Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleRBar View Post
    I know it's a decathlon 100, but it's still a 100 and as I recall, the 1988 Olympic (Seoul) decathlon 100 had several false starts. I don't remember the exact number.
    You're thinking Jurgen Hingsen, who was DQed after 3 false starts in the 100, which was what it took then to DQ a decathlete.

    And on that note, here is something Scott Davis and I came up with shortly after that Hingsen DQ in Seoul

    Jurgen In The Blocks

    It looked extremely rocky for the German deca fans;
    With Seoul but months away, injuries ruined all their plans;
    Guido was too old now, and Siegfried Wentz was badly hurt,
    All was left were memories of Willi, Hans and Kurt.

    And looking to the east, they eyed Christian and Torsten Voss,
    West German deca fans knew Seoul would be a total loss.
    And worst, Jürgen was a cripple – no chance, said the docs.
    But they'd bet even money now, with Jürgen in the blocks.

    But Hingsen had pulled his hamstring, and his knee joint was a mess
    And when he would recover, the orthopods could only guess;
    So Leichtathletik's faithful readers put away their timing clocks,
    For there seemed but little chance of Jürgen's getting to the blocks.

    But Hingsen started healing, to the wonderment of most,
    And Daley said he'd help him, though he looked like a ghost.
    So in a small Bavarian town, Daley helped Jürgen to run free,
    And when the 1500 was over, he'd qualified with 83.

    Shortly from thousands of German throats there rose a lusty yell,
    It rumbled in the DMZ; it rattled through the dell.
    It rocked Seoul's stadium, it mocked the German docs,
    For Jürgen, mighty Jürgen, was advancing to the blocks.

    There was ease in Jürgen's manner as he stretched his mighty bod,
    There was pride in Jürgen's muscles – like a Greek Olympic god.
    And when he settled on the starting line, he shook his golden locks,
    No German in the crowd could doubt 'twas Jürgen in the blocks.

    All eyes were upon him as the starter called them to the line,
    The Germans were ecstatic when he gave the thumbs-up sign.
    Then, when the starter bade the runners rise to start the race,
    Intensity gleamed in Jürgen's eye, then spread throughout his face.

    And then the starter's pistol sent a shock wave through the air,
    It fired not once, but twice – the start had not been fair.
    Jürgen jogged back to the line, his intensity now glowed red.
    "It wasn't me," said Jürgen. "It was you!," the starter said.

    From the stands, awash with Germans, went up a bellicose roar,
    Like the beating of the storm-waves on a stern and distant shore.
    "Kill him, kill the starter!" shouted someone from the stand; --
    And it's likely they'd have killed him had not Jürgen raised his hand.

    With a smile of Christian charity great Jürgen's visage shone;
    He stilled the rising tumult; he bade the race go on;
    He signaled to the starter, and once more the pistol blew;
    Jürgen was incredulous, but the starter said, "False start two."

    "Betrug," cried the maddened thousands, the German word for fraud,
    But a scornful look from Jürgen and the multitude was awed.
    They saw him stretch his hamstring; they saw his pectorals strain,
    And they knew that Jürgen would not jump the gun again.

    The smile was gone from Jürgen's face; it was contorted with desire;
    As he leaned against his starting blocks, he felt an inner fire.
    And then the hated starter pulled the pistol's trigger like a vice,
    And then the gun went off – again not once, but twice.

    Oh! somewhere in that favored land the sun is shining bright
    The band is playing somewhere, and somewhere hearts are light.
    Somewhere men are laughing, for all the clouds have parted,
    But there is no joy in Deutschland – Jürgen Hingsen has false started.
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    #12
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    Very good, bambam1729.
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    #13
    Quote Originally Posted by dj View Post
    1944 AAU 100m. I don't know how many recalls there were for the final, but each of the six runners was guilty of two false starts. After they'd all been disqualified, the referee decided to have the event contested as if nothing had happened.

    .
    Can't quite figure out why, after all 5 of his competitors had been dq, the last standing guy got that 2nd false start.
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    #14
    Whoops. Guess I should read thru the whole thread before responding.
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    #15
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    this clipping from the July 03, 1944, edition of TIME seems to indicate more than one false starter per call back, at least somewhere along the line.

    <<The Solons of the National Amateur Athletic Union solemnly decided last week that Claude ("Buddy") Young, famed University of llinois sprinter, could not call himself the 1944 A.A.U. 100-meter champion—even though he had won the race in a handy 10.5 seconds. Reason: Young and the five other Negroes in the 100-meter final were all disqualified for jumping the gun twice in the course of five false starts. The race was finally run as an exhibition just to please the crowd....>>
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    #16
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    Philadelphia Inquirer describes the 1944 AAU at Randall's Island as the 100 taking more than ten minutes to complete. Starter Jack Lavelle must have had to reload 3-4 times.
    They note six runners jumped 2 X, two runners jumped 3 x, and one jumped 4 x (I believe they were referencing Barney Ewell). They mention that the entire field (8 runners) all jumped together twice. The AAU officials had to rule on what to do and simply allowed the field to start one more time. I am editorializing now....probably the starter and starting line officials closed their eyes at the call "set" and opened them when they heard the gun shot sound.

    In article they also highlight a "high school" boy winning 220 yard final, Charley Parker from San Antonio, TX.

    How many "high school" runners have won a National AAU title besides Jim Ryun?
    Last edited by midwestfan; 03-24-2018 at 12:52 PM. Reason: spelling, grammar
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    #17
    Garry,

    My memory tells me the NCAA NFS rule discussed at Champaign in 1977 and implemented in 1978, not with the Provo meet in 1975.
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    #18
    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    this clipping from the July 03, 1944, edition of TIME seems to indicate more than one false starter per call back, at least somewhere along the line.

    <<The Solons of the National Amateur Athletic Union solemnly decided last week that Claude ("Buddy") Young, famed University of llinois sprinter, could not call himself the 1944 A.A.U. 100-meter champion—even though he had won the race in a handy 10.5 seconds. Reason: Young and the five other Negroes in the 100-meter final were all disqualified for jumping the gun twice in the course of five false starts. The race was finally run as an exhibition just to please the crowd....>>
    That may be, but either it was bad reporting or the AAU must have retracted that position. The 1945 AAU handbook shows Buddy Young as the winner, with all six finishers in the "final:" 2. Eddie Conwell; 3. Barney Ewell; 4 Herb Thompson; 5. Billy Mathis; 6. Herb Douglas.

    The team scores also reflect the 100 as having been counted as a championship.
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    #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by dj View Post
    That may be, but either it was bad reporting or the AAU must have retracted that position. The 1945 AAU handbook shows Buddy Young as the winner, with all six finishers in the "final:" 2. Eddie Conwell; 3. Barney Ewell; 4 Herb Thompson; 5. Billy Mathis; 6. Herb Douglas.

    The team scores also reflect the 100 as having been counted as a championship.
    Given the rigorous editing standards that TIME would have had in those days, I'm guessing that the "retracted position" is the more logical of the two options.
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    #20
    Garry,

    I don’t believe the NCAA adopted the NFS rule until 1978. I remember the discussion about implementation the following year at the 1977 meet in Champaign, IL.
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