Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by trackCanuck View Post
    Her coach knows. And Perec is about the last example I'd pick for relating speed to hurdling - to say she "dabbled" in the event might be an exaggeration.
    One should hope her coach knows!

    Improved speed invariably means a faster hurdles, absolutely, but it's not a like for like improvement.

    I wonder what her long term ambition is, heading towards Tokyo, and what event/s.
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    #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    Most of these athletes don't have problems early in the race when they're fresh, rather they have problems at the end of races when their legs are full of lactic acid.
    That's because they've gone out faster than they do in practice. All the more reason to anticipate/expect/practice stride problems.
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    #13
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    I guess it's a bit of horses for courses, but I do agree with Atticus here. Blasting off from the gun was so ingrained in an athlete like Ledovskaya, she was never going to change, but most athletes can learn to take a race out slower/faster as appropriate. That was one of Gunnell's strengths, starting the first half of the race with a more measured run, Hejnova does that, and Sprunger has learned to do that, hence her strong finish in London.
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    #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriella2 View Post
    I guess it's a bit of horses for courses, but I do agree with Atticus here. Blasting off from the gun was so ingrained in an athlete like Ledovskaya, she was never going to change, but most athletes can learn to take a race out slower/faster as appropriate. That was one of Gunnell's strengths, starting the first half of the race with a more measured run, Hejnova does that, and Sprunger has learned to do that, hence her strong finish in London.
    The 15-stride-pattern (men), all the way, can still be very effective, even though most (all?) world elites can hold 14 through the first 200 (some even 13!), for that very reason - you can finish very strongly.
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    stride patterns in the 400H
    #15
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    created so that McLaughlin's thread doesn't get hijacked too far off-topic
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    #16
    Some actual stride patterns mentioned here:

    http://hurdlesfirstbeta.com/free-art...tride-pattern/

    Dave Hemery's book discusses how hard he worked to learn to alternate lead legs. Except it didn't take and he ended up going back to 13 strides for the early hurdles and 15 strides for the later hurdles.
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    #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    And Georganne Moline.
    I'm not an aficionado of the event, but it has been my take that it's not any stride-pattern problem that has done her in in any of her multiple late-race heartbreaks; it's smashing into a hurdle she appeared to be in good position to clear.
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    #18
    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    I'm not an aficionado of the event, but it has been my take that it's not any stride-pattern problem that has done her in in any of her multiple late-race heartbreaks; it's smashing into a hurdle she appeared to be in good position to clear.
    If she had been in a good position to clear these hurdles, she wouldn't have crashed into them. What I've noticed on a couple of occasions is that she got too close to hurdle 7 or 8 when she went to 16 steps, which required her to switch from her right to her left leg.
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    #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    If she had been in a good position to clear these hurdles, she wouldn't have crashed into them.
    That's not always true. You can be in perfect position to clear the hurdle, but fatigue will deter your ability to raise the lead leg as you normally do. I have hit that last hurdle many times despite taking it perfectly in stride. It FEELS like you are raising it enough, but you strike it hard with the heel.
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