Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #21
    Quote Originally Posted by midwestfan View Post
    Philadelphia Inquirer . . . mention that the entire field (8 runners) all jumped together twice.
    First I've ever seen about a field of eight. Who were the two non-scorers?
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    #22
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    Sorry dj, made interpretation error reading article initially as the sportswriter seemed to imply there was six runners who false started twice and 2 runners false started three times and were eliminated.

    I replied earlier today to correct that and had about 4 paragraphs on quoting Art Morrow's comments I the Inquirer but somehow it did not get posted.

    There were only six finalists and all runners were Afro-American.

    After entire field was disqualified, AAU officials with Louis DeBendetto making decision to start over.

    Starter Lavelle brought the six to the starting line again and Barney Ewell false started again but was give another chance and the next start was clean and results are posted above.

    My question was if Charley Parker did not withdraw from the Sunday 100 would he have doubled as a high school runner winning 2 National AAU titles. He won the 100 on Saturday for the National Jr. Championships.
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    #23
    I doubt Parker would have won, In the junior 100, he beat Sr 5th placer Billy Mathis by one yard. In the senior 100, Young won and beat Conwell by at least one yard.

    Parker was better in the 200 than in 100, and with the oppressive heat Parker thought his chances were better in the 200 if he didn't have to run a heat and final of the 100 before the 200 final. In the Sr 200, he beat Conwell by inches. Parker was not a great starter, and Conwell led Parker by 2 yards at 100m.

    None of this makes Parker look like a potential winner of the Sr 100 in 1944 . . . unless he had avoided false starting twice!
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    #24
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    Charley Parker was 17 yrs old in the 1944 AAU Meet (2 weeks shy of 18th birthday). He ran three heats in the Junior 100 yds winning each heat with poor starts and a burst at end to catch the field. He ran 10.9, 11.2 and 11.1 in final. In final he was last out of blocks, last at 50 yard mark and 3rd at 85 yd mark before turning on his jets to catch Billy Mathis. His explanation was the weather, running 3 heats, and not getting to sleep until 2:30 am Saturday morning of meet. He had run a 10.3 race in San Antonio a few weeks before AAU meet.

    Rudolph Simms won the Jr AAU 1500 meter race in a very good time of 4:01.7 which would convert to about 4:18 mile.

    Footnote on Parker, He was a straight A student in high school, National Honor Society, President of Class. Went to UT in 1944 and into army in 1945 assigned to General McArthur's Hdq in Tokyo after war had ended. Returned to UT for 1947-1950 and then Law School. He died on April 25, 2010 at 83.

    My question still is how many "high school runners" have won a gold medal at an AAU Sr Championship Meet? I can think of three.
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    #25
    Quote Originally Posted by midwestfan View Post
    My question still is how many "high school runners" have won a gold medal at an AAU Sr Championship Meet? I can think of three.
    In the 100 alone I count three.

    1928, Frank Wykoff, Glendale (CA) HS '28
    1912-13, Howard Drew, Springfield (MA) HS '13
    1899, Arthur Duffey, Worcester (MA) Academy '99

    Interscholastic standards were different a century ago. There was a time when 21 year olds were allowed in interscholastic competition, which allowed for Drew to be eligible for the scholastic season of 1912, but not 1913 even though he was a high school senior.

    In the case of Drew in '12 and Duffey in '99, both AAU championships were contested after Sept. 1, which was the standard of the day.


    In the 200/220, I find three high schoolers.

    1944, Charley Parker, Thomas Jefferson (Dallas, TX) HS '44
    1913, Howard Drew, Springfield (MA) HS '13 (see 100 note about Drew)
    1904, William Hogenson, Lewis (Chicago, IL) Institute '04

    The 1904 AAU was contested in June. In September, he was the Olympic silver medalist in the 100, with both meets coming while he was 19 years old.
    Last edited by dj; 03-27-2018 at 02:25 PM.
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    #26
    Other AAU champions off the top of my head, and which I might well be able to add to later:
    880, Tom Campbell 1918
    Mile, Jim Ryun 1965
    HJ, Corny Johnson 1932-33
    LJ, Jesse Owens 1933
    JT, Zeke Bonura 1925
    Dec, Bob Mathias 1948-49
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    #27
    An add:
    110H, Joe Batiste 1939
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    #28
    Quote Originally Posted by dj View Post
    Other AAU champions off the top of my head, and which I might well be able to add to later:
    880, Tom Campbell 1918
    Mile, Jim Ryun 1965
    HJ, Corny Johnson 1932-33
    LJ, Jesse Owens 1933
    JT, Zeke Bonura 1925
    Dec, Bob Mathias 1948-49
    Zeke Bonura is an answer to a USA Olympic team trivia question. This is Jeopardy. Phrase your answer in the form of a question.
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    #29
    I remember the NCAA instituting the NFS rule for my senior year. The Penn Relays leadoff in the sprint medley was the 440 (yards) in those days, and I was picked to start it for Penn. I was pretty nervous when I realized that if I blew it, my three teammates would not get to run. But I had a legal start. My only false start ever was at an all-comers meet.
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    #30
    Quote Originally Posted by bambam1729 View Post
    Zeke Bonura is an answer to a USA Olympic team trivia question. This is Jeopardy. Phrase your answer in the form of a question.
    I've always thought of Bonura as a baseball player. No idea what the Olympic trivia might be.
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