Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by cladthin View Post
    It's Mar-tee-nez.

    I don't quite how to use a typical keyboard to give it a real phonetic spelling.
    you needn't worry about those funky "real" characters that nobody but a trained linguist knows; there are all kinds of acceptable ways to get your point across. And accepted convention is to use capital letters for stress, as in: mar-TEE-nez.

    The problem with the Brits (to generalize, having worked with many in my announcing career) is that they see the "english" word Martin at the front, use that and continue from there. QED: MAR-tin-ez
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    #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by cladthin View Post
    It's Mar-tee-nez.

    I don't quite how to use a typical keyboard to give it a real phonetic spelling.
    You didn't indicate the accent at all. It's mar-TEE-nez. Family names like Martinez, Gonzalez, Hernandez stress the penultimate syllable.

    I have to say that Storey is really getting on my nerves. He needs to be given a small collection of "superb's", "it really is's", "class act's" for each telecast, and when they're gone, he has to think of other words to say. "It really is" was Carol Lewis' favorite crutch, if you recall.
    Cheers,
    Alan Shank
    Woodland, CA
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    #33
    Quote Originally Posted by tamabi View Post
    That's how I would pronounce it indeed, but then I come from a country with a latin-based language. You wouldn't believe how many French names are being butchered by English-speaking (or non-French speaking in general) commentators...
    Not only French. Geman, Nordic, whatever. Lars Riedel anyone? Rydell, Reedell. Not close. It's REEdl. Some music commentators can't even say Haydn correctly.
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    #34
    Well, of course, there isn't a universal correct way to pronounce any name!
    Take Birmingham in England. Now, it could be argued that the locals must be pronouncing the name correctly, but, that correctly is very different than the local pronuciation in Birmingham Alabama.
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    #35
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    Stuart Storey has the most appalling set of clichés in present day commentating. Why the .... the Beeb don't replace, lord knows.
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    #36
    To be fair to commentators a typical DL meet has 7 DL events plus the extras. Most have at least 8 competitors, some 12 and the countries with their own unique language or pronunciation will include England, Scotland, Ireland, the USA, Canada, France, Spain, Germany, Poland, Russia, Kenya, Ethiopia, Uganda, South Africa, Nigeria, Brazil, Columbia, Portugal, Italy, Belgium, Serbia, Croatia, Morocco, Egypt, Norway, Sweden, Finland, China, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, Botswana, the Baltic states, Ukraine and many more.

    Basically a typical meet will have 100, athletes from over 40 countries and almost all of them speak with a different language and/or accent. Heck in most countries the accents have multiple variants of accent and pronunciation and even spelling e.g. Lynsey/Lindsey,/Lyndsey, Amy/Aimee and some don't have a consistent translation e.g. Hannah/Ganna/Hanna from Russian/Ukrainian. The commentators will name most of them in under 2 hours, often in rapid succession and calling action. I think they deserve a break for not always being able to get it 100% right on the spot or not always knowing the correct way to say it or even forgetting.
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    #37
    Where's an ironic emoticon when you need one? North Americans calling out Brits on poor pronounciation. That would be a double emoticon for gh, who gave the London 2012 crowd hours of amusement with his idiosyncratic pronounciation.
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    #38
    I've just realised that the title of this thread can be drawn into the pronunciation debate!
    The title could read " Ain't no ham in Birmingham!"
    Why?
    Because, in the local working-class pronunciation, the "ham" is pronounced more like "gum".
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    #39
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    The Oscar for sh.t pronunciation must be awarded to the guy who co- commentated on the Euros for the EAA website in the company of Peter Matthews. Do not know his name but his mispronunciation of 90 % of the athletes names was epic.!!!
    Was it the same guy as the one caused near hysteria on our AW site a couple of years ago with dyslexia of name pronunciation?
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    #40
    Quote Originally Posted by FrankS View Post
    Well, of course, there isn't a universal correct way to pronounce any name!
    Of course there is. The correct way to pronounce any name is the way the individual whose name it is pronounces it. A good announcer will aim to do that every time, no matter what the athlete's nationality may be.
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