Facts, Not Fiction

 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 47

Hybrid View

  1. Collapse Details
    should your kid have a cell phone?
    #1
    Quote Originally Posted by polevaultpower View Post
    But in those days, what access was there to the sport? I'm sure it was on TV and in the papers, maybe the fans like you subscribed to T&F News...

    Nowadays the potential to reach these kids is phenomenal. What are kids, like 17 and under using these days? My understanding is they are mostly over Facebook and Twitter, it's more Snapchat and Instagram? Probably other apps I don't even know about. Periscope?

    Track and Twitter work well together. Track and Periscope work well together, but not when the meet is televised.

    How do you package the information for Instagram and Snapchat? What information do you want to convey? Are you trying to get them to tune in on TV? A webcast? What if their parents aren't willing or able (like if they aren't home) give them the cable/satellite log in to access the NBC webcast? Just because someone theoretically has access to the NBC Webcast doesn't mean they can actually log in.

    How many high school kids watch live TV on any kind of regular basis? Is trying to get them to tune into live TV a good goal? If we want them to tune into a web cast, it needs to be easily accessible, and something that requires your PARENTS to log in, is not easily accessible.

    I don't have the answers, but I feel like most people are not even asking the right questions...
    I have three kids in that age group (12-15) so I will add my perspective. This generation of teens doesn't watch a lot of tv, but sure as heck they deplete every iPhone, iPad and computer of every ounce of power left in them. My kids and their peers are on Instagram and snap chat a lot, they don't use Facebook or Twitter that much. The powers to be need to market more online material and iPhone apps. sitting down and watching the Olympics on tv is something my generation of middle age men would do !
    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
     
    #2
    Many people don't know that any cellphone* without an account can still call 911 in the US. These days almost everybody over 25 has an old unused phone (or several) sitting in a drawer or box somewhere, or can purchase a flip phone for under $30, so I don't see a reason NOT to give children a basic cellphone at least for 911 purposes (once they're old enough that they won't dial 911 randomly or for fun).


    *unless it's too foreign or too old to connect to today's cellular networks in the US
    Last edited by 18.99s; 03-25-2016 at 12:13 PM.
    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
     
    #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Woodland Park, CO
    Posts
    7,654
    My 16 yo son and 14 yo daughter have had cell phones for several years, started with flip phones, I think, but now smart phones. Having them makes logistics easier, especially with busy schedules, after school activities, etc. So far neither has been caught up in a sexting scandal like happened in Canon City, CO. They're making A's in school, running track, singing in the school choir (son), playing flute and piano (daughter), and doing well socially. They use the phone to google things (like how did Trayvon Bromell do in his latest meet?....my son's current sprint hero.) The downsides? They read less than I would like, and they are distracted by them while studying. Could solve both by having some specific rules, but hard for me to do that when things are good. If their GPA was 2.8, then it'd be a different story. They are not as addicted as many of their friends.
    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
     
    #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Right next to a Gator filled pond
    Posts
    4,820
    Quote Originally Posted by DrJay View Post
    My 16 yo son and 14 yo daughter have had cell phones for several years, started with flip phones, I think, but now smart phones. Having them makes logistics easier, especially with busy schedules, after school activities, etc. So far neither has been caught up in a sexting scandal like happened in Canon City, CO. They're making A's in school, running track, singing in the school choir (son), playing flute and piano (daughter), and doing well socially. They use the phone to google things (like how did Trayvon Bromell do in his latest meet?....my son's current sprint hero.) The downsides? They read less than I would like, and they are distracted by them while studying. Could solve both by having some specific rules, but hard for me to do that when things are good. If their GPA was 2.8, then it'd be a different story. They are not as addicted as many of their friends.
    My kids are a bit older but I've had pretty much the same experience as you did.
    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
     
    #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Chattanooga
    Posts
    4,740
    Haven't read the whole thread, but it's unbelievable that many schools allow them in the classrooms.
    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
     
    #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Right next to a Gator filled pond
    Posts
    4,820
    Quote Originally Posted by BillVol View Post
    Haven't read the whole thread, but it's unbelievable that many schools allow them in the classrooms.
    My kids school integrated them into the classroom at least 5 years ago.
    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
     
    #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Chattanooga
    Posts
    4,740
    Quote Originally Posted by NotDutra5 View Post
    My kids school integrated them into the classroom at least 5 years ago.
    For what reason?
    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
     
    #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Right next to a Gator filled pond
    Posts
    4,820
    Quote Originally Posted by BillVol View Post
    For what reason?
    Communication, research, and basically anything else you can use a computer for. They found it better than fighting the future.

    The covered wagon era ended a long time ago.
    Last edited by NotDutra5; 03-26-2016 at 02:13 PM.
    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
     
    #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Santa Barbara
    Posts
    954
    Smart phones are mini-computers more powerful than the 1st generation desktops that were introduced into classrooms 20-plus years ago. They have all kinds of legit, powerful educational utilities in just about every field of study.

    But, as with any digital device, given the opportunity kids and adults tend to spend a lot of time socializing or googling random stuff. Tough (i.e., impossible) for instructors to supervise effectively.

    As for the larger discussion of whether kids should have smartphones, for most middle/upper economic level families it seems like a done deal already, a moot question.

    Literally millions of American toddlers have already learned to manipulate phone screens by age 3 or 4. Those kids have, or will soon have, smartphones and they will use them as primary modes of communication and information gathering whether we old codgers like it or not.
    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
     
    #10
    Heck, why not. Half the kids are drugged to the gills anyway.
    Reply With Quote
     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •