Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #21
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    The song for Chicago is "Go, Cubs, Go!" by Steve Goodman who wrote "City of New Orleans"
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    #22
    My feel-good New York song is Give My Regards To Broadway.
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    #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    Chalk that up as my something-learned-for-the-day (which is an essential part of life).

    Will make me feel a little less guilty every time I get warm feelings for the Stephen Foster melodies I learned as a kid. (you want tear-jerking; doesn't get much better than Beautiful Dreamer)
    Truth be told, I just learned that on Saturday when I looked at the wiki page to learn a little more about the song. Back in grammar school, all we did was sing it. No dissertation about slavery, race relations, etc. Nor do I recall Bob Costas et al delving into that one.
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    #24
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    It was only in 1986 the lyrics were changed....

    Mostly likely, the song comes across as a nostalgic ode to a more genteel time in the life of the South. But that's not the song that Foster wrote in 1854. Inspired by the novel Uncle Tom's Cabin, he instead penned a lament by a slave in Kentucky who's been sold down the river to the Deep South by his master. The slave is both saying goodbye to his old Kentucky home and preparing to meet his imminent death from overwork and brutal mistreatment in the "land where the sugar canes grow."

    The problem is that Foster told the story by using words that are offensive to modern ears. In 1986, The Kentucky General Assembly passed a law that removed the words "darky" and "darkies" from the song and replaced them with "people." The same law requires that the new lyrics be sung at official state functions.

    Ken Emerson, author of a biography on Foster, describes the effect on the scene at Churchill Downs: "I find it very ironic that all these men and women in their lovely hats and fancy gowns are singing a song with adulterated lyrics and they think they are singing a song that is a celebration of the Antebellum South, with ladies in crinoline and dashing cavaliers."

    https://www.wnyc.org/story/hidden-me...kentucky-home/

    Who these days singing that song or watching the Derby would know that it is from the sad perspective of a slave. Knowing that, the line about being out of town by sunset takes on an entirely different meaning.
    Last edited by Conor Dary; 05-08-2018 at 08:50 PM.
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    #25
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    And finally...

    Foster began his career in the 1840s writing songs in the minstrel style. He had several big hits, including "Oh Susannah," "Camptown Races" and "The Old Folks at Home." It's a fact that, early in his career, he wrote a number of ugly songs. But his attitudes changed over time, and his musical portrayals of African Americans gained in dignity.

    He was a songwriter of undisputed brilliance who is often called the father of American music. But he died he broke and alone in New York City.
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    #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conor Dary View Post
    And finally...

    Foster ..... "The Old Folks at Home."
    Everyone knows Ed Norton wrote "Suwannee River"
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    #27
    Quote Originally Posted by NotDutra5 View Post
    Everyone knows Ed Norton wrote "Suwannee River"
    Knocccckkkk it off
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    #28
    The late, great Steve Goodman.
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    #29
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    Justify should have never been in the Derby field after failing test for the PED scopolamine at the Santa Anita Derby

    https://www.espn.com/horse-racing/st...t-triple-crown
    There are no strings on me
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    #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by guru View Post
    Justify should have never been in the Derby field after failing test for the PED scopolamine at the Santa Anita Derby

    https://www.espn.com/horse-racing/st...t-triple-crown
    This should be a big story but the main stream media seems to be ignoring it...for now.
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