Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #11
    Just watching a replay, I noticed that I did hit the trifecta yesterday ... unfortunately, there was still about 30 seconds of running to go !
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    #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bambam1729 View Post
    Not only is it spectacular I think one of the most emotional moments in sports is when they sing My Ole' Kentucky Home, especially when they come to "Weep no more, my lady ... "
    somehow I doubt people of color share your emotion:

    1.
    The sun shines bright in the old Kentucky home,
    'Tis summer, the darkies are gay,
    The corn top's ripe and the meadows in the bloom,
    While the birds make music all the day.
    The young folks roll on the little cabin floor,
    All merry, all happy and bright:
    By'n by Hard Times comes a knocking at the door,
    Then my old Kentucky Home, good night!

    CHORUS
    Weep no more, my lady,
    Oh! weep no more to-day!
    We will sing one song for the old Kentucky Home,
    For the old Kentucky Home far away.

    2.
    They hunt no more for possum and the coon
    On the meadow, the hill, and the shore,
    They sing no more by the glimmer of the moon,
    On the bench by the old cabin door.
    The day goes by like a shadow o're the heart,
    With sorrow where all was delight:
    The time has come when the darkies have to part,
    Then my old Kentucky Home, good-night!

    (CHORUS)

    3.
    The head must bow and the back will have to bend,
    Wherever the darkey may go:
    A few more days, and the trouble all will end
    In the field where the sugar-canes grow.
    A few more days for to tote the weary load,
    No matter, 'twill never be light,
    A few more days till we totter on the road,
    Then my old Kentucky Home, good-night!

    (CHORUS)
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    #13
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    Any popular tune that dates from the Antebellum South is probably going to be weird.

    Sunset laws were still in force through the 1950s.
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    #14
    The words have long since been change to replace darkeys with people
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    #15
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    The song actually has abolitionist roots and undertones, and inspired/furthered abolitionist views and feeling in the mid-1800s:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Old_Kentucky_Home
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    #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrJay View Post
    The song actually has abolitionist roots and undertones, and inspired/furthered abolitionist views and feeling in the mid-1800s:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Old_Kentucky_Home
    Interesting indeed....
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    #17
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    I grew up in Louisville, and my parents still live there. When I hear "My Old Kentucky Home" sung during the post parade at the Kentucky Derby, I get sentimental, nostalgic, and yes, I tear up when they get to "Weep no more, my lady...". Just like I get nostalgic when I hear James Taylor's "Carolina in My Mind" (eight years in the Tar Heel state) especially at "And it seems like it goes on like this forever..." Maybe New Yorkers feel the same when they hear "New York, New York" and Chicagoans when they hear "My Kind of Town (Chicago Is)", but those are so jaunty, not as melancholy, that I'd venture they don't bring a tear to the eyes of natives of those places. Maybe hearing the late Jim Nabors sing "Back Home Again in Indiana" was as moving to a Hoosier.

    I don't think of slavery, I just think of Kentucky. The trees, the woods, open fields, farms, creeks, fishing holes, lightning bugs, cicadas, old stately homes, tradition. Things I miss about the state. Of course, there are fewer woods, fewer fields, fewer lightning bugs etc, courtesy of development, of progress. I think the feelings the song inspires are deeper and more strongly felt when one hears it while living 1000 miles away, and knows he won't live there again.
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    #18
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    In England cities don't have songs but football clubs do.....

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_...hip_Butty_Song
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    #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrJay View Post
    Maybe New Yorkers feel the same when they hear "New York, New York"
    Noooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!

    "Autumn in New York" and "NY State of Mind" for me. These will make me long to sit on a stoop in Brooklyn.
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    #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrJay View Post
    The song actually has abolitionist roots and undertones, and inspired/furthered abolitionist views and feeling in the mid-1800s:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Old_Kentucky_Home
    Chalk that up as my something-learned-for-the-day (which is an essential part of life).

    Will make me feel a little less guilty every time I get warm feelings for the Stephen Foster melodies I learned as a kid. (you want tear-jerking; doesn't get much better than Beautiful Dreamer)
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