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    Niyonsaba confirms hyperandrogenism
    #1
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    https://olympics.nbcsports.com/2019/...-testosterone/

    Francine Niyonsaba of Burundi, who won 800m silver medals behind Semenya at the 2016 Olympics and 2017 World Championships, said in an interview with the Olympic Channel that she has hyperandrogenism, the first time she’s spoken about it publicly.
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    #2
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    No big shocker here.
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    #3
    Curious to know how the IAAF's testosterone level was arrived at as 'normal.' Personally, it does not bother me as long as it is open and known and not hidden - masculinity and femininity lines are not strictly drawn.

    If these woman knew they had it and knew that this condition helps them why not be open at first instead of trying to hide it. If you put yourself out there to compete on the world stage under a World Governing body don't try to hide it - it just makes you look like you are trying to get away with something that you know gives you an advantage.

    Everybody is concerned with them being natural. Well they are natural - naturally different than most other woman - so what? If we all want it to be 100% hard work and dedication to training then wait till we clone everyone and then see who train harder and more efficiently. Until then nature dishes out all sorts of things that are unfair.
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    #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by proofs in the pudd'in View Post
    ....
    If these woman knew they had it and knew that this condition helps them why not be open at first instead of trying to hide it. ....
    who said they knew or that they tried to hide it?

    I'm guessing that probably (almost certainly?) the case is that they didn't have a clue before the first wonky results drew the IAAF's attention.
    Last edited by gh; 04-18-2019 at 02:46 AM.
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    who said they knew or that they tried to hide it?

    I'm guessing that probably (almost certainly?) the case that they didn't have a clue before the first wonky results drew the IAAF's attention.
    That's why I said 'if' - It seems from what some reports say that once they were accused or challenged then they said they have a condition. But I don't know since I have not followed this that closely.
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    #6
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    What does it matter if the athlete tried to hide it? It is still a serious competitive advantage.
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    #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by proofs in the pudd'in View Post
    If these woman knew they had it and knew that this condition helps them why not be open at first instead of trying to hide it.
    Even if she did know beforehand, there may be many reasons to be careful about presenting yourself as "the other" in Burundi and many other places in the world.


    • Burundi's security services and ruling party youth league members killed, raped, abducted, beat, and intimidated suspected opponents in the months leading up to a constitutional referendum.
    • Seven people in the East African country of Tanzania were killed earlier this week following accusations of witchcraft.‘They were attacked and burnt to death by a mob of villagers who accused them of engaging in witchcraft,' said the police chief for the western Kigoma region, which borders Burundi.
    • Authorities in Burundi say two policemen have been stoned to death by a crowd who accused them of stealing
    • A 2009 revision of the Penal Code made homosexual relations punishable by three months to two years of imprisonment and/or by a fine of BIF50,000–100,000 (about US$33–$66). The Burundian Constitution prohibits same-sex marriage.
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by El Toro View Post
    Even if she did know beforehand, there may be many reasons to be careful about presenting yourself as "the other" in Burundi and many other places in the world.
    I was thinking more along the lines of letting the Governing Body know about her hormonal condition not anything related to her sexual preferences ect. From what I understand the IAAF knows about a lot more woman with the condition but refused to reveal it for liability issues. But their pushing this is what is causing to be publicized. Again, I'm not up to speed on all her details - for me this condition should be allowed.
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave View Post
    What does it matter if the athlete tried to hide it? It is still a serious competitive advantage.
    Why should the competitive advantage matter if it is natural? Is not that what they are worried about? Letting the IAAF know her condition would/could have settled their worries that she was doing something outside of the rules they set for competition. Again, I'm just speculating on her situation since I don't have all the facts surrounding her case.
    Last edited by proofs in the pudd'in; 04-18-2019 at 06:51 AM.
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    #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by proofs in the pudd'in View Post
    Why should the competitive advantage matter if it is natural? Is not that what they are worried about?
    Being 25 years old is natural. But at 25 you don't get to compete in under-20 or over-35 competitions.

    Many people weigh over 200 lbs naturally. But they don't get to wrestle or box in the featherweight division.

    Having two functioning legs is natural. But that means you don't get to compete in events for one-leg amputees.

    This isn't about whether athletes with hyperandrogenism should be allowed to compete; it's about whether they should be allowed to compete in women's events. If you have male-level testosterone coming from internal or external testicles, you should compete with the men. That may mean you won't be world class, but nobody has a right to be placed into a less-advantaged division than what fits their physiology so they can be world class.
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