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    #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrJay View Post
    how about a Eaton, after an OT? How soon do they get back at it in training, not just light stuff, technique work, etc, but really hard?
    I bet Marra gave him two whole days off, before they were back at it.
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    #12
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    I've been taking a look at the 2014 season of the British decathlete Ashley Bryant when he started 6 decathlons. These were:

    April 26-27 - Woodford (a London suburb) DNF (looked like a serious effort but after 3 fouls in the SP he was DNF in 400 & DNS in PV.
    May 2-3 - Florence 7802
    May 23-24 - Bedford (English Combined Events Champs) DNF DNS HJ (I suspect conditions were not too good so he decided to save himself for the next weekend)
    May 31-June 1 - Gotzis 8141 (achieving the European qualifying mark he was chasing)
    July 28-29 - Glasgow (Commonwealth Games) 8109 (silver medal behind Damian Warner)
    August 12-13 - Zurich (European Champs) DNF (NH PV but first 7 events below par compared with previous 2 decs)

    This is an unusually high number of decs for a British international (and he did do some individual events in between them). The thing I do notice is that he twice completed a decathlon just one week after starting another, but each time the former dec turned out to be a long way short of a full 10 events with no completed 400 or PV or 1500 in particular. When he tried to follow up his medal winning performance in Glasgow 15 days later at the Euros he couldn't reproduce his form of his previous 2 comps. Of course, accumulated fatigue from the whole season could also have been a factor.
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    #13
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    of course, there is the school of thought that the average world-class decathlete's training load week in and week out is far greater than what it takes to do a decathlon proper.

    What was it that Daley Thompson always said? Something like, "Gruelling? I figure that it takes me 14 minutes of actual competition to complete a decathlon."
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    #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    "Gruelling?"
    I blame that on Jim McKay. I honestly think he thought the name of the event was the "Grueling Decathlon".
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    #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    of course, there is the school of thought that the average world-class decathlete's training load week in and week out is far greater than what it takes to do a decathlon proper.

    What was it that Daley Thompson always said? Something like, "Gruelling? I figure that it takes me 14 minutes of actual competition to complete a decathlon."
    Over the 2 days you probably use more energy on warm-up, practice throws, jumps & hurdles and strides to stay loose than you do competing.

    I remember a conversation with a decathlon coach where he told me that his most important job during the 2 days came at the end of day 1. This was about ensuring that an athlete who'd just finished the day with a 400 would be ready to start the next day with a 110H.

    Another factor is length of day. A decathlon comp that stands alone or is at a multi-events only meet tends to be a shorter day than one at a Champs that is scheduled alongside individual events. I know some athletes find the latter set-up more difficult despite the gaps perhaps providing more rest breaks. This may be because you need to spend more of the day warming-up. It can also mean that you have more time to dwell on a poor result in the previous event.
    Last edited by Trickstat; 04-23-2019 at 06:25 AM.
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    #16
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    How about Lindon Victor in 2017?

    I believe he did 3 decs in fairly quick succession--all between 8390 & the CR of 8539!

    And I thubk he also did a INdoor Heptathlon or two!
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    #17
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    He actually did three Heptathlons that year.
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    #18
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    Bill Toomey's 1969 season was obviously an aberration and is at the far end of what may be accomplished. He opened at Mt. SAC but only completed the first 8 events. Then from June to December he won nine decathlons, with seven scoring more than 8,000 points, ending with a WR. Kirst had the second highest score that year 2 points above Toomey's second greatest score. Toomey had the 3rd through 8th highest scores. He also managed a WR in the pentathlon in August. Its difficult looking back now 50 years (50 years !!! - yikes !!!) to contemplate what he put himself through and how he recovered.
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    #19
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    I remember that well. He was on a WR quest and KNEW he had it in him, so he just kept going and going and going . . . until he got it in December (after actually resting for almost 2 months).
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    #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    of course, there is the school of thought that the average world-class decathlete's training load week in and week out is far greater than what it takes to do a decathlon proper.

    What was it that Daley Thompson always said? Something like, "Gruelling? I figure that it takes me 14 minutes of actual competition to complete a decathlon."
    Is a decathlon physically gruelling? Not really, as Thompson pointed out - the physical effort is minor compared to training.

    However, they can be very psychologically draining due to:
    • the potentially long days
    • having to deal with uncertain start times for following events
    • the difficulty of achieving peak focus in different events, especially with the differing mental attitudes required by each event
    • (usually) managing a series of aches and even outright injuries.


    Put that all that together and Hans Selye will tell you the two days are a significant stressor that definitely requires effective recovery time.
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