurdle race]" and was at the last hurdle, how is it that her opponen hit the last hurdle and then fell and hit your daughter? I can see instances in which this can happen, but the most common would be that the other girl was ahead of your daughter at the last hurdle when the incident occurred and thus usually in better position to win. Be prepared to explain this in closer detail.
    In addition to my daughter winning every 100m hurdles event this year, as she did last year, we have plenty of videos of the incident. My daughter had just cleared the last hurdle when the other girl hit her hurdle and basically fell on top of my daughter's legs and feet. So trust me when I say that she would've won by at least a second as she was beginning her sprint to the finish while the other girl was just going over the hurdle. In a 16-18 second event, most competitors are reasonably close throughout the entire race.
    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
     
    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    Oh yes, s/he absolutely does if it interferes with another hurdler, as it did here.
    I was referring to Rule 163.4. The referee does not have to dq someone to provide relief.

    As far as knocking a hurdle into another lane, I don't see a violation of Rule 168.3. If the runner did not remain in her lane and interfered, that could be grounds for a dq, if that is the referee's decision.
    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
     
    #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Master403 View Post
    The referee does not have to dq the athlete that knocked down the hurdle to provide some relief. In this case, considering the injury, the only recourse seems to be an appeal to the committee. Given that there is a limit on the number of athletes, a successful appeal might bump an innocent qualifier. It could be a tough sell.

    As a referee I dealt with this a couple of times.

    At the high school county semis, a runner knocked the seventh hurdle into the adjacent lane, tripping the runner in that lane. I told the coach and fallen runner that I couldn't advance him, but I had an empty lane in the last heat. They took advantage of the rerun. He ran the race, was up with the leaders, crashed into the seventh hurdle and ended up in a crumpled heap in the same place as in the earlier race.

    In a JC regional qualifier, the men's hurdles was a crashfest. I counted 36 hurdles down on the track. A coach wanted me to dq a runner who knocked a hurdle into his lane. (She wanted to use as evidence a video shot on a phone from the stands on the other side.) I said I was sorry, but there was nothing I could do. Maybe you could tell your athlete if he doesn't want a downed hurdle in front of him, he should run faster. She replied Yeah, I already told him that.
    Thank you for your reply. 36 hurdles!!!!! Holy. My response about the "innocent qualifier" being bumped would be that had another hurdler not interfered with my daughter, that innocent qualifier would not have qualified.
    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
     
    #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Sleeping in Finland
    Posts
    4,340
    Quote Originally Posted by Birgie View Post
    In addition to my daughter winning every 100m hurdles event this year, as she did last year, we have plenty of videos of the incident. My daughter had just cleared the last hurdle when the other girl hit her hurdle and basically fell on top of my daughter's legs and feet. So trust me when I say that she would've won by at least a second as she was beginning her sprint to the finish while the other girl was just going over the hurdle. In a 16-18 second event, most competitors are reasonably close throughout the entire race.
    A second is a big margin; even at 18-second pace, it's still a five-meter advantage at the last hurdle. Of course I have no idea what the gap was to everybody else in the race, but the girl who tripped must have been much closer than that.
    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
     
    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Birgie View Post
    Thank you so much for your reply. Thankfully her team coach is also the Association's Youth Chair. I'm just so disappointed for her. She loves track and has been to the Junior Olympic finals every year since she was 7. We'll make sure her coach files a request for her. Thanks again!
    Good luck.

    Please do let us all know how this ends up.
    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
     
    #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    on task
    Posts
    11,688
    Quote Originally Posted by Master403 View Post
    The referee does not have to dq someone to provide relief.
    The referee is indeed OBLIGATED to DQ an athlete who has interfered with another competitor.
    I also don't understand how a runner already over the last hurdle and in the final sprint can possibly be interfered with by someone just going over the hurdle, a second (at least 6 meters) behind her.
    Reply With Quote
     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •