Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #21
    I had thought that Lauren Wells was unbeaten by Australians in the W400H since Jana Pittman retired but I was wrong.

    She did lose to Pittman at the Perth Track Classic on 1 April 2011 55.75 to 55.97. She has been unbeaten until today, EXCEPT for one bad race, again at the Perth TC in 2014, when she came third in 59.09 behind Jess Gulli 57.39 and Lyndsay Pekin 57.80.

    I couldn't find out why she lost so badly to inferior competitors but it certainly wasn't there superior performance.

    So, today is her first "real" competitive loss since Pittman because nobody else has been within 2 seconds (!) of her PB since Wells first broke 56 in 2010, ending the year with a 55.25 PB.
    Last edited by El Toro; 01-28-2019 at 07:29 AM. Reason: fix incoherent writing
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    #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Toro View Post
    Edward Nketia (b. 8 May 2001) now apparently repping UnZud ran a PB 20.76 (-0.5), gaining on his recent best of 20.83 (+1.4) set just 2 weeks ago at the same venue.
    Quote Originally Posted by Vault-emort View Post
    Yeah that NZL thang is a bit of a shame since the family have been resident in Canberra for years now.

    He had the tightest lane in that 200 too so the big unit could have run faster in an outer lane and on a dry track (plus warmer weather and a tailwind).
    I guess he is the son of Gus Nketia, NZís 100m record holder (10.11).

    His times 10.30 and 20.76, break the NZ under 20 records of 10.35 and 20.94,respectively; the Bz under 19 records of 10.42 and 20.94; and presumably the under 18 records of 10.56 and 21.10.

    I do not know if young Nketia is an Australian citizen, good chance he isnít as NZers can live and work there without needing a residence visa. However, his decision to represent NZ is understandable - similar to Mondo.

    Much easier for him to get to the Olympic Games, WCs, CGs etc as a kiwi - given our crap sprinting.
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    #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Tuariki View Post
    Much easier for him to get to the Olympic Games, WCs, CGs etc as a kiwi - given our crap sprinting.
    You say that like Australia is living through a golden age of sprinting! And yes, he is Gus' son according to media reports but he turns 18 in May, so 2018 was his last year of U-18 eligibility.

    If we wait long enough in the reversing national representation game, he will represent Ghana in about 2026, or so.
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    #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Tuariki View Post
    I do not know if young Nketia is an Australian citizen, good chance he isnít as NZers can live and work there without needing a residence visa.
    I'm not sure about that or about the status of his younger brother, Gus jnr, who also sprints a bit.

    While what you say about work rights is true, we've been gradually trying to shut down all other entitlements over the last twenty years, you know, in remembrance of ANZAC history that somehow seems to have morphed into just AAC in this country. So I have to apologise about that.
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    #25
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    While you may consider Australian sprinting is in some sort of ice age at the moment, it is still light years in advance of NZ sprinting.
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    #26
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    At the end of the day, the best decision for the athlete is to make it to major champs and with those times, he's likely to at a junior level and if he progresses, through to seniors as well.

    I wondered when Wells might have lost last but it appeared close and might mean she's pushed more domestically, something she must have missed over recent years.

    If I am being greedy I wanted faster times but I guess with a long season ahead, people are building and if you're looking at Doha, you've got what must feel like a lifetime to wait.
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    #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tuariki View Post
    I guess he is the son of Gus Nketia, NZ’s 100m record holder (10.11).

    His times 10.30 and 20.76, break the NZ under 20 records of 10.35 and 20.94,respectively; the Bz under 19 records of 10.42 and 20.94; and presumably the under 18 records of 10.56 and 21.10.

    I do not know if young Nketia is an Australian citizen, good chance he isn’t as NZers can live and work there without needing a residence visa. However, his decision to represent NZ is understandable - similar to Mondo.

    Much easier for him to get to the Olympic Games, WCs, CGs etc as a kiwi - given our crap sprinting.
    That's why him being tagged with 'NZL' this week was a surprise. Was his 20.8 from the other week noticed as a NZL age record at all? There hasn't been any publicity here in his current hometown about NZL - before now - except references to Dad's still-standing kiwi record. Ed is still listed on the IAAF site (as with his younger brother) as AUS though I presume they have at least dual citizenship (if they have AUS citizenship).
    Last edited by Vault-emort; 01-28-2019 at 02:14 PM.
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    #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vault-emort View Post
    That's why him being tagged with 'NZL' this week was a surprise. Was his 20.8 from the other week noticed as a NZL age record at all? There hasn't been any publicity here in his current hometown about NZL - before now - except references to Dad's still-standing kiwi record. Ed is still listed on the IAAF site (as with his younger brother) as AUS though I presume they have at least dual citizenship (if they have AUS citizenship).
    Under NZ law it is not possible for a child under 18 to renounce their NZ citizenship
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    #29
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    Of course if young Nketia was of dubious character (e.g. gang related) or committed crimes in good old Oz the Aussies would have no hesitation in denying he was one of theirs and he'd be deported back across the ditch based on his being born in NZ. PS I did read that he was born in NZ
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    #30
    Quote Originally Posted by nztrackfan View Post
    Of course if young Nketia was of dubious character (e.g. gang related) or committed crimes in good old Oz the Aussies would have no hesitation in denying he was one of theirs and he'd be deported back across the ditch based on his being born in NZ. PS I did read that he was born in NZ
    Doesn't have to be gang related, just changing sporting affiliation is plenty... Of course, if NZ would just take advantge of our constitution, you wouldn't have to worry about this sort of thing.

    BTW, I'm assuming you are talking about Ed being born in NZ - what about Gus jnr?

    Also, while I recognise that he might have an easier path to major champs as a NZer, what about financial/medical support etc? Last time I knew anything about comparative support, Aus. was far superior on this front compared to the Far Eastern dominion.
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