Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    Indeed. Million, billion, trillion . . . it's just too big to wrap our teensy brains around.

    On the other hand, consider how infinitesimally small our entire universe is - less than 30 billion light-years across!
    That's just observable universe. There may be a helluva lot more space outside the observable radius.

    https://medium.com/starts-with-a-ban...e-73adef0fd480
    Observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Planck satellite are where we get the best data. They tell us that if the Universe does curve back in on itself and close, the part we can see is so indistinguishable from “uncurved” that it much be at least 250 times the radius of the observable part.

    This means the unobservable Universe, assuming there’s no topological weirdness, must be at least 23 trillion light years in diameter, and contain a volume of space that’s over 15 million times as large as the volume we can observe. If we’re willing to speculate, however, we can argue quite compellingly that the unobservable Universe should be significantly even bigger than that.
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    #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 18.99s View Post
    That's just observable universe. There may be a helluva lot more space outside the observable radius.
    I ain't no Stephen Hawking, but as he puts it, our universe is finite. Presuming the Big Bang was less than 15 billion years ago, and light-speed is the speed limit of the universe, and beyond the 'edge' of the universe there is NO space-time, there is no space beyond the radius of <15 billion light-years. There may be (probably are) other universes creating their own space-time, but we can't get there, cuz there's nothing to 'travel through' between them.
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    #23
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    So then we encounter the question of how to define the "no space" or "nothing" between universes. Seems to me that we know about as much about the limits of time, space, and reality as an ant equipped with a tiny telescope could know about what is going on around planet Earth.
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    #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jc203 View Post
    So then we encounter the question of how to define the "no space" or "nothing" between universes. Seems to me that we know about as much about the limits of time, space, and reality as an ant equipped with a tiny telescope could know about what is going on around planet Earth.
    That's not even remotely true....
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    #25
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    :-)
    OK, maybe what an ant colony with tiny telescopes in Central Park know about NYC. Trouble for ants and humans is not that we don't know a lot... it's that we are no where close to knowing how much more there is to know.
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    #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jc203 View Post
    :-)we are no where close to knowing how much more there is to know.
    Tru dat! We barely know what we do know, and that represents .000000000000etc1% of what there is to know!
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    #27
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    I think you guys are underestimating the amount of knowledge accumulated over the past 10-12,000 of years. Obviously, there is still a shitload of unknown.
    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
    by Thomas Henry Huxley
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    #28
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    I'm constantly amazed at how little we know about the most important thing in our lives, our brain and body. We have learned so much neuroscience / human biology in just the last 50 years and we still struggle so much with mental health and disease cures.
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    #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus
    we still struggle so much with mental health and disease cures.
    Once we unlock anatomy and physiology of memory, that would be a giant step in this direction.
    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
    by Thomas Henry Huxley
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    #30
    I agree that research on our minds and bodies is much more important than research on outer space. I wouldn't spend a dime looking for and photographing black holes.
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