Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    they hate my favorite planes
    #1
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    first it was the demise of the 747, not it's the Airbus 380. Glad I bucket-listed that one already (but, sniff, missed out on the Concorde)


    https://apnews.com/03528316657247f78e8dd9a37a929779
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    #2
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    I have been in Concorde. However it was the prototype at a museum near Cambridge, England.

    In 2009 I stayed at a hotel by Heathrow airport. I arrived in the afternoon and my room was about 5 floors up directly opposite where taxiing planes turned onto the north runway for take-off. I occasionally looked out of the window to see what planes and airlines and after a short while I saw an Emirates A380 about 3rd in line dwarfing everything else and I realised that the cockpit was practically level with my window.

    On an aerospace theme that day was the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.
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    #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    first it was the demise of the 747, not it's the Airbus 380. Glad I bucket-listed that one already (but, sniff, missed out on the Concorde)


    https://apnews.com/03528316657247f78e8dd9a37a929779
    They will continue making them until 2021. And I'm sure the ones that are currently part of airlines' fleets will not be immediately scrapped. They will be around for many years.
    Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...
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    #4
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    I can remember the first time I got on an Airbus. I was about 23 and said to myself on boarding, well, lets see how many decades behind these European engineers are relative to American Engineers....

    As soon as I heard the lower freq. hum of the Airbus engines I knew that the Euros had struck pay dirt!.. Fantastic design, a real marvel !
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    #5
    While planning a Fall trip to Europe, I had first thought our leg across the Atlantic would be on a BA A380 from LAX to LHR. When I checked again, I found that the aircraft substituted was a 747.
    My understanding of airline economics is very thin,so I was surprised that they had replaced one plane with poor fuel economy with another known for poor fuel economy, rather than, for example, using a 787. I'm sure that BA has a fleet of bean counters calculating factors like expected passenger loads and revenues per gallon of jet fuel-- but I was disappointed that the A 380 was no longer being used!
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Django View Post
    While planning a Fall trip to Europe, I had first thought our leg across the Atlantic would be on a BA A380 from LAX to LHR. When I checked again, I found that the aircraft substituted was a 747.
    My understanding of airline economics is very thin,so I was surprised that they had replaced one plane with poor fuel economy with another known for poor fuel economy, rather than, for example, using a 787. I'm sure that BA has a fleet of bean counters calculating factors like expected passenger loads and revenues per gallon of jet fuel-- but I was disappointed that the A 380 was no longer being used!
    As far as I know (uncle used to be ground engineer for QANTAS) last minute swap for long haul is more likely to be due to technical problems, or unavailability due to delay of aircraft and/or flight crew hours limitations rather than for yield management.

    But yes, a lot of work is done modelling routes against aircraft characteristics in order to assign model types to particular routes. Old, but good discussion from people who know http://www.airliners.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=174075
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    #7
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    In 1978 when our group of Peace Corps Volunteers flew to Nepal we started in New York on a 747. We were on the plane continuously from Friday evening until Sunday morning....we had stops in London, Frankfurt and Tehran but they wouldn't let us off the plane until we got to Delhi...
    Last edited by Conor Dary; 02-18-2019 at 09:03 PM.
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    #8
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    What Killed the Biggest Passenger Plane Ever Flown?


    An A380 seats 484 passengers, as configured for the Australian airline, meaning it has a bit more than twice the capacity of a Qantas Boeing 787. And Joyce told BI that Qantas can operate two 787s for a bit less than the cost of running one A380, meaning the airline’s per-passenger cost is actually lower if it splits passengers up into the smaller planes. Given the obvious flexibility of using multiple planes instead of one — you can fly them at different times, or to different destinations — why would any airline want the giant plane?

    The theory behind the A380, as Airbus was conceiving it almost 20 years ago, was that airlines would continue to serve passengers through increasingly congested hub airports like London Heathrow and Los Angeles International, and that ever larger planes would be necessary to cope with the limited number of daily takeoffs and landings these airports could handle. Instead, air traffic grew more slowly than expected, and the rise of long point-to-point routes to secondary cities, increasingly operated by 787 or Airbus’s own A350, took pressure off the largest hubs.


    http://nymag.com/intelligencer/2019/...ver-flown.html
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    #9
    According to an article in today's Wall St Journal, BA inetends to phase out their fleet of 747s, and replace them with Boeing 777-9s between 2022 and 2025. The seating configuration will offer 325 seats.
    Meanwhile Airbus will be ending production of the A380 in 2021 because it never was profitable.
    Those wishing to fly on either the 747 or A380 had better hurry!
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