Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by HopStepJump View Post
    Act like you've been there.
    They have. And they know what a rare thing it is to represent your nation on the highest stage. There was absolutely nothing negative or demeaning about it. It's called 'Joy' and I will always enjoy seeing its use in that regard.

    edit - said a Thai sports reporter:

    “This is their new team, and they wanted to win,” he said. “This is a game of teamwork. Once you score a goal, of course you have to celebrate.”
    Last edited by Atticus; 06-13-2019 at 03:37 PM.
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    #32
    Could it possibly be considered disrespectful or insulting to the other team NOT to celebrate?
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    #33
    I've seen plenty of time where a player comes in and scores an important goal against his former club, and his "celebration" is muted out of respect for his former teammates and fans. I call it class.
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    #34
    Why is the Brazil women's team wearing 5 stars on their jersey. The men's team won the world cups. The French women's team doesn't wear 2 stars on their jersey. The US men's team doesn't wear 3 stars on their jersey.
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    #35
    Quote Originally Posted by tandfman View Post
    Could it possibly be considered disrespectful or insulting to the other team NOT to celebrate?
    No. Its considered having class. I have seen many international players score a goal and refuse to let their team-mates celebrate.

    I specifically remember Cristiano Ronaldo playing for Man U in the Euro Champions league, scoring against Sporting Lisbon (his former team) and refusing to celebrate. He actually told his team-mates to cut out the celebration. And this was a crucial goal, not the 10th goal
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    #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by mungo man View Post
    No. Its considered having class. I have seen many international players score a goal and refuse to let their team-mates celebrate.
    I specifically remember Cristiano Ronaldo playing for Man U in the Euro Champions league, scoring against Sporting Lisbon (his former team) and refusing to celebrate. He actually told his team-mates to cut out the celebration. And this was a crucial goal, not the 10th goal
    I agree. Which, of course, has nothing to do with this circumstance.
    When the Dream Team (Barcelona 1992) annihilated every other team (by an ave. of 44 pts), everyone understood they were witnessing greatness.
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    #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by mungo man View Post
    No. Its considered having class. I have seen many international players score a goal and refuse to let their team-mates celebrate.

    I specifically remember Cristiano Ronaldo playing for Man U in the Euro Champions league, scoring against Sporting Lisbon (his former team) and refusing to celebrate. He actually told his team-mates to cut out the celebration. And this was a crucial goal, not the 10th goal
    Exactly...it happens often in the men's game in Europe....

    In the FA Cup top Premier League teams like Man City sometimes meet non league sides and win easily the celebrations are rather muted...certainly by the 9th goal...then it becomes embarrassing....which the US women are completely incapable of.....

    The Thailand game showed not so much how good the U.S. women but how lousy Thailand is....
    Last edited by Conor Dary; 06-13-2019 at 06:08 PM.
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    #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    I agree. Which, of course, has nothing to do with this circumstance.
    When the Dream Team (Barcelona 1992) annihilated every other team (by an ave. of 44 pts), everyone understood they were witnessing greatness.
    It has everything to do with this circumstance. There is a time to celebrate and there is a time not to celebrate.

    As for the dream team. Charles Barkley showed a lot of crudeness / lack of class. Many in the media gave him a pass and still do. A few brave reporters criticized him.

    Speaking of Dream teams, in 2004, Lebron James was a rookie playing for team USA. After he scored a dunk, he ran down the court preening and the coach (Larry Brown) duly benched him for the rest of the game. Some coaches will not tolerate lack of class regardless of who does it.
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    #39
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    What's the deal with multiple UK teams? Do other international sports bodies do that or is it unique to women's soccer?
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    #40
    Quote Originally Posted by donley2 View Post
    What's the deal with multiple UK teams? Do other international sports bodies do that or is it unique to women's soccer?
    Unlike the IOC, which only recognizes Great Britain as a nation, FIFA recognizes the 4 British nations - England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland. One of the main reasons that GBR has trouble selecting a team for the Olympics, because they never compete as a combined team except for that. Its also the case in hockey (field).
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