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    Re: Jackie Robinson and the long jump
    #11
    DJ and I have also worked on what we think would have happened if there had been an OT preceding an OG in 1940. Below is the fictitious account of what would have happened -


    The leading contenders in the Long Jump were Mack Robinson’s younger brother Jackie, the NCAA champion, Billy Brown the winner of the AAU, UCLA teammates Pat Turner and Bill Lacefield, Trials decathlon winner Bill Watson, and Frank Freeman. One man not competing was Barney Ewell, who had jumped 25’2 ½” indoors, but was concentrating on the sprints at the Trials. At the end of round 1, Brown led with 24’11”, from Watson’s 24’9 ¼” and ’32 champion Ed Gordon’s 24’6 ½”. Robinson then flew out to a PR 25’10 in round 2. By the end of the third round the order was Robinson, Brown, Watson, Turner [24’8 ½”], Lacefield [24’8”], Gordon and Freeman, whose 24’5” wasn’t good enough to carry forward to the second half of the competition. Lacefield moved into second in round 5 with 25’4 ½”, only to be overtaken by Watson, with a PR 25’7” with his last jump. Brown responded well with a final jump of 25’2”, but the best was saved to last as Robinson improved yet again, this time to 26’4, to become #2 all-time.

    BJ, Jackie Robinson (UCLA/SCAA) 26-4 (2, _ W, A) (<24-6 ½, 25-10 PR, 24-9, x, 25-3 ½ , 26-4); 2. Bill Watson 25-7 PR (24-9 ¼, x, 24-6 ½ , 23-8 3/4, x, 25-7); 3. Bill Lacefield (UCLA/SCAA) 25-4 ½ (<24-6 ½, 24-3, 24-8, 24-7, 25-4 ½,x); 4. Billy Brown 25-2 (24-11, 24-5 ½ , 23-10 ¼ , 24-7, x, 25-2); 5. Pat Turner (UCLA/SFOC) (<24-6 ½, 24-1, 24-8 ½, x, x, 24-5); 6. Ed Gordon (GSB) (24-6 ½, 24-1, 23-9, 24-4 ¾ , 24-2 ¾ , 24-0); 7. Frank Feeman (SFOC) (23-11 ½ ,x, 24-5); . . . dnc: Ewell. ALSO: Ray Atzet (SCAA), Ed Vasconcellos (SJSt), Welles Hodgson (Minn), Walter Arrington (MiSt)
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    Re: Jackie Robinson and the long jump
    #12
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    I've always thought that Jackie had the ability to jump way past 26'. He just never really concentrated on the long jump (broad jump). The 1940 Olympic Games would have been very interesting. Thanks rhymans and dj.
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    Re: Jackie Robinson and the long jump
    #13
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    Through 1940 how many men had jumped over 26 ft? The three I found:

    Sylvio Cator, 26'0", 1928
    Chuhei Nambu, 26'2", 1931
    Jesse Owens, 26'8.25" 1935
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    Re: Jackie Robinson and the long jump
    #14
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    Eulace Peacock jumped 26'3" at the 1935 AAU champs. DeHart Hubbard jumped 26'2 1/4" in 1927, but it was disallowed.
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    Re: Jackie Robinson and the long jump
    #15
    Re: Hubbard...his WR was not approved because the takeoff board was 1 inch higher than the pit, which does made a difference. Assuming a takeoff angle of around 20 degrees, rough calculations indicate it gave him about 3 inches of distance or slightly more. Even factoring that out, it was still his career best jump.
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    Re: Jackie Robinson and the long jump
    #16
    Quote Originally Posted by 4:24-miler
    Through 1940 how many men had jumped over 26 ft? The three I found:

    Sylvio Cator, 26'0", 1928
    Chuhei Nambu, 26'2", 1931
    Jesse Owens, 26'8.25" 1935
    Luz Long, world leader in 1937 with 7.90, less than an inch from 26ft, could have been a serious threat to Robinson and the Americans in 1940.
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    Re: Jackie Robinson and the long jump
    #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4:24-miler
    Through 1940 how many men had jumped over 26 ft? The three I found:

    Sylvio Cator, 26'0", 1928
    Chuhei Nambu, 26'2", 1931
    Jesse Owens, 26'8.25" 1935
    Cator and Nambu were great to be sure, but something causes me to doubt the wisdom of raising either of them over their peer Ed Hamm.
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    Re: Jackie Robinson and the long jump
    #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mighty Favog
    Re: Hubbard...his WR was not approved because the takeoff board was 1 inch higher than the pit, which does made a difference. Assuming a takeoff angle of around 20 degrees, rough calculations indicate it gave him about 3 inches of distance or slightly more. Even factoring that out, it was still his career best jump.
    This gets a little iffy when you apply mathematics/geometry to actual circumstances.
    How was that 1" depression determined?
    Was the board one inch higher than the pit or was the sand level one inch below top edge of pit? It makes a difference.
    Was the measurement by tape held horizontally or laid flat on ground/sand?
    How far was takeoff board from pit?
    Was his first mark in sand made by foot, hand, butt or back?

    For a 1" high triangle, a measured hypotenuse of 26' 2.25" would be 26' 1.96" horizontally.
    If measured from a board 10' from the pit, with sand one inch below board/pit top edge level, the horizontal distance would be 26' 2.09"

    Assuming a perfect parabola with a takeoff/landing angle of 20%, a 1" elevation has a tangent of 2.59 inches which would reduce the horizontal distance covered to 25' 11.96", assuming the feet touched the sand one inch higher.

    In real life, observing thousands of jumps over 40 years, I have seen very few perfectly level pits. Unless pits are screeded after every jump, a 1" depression in a smoothly broomed or raked pit is hard to detect, even by an experienced pit judge/crew.
    Also, jumps are not geometrically perfect. Extend too far, fall back, lose distance. Drop feet of stand up, lose distance.
    I don't know that I have ever seen a picture perfect jump. . with the possible exception of Shelia Hudson.
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    Re: Jackie Robinson and the long jump
    #19
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    And in the eventuality that the Hubbard board was an inch high because the board was sticking up out of the runway that much, then there's another multiplier that comes into play, because you change the leverage of the jump.

    (for the simplest way to see this in action, try high jumping off a box in front of the pit; you go higher than the simple extra height of the box) (on second thought; I guess that used to work in the old straddle days: don't think I'd recommend it to a flopper!)
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    Re: Jackie Robinson and the long jump
    #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by gh
    And in the eventuality that the Hubbard board was an inch high because the board was sticking up out of the runway that much, then there's another multiplier that comes into play, because you change the leverage of the jump. )
    That was what I meant in asking if the board was higher than the pit. Should have specified runway. .. I don't know how to calculate that advantage..
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