Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #51
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    How to reduce number of athletes:

    OPTION 1: Cut both men and women 10000m track events.
    Make the XC race a mixed race with one man and one woman per qualified country. Medals would be awarded to top three in each race and one medal to best team (added time). 16-20 teams can qualify by scores from world XC championships.

    OPTION Better 2: Same as above but qualified teams who are eligible for the team title can have two males and two females athletes. Reduce teams to 10-12.

    Math: 10 teams x 4 = 40 PLUS 10 individual male runners and 10 female runners = Total of 60
    This is basically same numbers for 10000m races in Olympics. It could be implemented by 2024.

    OPTION Terrible 3: Limit number of athletes per country in T&F to two (no one on this list would like it).
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    #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by gm View Post
    YOU are not interested in those events. Many others are very interested.
    Oh please. There are numerous objective ways to measure how interesting an event is.

    1. How often is it discussed on message boards like this?
    2. How many hits does the race have on youtube?
    2b. How often is the athlete mentioned in social media or in the mainstream media
    3. How much airtime does the race get on NBC during the Olympics?
    4. How famous are the athletes in those events?

    If you look at these measures, I struggle to understand why someone would suggest removing the 10K and leaving some of the other events.

    With regard to #4, I would say Mo Farah is one of the most famous track athletes in the last decade. He generates interest because people are either rooting for him or rooting against him. Few are neutral. This is good for the sport.

    I am not saying nobody watches events like the discuss or the hammer or racewalking. I am simply saying I have never seen anyone excited about them. Most people only watch them if they have a specific rooting interest.
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    #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    and it has been shocking in recent years to see "distance oriented" Oregon crowds walk out en masse at Nationals when the 10s come around.
    The National 10,000 is hardly the the most exciting event these days...However, When they have distance night at Pre it's hugely popular...

    The hammer at the Trials was free and the only event and not many attended...they didn't even bother to open the East Grandstand.

    And most probably only attended from the novelty of having the hammer inside. That's the only reason I went.
    Last edited by Conor Dary; 09-20-2018 at 02:09 PM.
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    #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    and it has been shocking in recent years to see "distance oriented" Oregon crowds walk out en masse at Nationals when the 10s come around.
    In this era of smart-phones and social media people are consuming sports in different ways that did not exist say 15 years ago. For example, as recently as 2005, ESPN Sportcenter was one of the most popular shows on cable and it was repeated every hour. Nowadays hardly anyone watches it because everyone gets instant highlights.

    Nowadays most people have a short attention span. The 10K may not be stadium friendly because it takes half an hour. But a 10K race can have so much drama that the race can go viral on twitter and youtube which is today's equivalent of a water-cooler topic.

    The 10K race from the world championships of 1987 was one such drama filled event with all the confusion about which athletes had received the last lap bell and which ones did not. World class runners like Binns got confused and ran the 24th lap as if it was the last. He would have gone viral if twitter existed then.
    Last edited by mungo man; 09-20-2018 at 08:47 PM.
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    #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by mungo man View Post
    In this era of smart-phones and social media people are consuming sports in different ways that did not exist say 15 years ago. For example, as recently as 2005, ESPN Sportcenter was one of the most popular shows on cable and it was repeated every hour. Nowadays hardly anyone watches it because everyone gets instant highlights.

    Nowadays most people have a short attention span. The 10K may not be stadium friendly because it takes half an hour. But a 10K race can have so much drama that the race can go viral on twitter and youtube which is today's equivalent of a water-cooler topic.

    The 10K race from the world championships of 1987 was one such drama filled event with all the confusion about which athletes had received the last lap bell and which ones did not. World class runners like Binns got confused and ran the 24th lap as if it was the last. He would have gone viral if twitter existed then.
    The WCs in Rome..Italian shenanigans at their best....that was not even the worse of the fiasco in the 10k....the field showed up for what was suppose to be heats and the officials announce this was the final....so Panetta could have more days of rest for a double.
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