Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    Robert Harting and Gerd Kanter had their farewell competitions recently as well.
    Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt_London413 View Post
    It's rooted in basic neanderthal human thinking to round up or down.

    So that's why 30 is always a good place to retire. Why not 31 or 29?

    It's called laziness as well.

    What's so special about 30 other than being a nice round number?

    Why allow a stupid round number to determine whether you're going to retire or not?
    Is there any evidence that athletes retire at 30 more than at any other age?
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    I believe most top-class athletes nowadays go on longer than that.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt_London413 View Post
    It's rooted in basic neanderthal human thinking to round up or down.

    So that's why 30 is always a good place to retire. Why not 31 or 29?

    It's called laziness as well.

    What's so special about 30 other than being a nice round number?

    Why allow a stupid round number to determine whether you're going to retire or not?

    Get my point here?

    And going back to what I said earlier. The human body hits its peak in upper 30s to low 40s for power and speed.

    No reason to retire so early at 30.


    When someone asks you what time it is. You say 721. You don't say 720.

    I'm going to train you all to think in odd numbers.

    Never say 100 dollars. Say 101 dollars.

    Never say 20 dollars. Say 21 dollars.

    Never say you run the 100 in 10.5.

    Give the exact time. Say 10.51.

    The more you all stop thinking in basic neanderthal thought patterns the less athletes will retire at 30.
    Which explains why Kim Collins, who probably knew he'd never run 9.7x and probably wouldn't get an Olympic medal, in his mid-to-late-30s (4 Olympics had passed since his 2003 World Champs win), stayed on the track long enough to run 9.93 at 40 because he knew he was still capable of running 9.9x.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 18.99s View Post
    Is there any evidence that athletes retire at 30 more than at any other age?
    it wouldn't surprise me to find out that there's a bump in the number of retirements at that age just because people are generally so well-attuned to "milestone" numbers and would feel a lot older as a 30-something.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gh View Post
    it wouldn't surprise me to find out that there's a bump in the number of retirements at that age just because people are generally so well-attuned to "milestone" numbers and would feel a lot older as a 30-something.
    And that milestone is also a full Olympiad past the peak years (24-26) for most athletes.

    By that age you finally realise that you've given your best, you're not likely to get that one last, great performance and you're body no longer recovers like it used to.

    Sure, you might be able to last a few more years but you've also been doing intensive training and competition for half your life, so mentally, you might be ready to try something new.

    From an employer's point of view, a 30 year old starting a second career directly from the top of their first career is much more attractive than a 40 year old track bum whose first career abandoned him/her because he/she didn't have the judgement to call time much earlier.
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    I've tracked U.S. retirements for about the last 15 years.

    As far as I can tell, retirement in t&f has little to do with a specific age but is entirely interwoven into the four-year track cycle. The year showing the most retirements is the year following an Olympics, the second most retirements--and it's close to being #1--is following the post-Olympics World Champs year. The third most retirements come after the fallow year with no U.S. global champs. Almost no one retires in the year of an Olympic Games unless it's for injury.

    My tracking is based on the last year before "retirement" as the last year an athlete appeared in the U.S. top-50 of any global championship event or competed in the national championships (other than marathon, cross country, and walks).
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    Silke Spiegelburg, german pole vaulter, announced her retirement. She has been plagued by injuries in recent years so decided to call it a career.
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    Ex-Michigan All-American Nicole Sifuentes has announced her retirement.

    http://blog.saucony.com/an-unforgettable-ride/
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    Quote Originally Posted by tandfman View Post
    Ex-Michigan All-American Nicole Sifuentes has announced her retirement.

    http://blog.saucony.com/an-unforgettable-ride/
    I wonder if the ridiculousness of the Canadian CG standards being stricter than those for the OG (!) was part of the reason.

    I didn't know Justin Bieber was head of the Canadian selection committee...
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