Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #31
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    " The problem is that even intensive testing might not be enough to actually find the drug, if you go back to that “window of opportunity” concept mentioned above, where the window might be “open” for only three days. At the extreme, if an athlete was tested every single day by a trustworthy source, then you could have confidence. But at 3 days, your confidence in a “clean sample means clean athlete” paradigm has dropped considerably, maybe even entirely."
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    #32
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    This is why I still consider Bill Rogers the greatest marathon runner ever.
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    #33
    Quote Originally Posted by user4 View Post
    This is why I still consider Bill Rogers the greatest marathon runner ever.
    If you're going back to pre-drug days do the names Abebe Bikila and Frank Shorter mean anything to you?
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    #34
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    given that the "drug era" starts in the '50s, you hve to go back before BIkila and Shorter.
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    #35
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    Yeah it was all good before that...1904 Olympic Marathon..


    British-born Thomas Hicks of the United States ended up the winner of the event, although he was aided by measures that would not have been permitted in later years. Ten miles from the finish Hicks led the race by a mile and a half, but he had to be restrained from stopping and lying down by his trainers. From then until the end of the race, Hicks received several doses of strychnine (a common rat poison, which stimulates the nervous system in small doses) mixed with brandy. He continued to battle onwards, hallucinating, barely able to walk for most of the course. When he reached the stadium his support team carried him over the line, holding him in the air while he shuffled his feet as if still running. The judges decided this was acceptable, and gave him the gold medal. Hicks had to be carried off the track, and might have died in the stadium had he not been treated by several doctors.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Athl...n%27s_marathon
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    #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Conor Dary View Post
    More like what drug testing is there in NCAA basketball and football...
    It was good enough to keep Clemson's best defensive player out of the national championship. And keep in mind that NCAA track and field athletes are also subject to USADA/WADA testing so they're tested more than non-NCAA athletes.
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    #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    It was good enough to keep Clemson's best defensive player out of the national championship. And keep in mind that NCAA track and field athletes are also subject to USADA/WADA testing so they're tested more than non-NCAA athletes.
    Yea...people get caught...but considering the stakes and the incredibly small number of positives....and add in the fact few care.....well you decide...
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