Facts, Not Fiction

 
Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 41 to 44 of 44
  1. Collapse Details
     
    #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Powell View Post
    The 1900 Olympic track was 500 meters.
    Correct. And at the Olympics, it was 1/3rd mile in 1904 and 1908, in 1912 it was 383 metres, in 1920 it was 389.8 metres (I have no idea why), and in 1924 it was again 500 metres.
    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
     
    #42
    Quote Originally Posted by halharkness View Post
    I'll bite, what is that reason? I'm sure this is going to be good!
    Because running a 3:58 in the 1600 is meaningless to most of the general public but running 3:59.9 in the full mile has significant meaning. That is the reason why publicized attempts for elite high runners to break 4:00 are always for a full mile despite the high school rulebook.

    As for running a four exact laps - big deal. You simply put a line 9+ meters behind the finish line to start a full mile race. Non- high school tracks (and even some high school tracks) fo it already. It is not rocket science and you can still clerk the race from the same location.
    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
     
    #43
    Sorry, Halfmiler2, but you've used a term that makes me cringe every time I see it or hear it. I never refer to a "full mile". A mile is a mile. 1600m is something less. The word "mile" does not need an adjective to describe the distance. It's a mile. Period.
    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
     
    #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Halfmiler2 View Post
    Because running a 3:58 in the 1600 is meaningless to most of the general public but running 3:59.9 in the full mile has significant meaning. That is the reason why publicized attempts for elite high runners to break 4:00 are always for a full mile despite the high school rulebook.

    As for running a four exact laps - big deal. You simply put a line 9+ meters behind the finish line to start a full mile race. Non- high school tracks (and even some high school tracks) fo it already. It is not rocket science and you can still clerk the race from the same location.
    I'm not arguing that 1600 meters is superior to a mile. I am arguing that in an American track meet, it's superior to 1500 meters and thus the high school authorities correctly rejected the 1500 meters when they metricized. And the fact that it's four laps and approximates the mile, which was also four laps around 440 yard tracks (and is just over four laps around a 400 meter track) is part of the reason.
    Reply With Quote
     

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •