Facts, Not Fiction

 
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 32
  1. Collapse Details
     
    #21
    I'm with gh. I don't think I'd ever seen ruction.
    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
     
    #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Woodland Park, CO
    Posts
    7,533
    It might have been the guy's tone, or....it might have been another example of dumbing-down of our schools, participation medals for everyone, etc. If his criticism targeted a small number of specific kids, in front of the rest of the class, and if those kids weren't the brightest ones to begin with (and he might not know as a sub), there could be a legitimate beef. If it was aimed at the class as a whole, with a sense of, "really? You guys aren't getting this? Come on, you guys are SMARTER than this!" well, we wouldn't want to hurt any feelings would we? I can see Ms Carpenter (9th grade), Mr. McKenna (10th grade), and Mr. Day (12th grade), excellent teachers all, doing that in a way that would both mildly shame us and yet wake us up and motivate us (we'll leave out Ms. Desjardins, 11th grade. She kept a monkey in a cage in her fireplace at home).
    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
     
    #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Right next to a Gator filled pond
    Posts
    4,683
    This seems to be lost on some posters but the writer and teacher is a woman. Her name is Shirley Keyron McDonald...thus the S.Keyron.

    She'll pop up with a google or two.
    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
     
    #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Woodland Park, CO
    Posts
    7,533
    Change my guy's to gal's, his to her, and he to she. Or maybe in this gender-ambiguous PC era, guy's to their, his to their, and he to they. :-)
    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
     
    #25
    Quote Originally Posted by NotDutra5 View Post
    This seems to be lost on some posters but the writer and teacher is a woman. Her name is Shirley Keyron McDonald...thus the S.Keyron.

    She'll pop up with a google or two.
    Yes, I Googled it when this question first came up on this thread. That's why I corrected myself in post #12.
    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
     
    #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    ???? ???? in Ronald MacDonald's Home Town, and once a Duck always a Duck.
    Posts
    10,910
    Quote Originally Posted by NotDutra5 View Post
    This seems to be lost on some posters but the writer and teacher is a woman. Her name is Shirley Keyron McDonald...thus the S.Keyron.

    She'll pop up with a google or two.
    ....does it really matter.... an opinion piece on substitute teaching....probably made the whole thing up.... A Russian troll playing with everyone's mind....
    Last edited by Conor Dary; 06-03-2019 at 11:04 PM.
    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
     
    #27
    After reading the article I have to agree with her. My recent experience with 20-somethings would indicate a lot of huge holes in today's educational system. The SF Bay Area public utility that employed me for 25 years regularly gave remedial math and English classes to folks with high school diplomas. Recently I received a short thank you card from a high school valedictorian with at least four grammar errors and fourth-grade handwriting, and I have a young adult relative who essentially cannot read and write.

    Since the the 70's - 80's when trickle down and property tax revolts took over, public education has mostly turned to shit and the kids are the victims.
    Last edited by bad hammy; 06-05-2019 at 01:07 AM.
    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
     
    #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Santa Barbara
    Posts
    929
    True or not, there are two shames in this account:

    1) In most US school settings English grammar is taught but is not emphasized or valued very much. In my years of evaluating applications for a major university we were specifically instructed not to penalize students for spelling or syntax. IMHO that is a national disgrace.

    2) This particular substitute sounds less like an "instructor" than a tone-deaf crusader bent on confrontation rather than mentoring. Angry people generally don't last long in classrooms even when they have tenure. My view after 30+years in public education is that the people most critical of the school system wouldn't last a day as a classroom teacher.
    Last edited by jc203; 06-05-2019 at 02:43 AM.
    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
     
    #29
    I am admittedly critical of the current state of public education in the US without any real thought that I personally could do better. Working or even communicating with kids is not my forte, and I'm confident that my grand total of zero progeny are much appreciative of my procreative restraint. . . .
    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
     
    #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    on task
    Posts
    11,370
    Quote Originally Posted by jc203 View Post
    1) In most US school settings English grammar is taught but in not emphasized or valued very much. In my years of evaluating applications for a major university we were specifically instructed not to penalize students for spelling or syntax. IMHO that is a national disgrace.
    While I am in a private school, I have graded the AP English Language exam for 10 years (stopped last year), so I am very familiar with public school products. And before anyone claims I'm only dealing with the cream of the crop in AP Lang, let me assure you that many AP Lang students are pushed into the class because it makes the schools look better, regardless of whether the student 'should' be in the class. I have given plenty of 1s to some semi-literate students, so here's my take (others will certainly have other perspectives):

    1. Spelling is no longer significant because a) there are more dyslexic students than previously thought and dyslexics have real problems spelling, no matter how much we think they should be able to. My own dyslexic daughter was on the Dean's List in college and always has to use Spell-check in her writing, which brings us to b) Spell-check is universally available.
    2. Grammar and syntax ARE indeed still very important. Non-standard English is ubiquitous, but it certainly denotes someone who doesn't even know it is non-standard, and that is a huge problem in the business world. It's hard for a client to entrust their business to someone who can't communicate well.
    3. Grammar, as a stand-alone subject, is WORTHLESS! 'Usage', on the other hand, is vital and can be examined/critiqued at every turn. "How could that have been better phrased?" Likewise, syntax is vital, with the same question in play.
    Last edited by Atticus; 06-05-2019 at 02:31 AM.
    Reply With Quote
     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •