Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    R.I.P. Bill Buckner
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    https://www.foxnews.com/sports/bill-...s-chicago-cubs

    So much more than 1 botched play. 22 seasons, never more than 40 walks or 40 strikeouts in any of them. Batting title, 2700+ hits.
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    #2
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    Very good player who had a very poor moment that has colored the career. RIP
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    #3
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    He was not the first, or last, athlete to botch a play.
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    #4
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    The late Mike Royko propagated Ron Berler's theorem called The ex-Cub factor. It dictates that no team with three or more former Cubs can possibly win the WS. Buckner's botched play was a poster child of this for years.
    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
    by Thomas Henry Huxley
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    #5
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    I remember that by Royko well.... Buckner should have stayed with the Cubs....

    Of course in 1984 the Cubs had their own blown grounder...

    The year was 1984, and the Cubbies had the Padres right where they wanted them in the NLCS. After taking the first two games by a combined score of 17-2, Chicago needed only one more win to claim its first NL pennant in four decades. However, that win never came. Ugliness followed ugliness as the Chicago Cubs managed to drop all three games in San Diego.

    In Game 3, Dennis Eckersley was the goat. The right-hander gave up nine hits and five runs as the Friars waltzed to a 7-1 win. Game 4 had the Cubs and Padres tied 5-5 in the ninth before Lee Smith allowed a single to Tony Gwynn and a walk-off home run to Steve Garvey.

    Game 5 was close until the late innings. With ace Rick Sutcliffe on the mound and a 3-0 lead in the sixth, things unraveled in a hurry. Sutcliffe gave up two hits, a walk, and two sac flies to make it a 3-2 game. Then, in the bottom of the seventh, first baseman Leon Durham botched an easy grounder that allowed the tying run to score. One Gwynn double and Garvey single later, San Diego had a 5-3 lead ó and thatís how it ended.


    https://www.sportscasting.com/mlb/ch...eason-history/
    Last edited by Conor Dary; 05-27-2019 at 10:33 PM.
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    #6
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    I think this was pretty much over looked but, IMHO, the real culprit (if you were a Red Sox fan) was whoever the hell was the Boston manager. One of the cardinal rules of baseball is that when you are leading a critical game in the 9th inning you have your best possible defense on the field. It was a well known fact that Bill B. had significant mobility issues and should never have been on the field in that situation. It was a monumental bone head decision by the manager and Buckner paid the price. (And, btw, cost me a sizeable wager )
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    #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by thedoorknobbroke View Post
    I think this was pretty much over looked but, IMHO, the real culprit (if you were a Red Sox fan) was whoever the hell was the Boston manager. One of the cardinal rules of baseball is that when you are leading a critical game in the 9th inning you have your best possible defense on the field. It was a well known fact that Bill B. had significant mobility issues and should never have been on the field in that situation. It was a monumental bone head decision by the manager and Buckner paid the price. (And, btw, cost me a sizeable wager )
    As a Mets fan I was on the other side of fandom for the play but this is absolutely correct. In addition, Bob Stanley had just wild pitched in the tying run so the game was tied for the Buckner play anyway. A lot of fans seem to think that the Red Sox win if he fields the ground ball and gets to the bag prior to Mookie Wilson (some don't think he would have).

    The grudge Red Sox fans held against Buckner may only be rivaled by the Bartman scenario in Chicago. Both fanbases should be ashamed of themselves for not being able to check their common sense in where it belongs.

    RIP Bill Buckner who was and excellent player.
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    #8
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    Bartman was treated about a hundred times worse than Buckner....it's no comparison...
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Conor Dary View Post
    Bartman was treated about a hundred times worse than Buckner....it's no comparison...
    If one has a spare 108 minutes, the ESPN documentary "Catching Hell" illustrates this very well.
    http://www.espn.com/video/clip/_/id/13883887
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    #10
    Great post and reply on Twitter:

    >>How many baseball players’ careers are overshadowed by a single unfortunate play? Buckner, Merkle, Branca, Owen. Carl Mays, but that’s really a whole different thing. Maybe Mitch Williams? Others?<<

    And the perfect reply (by The Wall Street Journal's Jason Gay):

    >>Casey<<
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