Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #11
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    At 12 I attempted The Hobbit and failed. At 14 I did finish the Trilogy. I was not as enamored as most people who actually read it were, but when Peter Jackson's films came out, THEN I was in full appreciation of what JRRT had done.
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    #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    At 12 I attempted The Hobbit and failed. At 14 I did finish the Trilogy. I was not as enamored as most people who actually read it were, but when Peter Jackson's films came out, THEN I was in full appreciation of what JRRT had done.
    I read all four books when I was a sophomore in college back in the 70s'. I have seen all the Hobbit and LOTR movies. I must admit, I like the books much better.
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    #13
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    Meanwhile...

    The black hole is rather big.... about 6.5 billion solar masses.
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    #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conor Dary View Post
    Meanwhile...

    The black hole is rather big.... about 6.5 billion solar masses.
    It is beyond my comprehension.
    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
    by Thomas Henry Huxley
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    #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pego View Post
    It is beyond my comprehension.
    Indeed. Million, billion, trillion . . . it's just too big to wrap our teensy brains around.

    On the other hand, consider how infinitesimally small our entire universe is - less than 30 billion light-years across!
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    #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    Indeed. Million, billion, trillion . . . it's just too big to wrap our teensy brains around.

    On the other hand, consider how infinitesimally small our entire universe is - less than 30 billion light-years across!
    Well put, all one has to do is travel at the speed of light and you cross the entire universe in no time at all. .it is suffocatingly small!!
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    #17
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    How do we know it's not a fuzzy photo of a donut taken by a 400lb guy?
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    #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyp View Post
    How do we know it's not a fuzzy photo of a donut taken by a 400lb guy?
    LOL!!!!! You wrong for that jeremyp. LOL!!! LOL!!!
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    #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conor Dary View Post
    Meanwhile...

    The black hole is rather big.... about 6.5 billion solar masses.
    xkcd had a cartoon showing its relative size. https://xkcd.com/2135/
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    #20
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    It's pretty small in space....42 μas

    Or 42 microarcseconds....

    A microarcsecond is about the size of a period at the end of a sentence in the Apollo mission manuals left on the Moon as seen from Earth.
    Last edited by Conor Dary; 04-11-2019 at 06:42 PM.
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